Follow the latest on RallyPoint. Get insights from the top online professional network for service members and veterans.

Most Recent Discussions

3
3
0
B046c57a
A little food for thought last night, but did you see something to sway you either way...?
10 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
4
4
0
So I am planning on a trip to Texas from North Dakota in the near future. I have been told I might be able to bring my cat with me. How do you go about purchasing a ticket and letting them know you are bringing your cat as a carry-on? Looking for all helpful advice/tips anything.
Posted in these groups: Freeby_travel_1p3770 TravelAnimals_logo AnimalsCats_logo CatsFlying_logo Flying
6 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
4
4
0
So under AR 165-1 anything discussed with a Chaplain is considered confidential. I was curious, when dealing with pax and others that disclose situations that involve TS info, is it legally allowed for Chaplains to listen/receive info involving TS contexts (without a TS clearance)? This is under the pretense of AR 165-1 and its definition of confidentiality, and sacramental vows of confession (if applicable), and just being a good Chaplain.

Chaplains are required to have a secret clearance, btw (if you're not tracking).
11 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
17
17
0
I know I'm probably playing with fire and causing people to be uncomfortable, but I can honestly sit and have this conversation with anyone and not get upset. I just want to know peoples views who served and who is currently serving now. If you don't think any of it exist please explain why. Thanks
105 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
54
54
0
95736874
Great POTUS . . . highly motivational speech . . . I wish we had this kind of leadership today . . .

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=00F9OgOxMa4
Posted in these groups: Imgres President (POTUS)
161 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
6
6
0
Posted in these groups: Leadership-abstract-007 LeadershipAmerican-flag-soldiers Soldiers
10 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
7
7
0
41 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
12
12
0
04efa43f
I'm a DS and I see the hunger in a Soldiers eyes to be like his DS. What made your Drill Sergeant separate himself from the others?
44 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
0
0
0
D362a8bd
My recent PCS is costing me thousands out of pocket because of a broken travel system. Any other horror stories out there?

I am currently in Atlanta sleeping on the floor outside the closed USO. My wife had the same experience last week and we've had little to absolutely no support from my losing or gaining station. There are many "Murphys Laws" experiences that have occurred on my trip but I'd like to hear yours.

I plan on addressing this issue at an instillation level if I get enough feedback. Have any of you and/or your families been left to fend for themselves during a PCS move? I need your feedback in order to fix a broken system.

We deserve better and our families deserve better.
2 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
6
6
0
F4af669
Our American political scene has always been full of "selfish ignorance" for their point of view without considering the "big picture" on our society as a whole. As the "Me /Now" society grows, the "enthusiasm of ignorance" has grown within the extreme elements of each political party who's negative intention is only to "manipulate" rather than communicate.
In 2003, General Mattis's formed a countermeasure for this type of behavior to best prepare individuals in a combat zone mission in Iraq (5-3-5 Tenets). We carried Tenets as pockets cards and used to as a guide us on a daily basis. How can we shape/re-word his principals to best prepare the "non-extremist" individuals of both parties to stand against our greatest intangible enemy on the Homefront, the "enthusiastic ignorance" of fellow Americans within our own individual circle of influence?
Posted in these groups: 6262122778_997339a086_z PoliticsBigstock-motivational-concept-got-mot-30228101 MotivationD11e08ce Courage
4 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
7
7
0
0028aaf3
One of the school clubs my daughter is in will be putting together and sending out care packages. For those that are or have deployed what small things would have made or would make your life a little bit more enjoyable.
Posted in these groups: Imgres Deployment720cd677 Package Delivery
13 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
126
126
0
986072de
I bring up this question because my wife was treated very pourly by another spouse because of my rank! Here husband is a Major in the Marines and she has told others that is the reason she doesn't like my wife.

Why play the "Rank Card?" RP Members your thoughts?

Why is this still happening in our veteran and retirement community? I've always addressed service members here on RP by their rank initially out of respect for what they have accomplished and then I drop it and start addressing them by their first name as much as possible. Accordingly, RP allows you to highlight the name of another member, so your RP Connections will receive an email and the rank is required - got it!

I think once we leave the service there shouldn't be a stereotyping of rank or service - we should get along and respect each other as veterans and retirees that served a "common purpose!" Again, this just my opinion!

By thw way my wife has never played the "rank card" and never will!
372 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
129
129
0
We hear about how all these Vets are triple dipping, but I don't think people are educated on how hard it actually is to do this, and how very small of a percentage of people can qualify to do this.

You have to meet all of these requirements: Serve over 20 years, receive a 50% or more VA Rating, be deemed unemployable or 100% disabled by the VA, AND qualify for SSI benefits.
Posted in these groups: Retirement_logo Retirement
496 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
3
3
0
I belong to several groups that wear military uniforms with modified insignia: Naval Sea Cadets (adult leader), Coast Guard Auxiliary, Civil Air Patrol and formerly California State Military Reserve. They all have their own ribbon awards as well. They are authorized by their respective services to wear them and I am proud to wear those uniforms and representing myself a a member of these respective groups; however, I still sometimes wonder if it goes too far since the public usually thinks they are actual military members. However, where I really think is really crosses the line are a couple of organizations that are formed to provide military honors to deceased veterans that wear modified Army uniforms and make themselves "generals" and "colonels" Yes they provide a valuable service and I know a few people in them. However, unlike the formerly mentioned groups I don't believe they ever had official permission to wear them by they Army and there is very little vetting/screening to people who join them. Prior military service is not required Many who join those groups seem to be "wannabes" either never been in the service or was in at much lower rank than what they are offered. I know its nice to have people in military-style uniform provide funeral honors, however if a military active or reserve group cant be found, American Legion and VFW have honor guard uniforms that they wear for them. What your thoughts about the wear of such uniforms particularly of the latter mentioned groups.
Posted in these groups: Clothing2 Uniforms524395_331088503647420_191451722_n Stolen Valor
5 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
4
4
0
My 16 year old brother attends a military school in PA. I recently learned from my parents that the civilian faculty wear ACUs daily and sport "honorary" rank. His English teacher, for example, is LT So and So. After looking over the school's website, I found that the president himself is retired from British Army, but wears ACUs with the British flag on his shoulder and a British beret. I understand that this is all meant to add to the military structure and environment, however, I feel that these titles have not been earned, and the uniform that so many have died in should not be worn so nonchalantly. Moreover, I don't understand why the president is permitted to mix and match uniforms as opposed to just wearing his country's full uniform.
Posted in these groups: Clothing2 UniformsBooks Schools
12 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
37
36
1
Tumblr_mg10mifgok1rnru74o1_1280-1024x576
http://www.wearethemighty.com/marine-corps-myths-2015-04
U.S. Marines love to talk about their history — from battles won to the heritage of uniform items — but sometimes, that history gets a little muddled.

There are some things in Marine lore that are passed on as tradition or legend that have no basis in fact. The truth hurts, Marines, but it’s more important to get our history right.

Here are the four biggest fictions that Marines have kept alive over the years:
1. The “blood stripe” on the NCO and officer dress blue uniform pants commemorates the 1847 Battle of Chapultapec.

According to Marine legend, a large number of Marine officers and non-commissioned officers perished while assaulting the castle at Chapultapec, Mexico in 1847. To signify their bravery, the Corps later authorized a red “blood stripe” for NCOs and officers to remember and honor their sacrifice.

It sounds legit, but it’s completely made up. Following an Army uniform practice about ten years before this battle, the Corps began putting stripes on its trousers. The color choice of the stripes changed over those years until solid red was adopted in 1849, according to the Marine Corps Museum. The Corps chose red at the time not to commemorate Chapultapec, but to match the red accents of the blues jacket.

As Jeff Schogol wrote at Stars & Stripes:

“While a wonderful story, and one that is taught to incoming recruits, it is only a story,” Beth L. Crumley, of the Marine History Division, said in an e-mail.

The Marines first started wearing the scarlet stripe on blue pants in 1840, borrowing the tradition from the Army. Moreover, seven Marines were killed at Chapultepec out of a force of between 400 and 450 Marines.

2. Marines have never surrendered.

U.S. Marines are (and should be) proud of their battlefield heroics, from battling Barbary pirates to fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. But with that long battle history comes the claim that Marines have never surrendered. While this claim serves to motivate Marines to always fight just as hard as those who came before, it is not really true.

Just one day after the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Marines — under the command of Maj. James Devereux — were under siege on a tiny Pacific atoll called Wake Island. The Marines of the 1st Defense Battalion put up an incredible 15-day fight, sinking ships, damaging or destroying more than 70 aircraft, and holding off the Japanese despite overwhelming odds.

But the Marines were ultimately unable to hold off the enemy. Though their fight serves as an amazing tale of Marine bravery in the opening days of America’s involvement in World War II, they finally surrendered to the Japanese on Dec. 23, 1941.

USNI’s Robert J. Cressman wrote a fantastic article explaining how the decision was made (emphasis added):

About an hour after daylight (0630), Commander Keene picked up the telephone in the contractors’ headquarters and found Commander Cunningham and Major Devereux engaged in conversation on the line. The latter reported being hard-pressed at his command post. He did not believe, he said, that the battalion could hold out much longer. Cunningham told Devereux that if he did not feel he was able to continue fighting, he should surrender. A discussion between the two men then ensued. “You know, Wilkes has fallen,” Devereux stated. Cunningham answered that he did. Devereux then stated that he did not feel he should make the decision to surrender, that Cunningham, the commander of the island, should decide. Pausing for a moment, Cunningham then told Devereux that he authorized surrender, and to take the necessary steps to carry it out. Uncertain of his ability to contact the Japanese commander, Devereux asked Cunningham to attempt to make contact with the enemy, as well. Cunningham responded: “I’ll see what I can do.”



At 1015 Kliewer saw men carrying a white flag coming down the beach. Major Devereux was among them, with a group of what appeared to be Japanese officers. They stopped about 50 feet from Kliewer’s trench and ordered him to surrender. Kliewer’s men counseled against giving up: “Don’t surrender, lieutenant. The Marines never surrender. It’s a hoax.”

“It was a difficult thing to do,” Kliewer wrote later, “but we tore down our guns and turned ourselves over.”

Some will argue that technically, Marines did not surrender at Wake, because the Navy commander ordered it. A similar argument is made when referencing Guam or the Marine surrender (under the command of an Army general) in the Philippines. But that doesn’t explain away Marines attempting to surrender during the little-known Makin Island Raid, though they were unsuccessful after being unable to find any Japanese to surrender to.

Further, there are other occasions where Marines have surrendered throughout the service’s history in this book by historian Albert Nofi, including the 40 Marines of “Task Force Drysdale” who surrendered to the Chinese during the Battle of the Chosin Reservoir in Korea.

“We are not surrendering because you beat us,” Marine Maj. John McLaughlin told the Chinese, according to HistoryNet. “We are surrendering to get our wounded cared for. If we can’t get our wounded evacuated, we will fight on.”

3. The birthday of the modern U.S. Marine Corps is on Nov. 10, 1775.

On Nov. 10, 1775, the Continental Congress in Philadelphia, Penn. authorized the raising of two battalions of Marines to serve “for and during the present war between Great Britain and the colonies.” Shortly after this resolution, Marines were recruited and served aboard ships, most notably as sharpshooters taking out enemy officers.

What many Marines don’t know however, is that the Continental Marine Corps was disbanded after the Revolutionary War in 1783 and ceased to exist for the next 15 years. It wasn’t until July 11, 1798 that what we know as the modern U.S. Marine Corps was established through an act of Congress.

For the next 123 years, the Corps recognized July 11, 1798 as its official birthday.

The U.S. Marine Corps History Division writes (emphasis added):

Until 1921 the birthday of the Corps had been celebrated on another date. An unidentified newspaper clipping from 1918 refers to the celebration of the 120th birthday of the Marine Corps on 11 July “as usual with no fuss.” It is doubtful that there was any real celebration at all. Further inspection of documents and publications prior to 1921 shows no evidence of ceremonies, pageants, or parties. The July date was commemorated between 1798 and 1921 as the birthday of the Corps. During the Revolution, Marines had fought on land and sea, but at the close of the Revolution the Marine Corps and the Navy were all but disbanded. On 11 July 1798, President John Adams approved a bill that recreated the Corps, thereby providing the rationale for this day being commemorated as the birthday of the U.S. Marine Corps.

It wasn’t until Nov. 1, 1921 with Gen. John A. Lejuene’s issued Marine Corps Order 47 that the birthday changed to the previous date for the Continental Marine Corps that modern Marines still celebrate today. Later this year on Nov. 10, 2015, the Marine Corps will celebrate 240 years of service, but we should really subtract 15 from that number.
4. Germans dubbed the Marines “devil dogs” during The Battle of Belleau Wood in World War I.

German soldiers facing American Marines at Belleau Wood, France during World War I took notice of their ferocious fighting spirit in battle, and they referred to them as teufelhunden, or “devil dogs,” according to Marine Corps legend. The Marine nickname of “devil dog” later appeared on a recruiting poster shortly after the battle.

But this claim also falls apart under closer scrutiny. Jeff Schogol, again writing in Stars & Stripes, spoke with a member of the Marine Corps History Division and a representative of the National Museum of the Marine Corps. Here’s what they said:

“The term very likely was first used by Marines themselves and appeared in print before the Battle for Belleau Wood,” Marine Corps History Divison’s Bob Aquilina said. “It gained notoriety in the decades following World War I and has since become a part of Marine Corps tradition.”

“We have no proof that it came from German troops though tradition says it came from German troops referring to Marines,” said museum rep Patrick Mooney. “There is no written document in German that says that the Marines are Devil Dogs or any correct spelling or language component of ‘Devil Dog’ in German.”

Further confusing the matter is the fact that a number of American newspapers ran stories in April 1918 claiming that Germans had nicknamed the Marines “devil dogs.” This was prior to the Battle of Belleau Wood, which began on June 1.

While not based in reality, it made for a compelling recruiting drive and the nickname still endures. “The Germans, during the war, had no opprobrious nicknames for their foes … Teufelhunde (devil-dogs), for the American Marines, was invented by an American correspondent; the Germans never used it,” wrote famed American author H.L. Mencken in his book on linguistics, “The American Language.”
159 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
1
1
0
So how did Lester Holt do tonight? Did he favor one candidate over the other? Or was he pretty fair?
Posted in these groups: Imgres President (POTUS)
4 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
2
2
0
264b437c
Maybe this is just me but I do not see any point besides that it is in the regulation that we wear our rank on the patrol caps in the army. You can clearly see the rank on the blouse or combat shirt depending on the situation. Although it gives you a second place to look for the rank it seems as if this could be changed. Why not your branch of the Army ie. medic, infantry, ordnance.
Posted in these groups: Clothing2 UniformsEa15e1cf Supply
30 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small