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Officer_
Before I joined the Army, I was taught to always say Sir or Ma'am.

From the date I entered the Army, via MP OSUT in 1980, I was always taught to always use the word Sir or Ma'am, when addressing an Officer, and never to address an officer by rank alone. I was taught if rank was used, so too should a name along with Sir or Ma'am.

Similarly, as an MP doing things like vehicle stops, I was again told initially address everyone by Sir or Ma'am, and you will never go wrong. Then if you determine someone has another rank or title, you can switch to whatever title is appropriate (Sir, Sergeant, 1SG etc.). I used this same philosophy for the MP Soldiers in my units throughout my career.

When I was commissioned, via OCS in 1985, I also was trained the same way - "Sir or Ma'am" and never by rank titles.

I have never addressed any senior officer by their title alone, nor would I ever.

I have always considered it be disrespectful for anyone to address me by rank alone, based on my upbringing. I see it as someone who can't bring themselves to say Sir, which I interpret as a lack of respect of the rank first, and/or me. I don't really get it, as I have no issue saying Sir or Ma'am to any superior, military or civilian.

The only time I was ever personally referred to by rank (aside from what I laid out above) was by superiors... right before (or during) a butt chewing.

I raise this question now and here on RP, as this happened to me once again just this past weekend. I was in uniform (ACU) at a JROTC competition, and a Sergeant First Class from Missouri Army National Guard addressed me as "Colonel." Specifically .... "Good morning Colonel." I told him what I thought of that... for what it is/was worth. He was not feeling me.

Since 911, as an MP, I worked extensively with the Army National Guard and Reserve (75% of the MP Regiment is in the Guard/Reserve) , as well all branches of the Armed Forces. It seems to me this is most common among NCOs in the National Guard, and then next would be the Air Force.

I have researched the regulations I could find, for my own edification, but I can find nothing definitive, aside from addressing Officers as Sir or Ma'am in passing, or when exchanging the great of the day.

I am interested in your thoughts and feelings on this, and I am interested in hearing from all ranks. Thank you all for your service.

Hooah.
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11B Infantry seem to be MOS that have a lot of similarities with 19D counterparts. While 19Ds perform recon for mainly armored units, they still at times go on foot and perform similar tasks such as route clearance and raids. However modern warfare seems to be changing and new technology seem to be slowly pushing boots on the ground out as essential need in favor of drones and other recon devices.
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Command Post What is this?
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C483ed23
Very recently in my community there was a tragedy on the high school gridiron. A 16 year old high school junior, attending an off season football strength and conditioning camp, was struck in the head while participating in a Navy SEAL-like teamwork, strength and endurance drill with a 10 foot long "telephone pole" type wooden log.

There are few specific details publicly available, only that it happened while five boys, including the victim, were participating in the drill and that the victim was said to be in the middle of the group and the boys were raising the log over their heads. Was the grass wet? Did the boys lose their grip?

In any case, the boy was struck in the head during the morning workout. He was pronounced dead at a local hospital. The same hospital where all five of my children were born, now ages 21 - 8.

"Can you imagine," my wife said after learning of the tragedy, "dropping your child off in the morning at a place you would think he would be safe, and then getting a telephone call that he had died?" I cannot.

This part of Long Island is no stranger to high school football fatalities. Less than three years ago another young man, who was playing in a local regular season high school football game collided with an opponent, head on, collapsed and then died from his head injury.

As a former football player and athletic administrator, I can tell you that head injuries and injuries in general are a painful reminder that we can never be "too safe." I remember vividly a rainy night football game played on natural turf, where the field conditions were less than desirable, and within five minutes of each other two players were removed from the field with broken bones. It happens that quick, and without warning.

But there is something different about this fatal injury.

U.S. Navy SEAL training techniques have become more and more popular as slowly over the past several years, the Navy SEALs have become more and more demystified through movies and books that take us inside the elite group's training and performance methods.

The Log Drill is a series of physically, mentally and emotionally challenging maneuvers in which a team of about five men perform these drills with a log weighing approximately 250 pounds. If everybody does their share, that's 50 pounds each.

When was the last time you lifted 50 pounds over your head? Could you lift 50 pounds over your head? Why would you lift 50 pounds over your head? What part of playing football requires a player to lift 50 pounds over his head?

Yes, these are strapping young men, strong, with endurance and fortitude, being taught how to work as a team, the hard way.

As an athletic administrator for public school programs on Long Island, I emphasized to coaches that the student athletes who chose to participate in their programs did so because they enjoyed playing the sport. I told the coaches that it was vital to remember that their student athletes were kids and not adults, no matter how much like men they looked, and not to treat them like college or professional athletes. It would have never occurred to me to tell them not to treat them like elite warriors.

I encouraged my coaches to study child psychology and to employ those principles in their coaching style. I encouraged my coaches to "Always make practice fun." "End each practice with a fun activity, so that they go home happy and wanting more, and feeling good about themselves." Drill and kill makes for unhappy players.

In the professions of physical education and athletic coaching safety must always be the first consideration. Physical educators are trained to always inspect the gym or teaching space and the supplies and equipment to be used prior to teaching their lesson. Good coaches do the same. But at what point does common sense kick in? At what point do you say to yourself, "Gee, I wonder what would happen if one, just one of these boys slipped and the 250 pound log came crashing down one of their heads?"

We call what happened a "tragedy" because it is a classic example of what a tragedy is. Some call it a "tragic accident." Some will call it negligent. And that will be for the police and lawyers to figure out. But those of us with military experience (I served 22 years in the Army, as an enlisted Combat Medic and then as a Medical Service Corps officer) know that a dead soldier is an ineffective soldier. So we teach and train safety first, especially out of the combat zone. In the combat zone, we say "Mission First, Safety Always!"

As soldiers, we knew what we did was inherently dangerous, and could cost us our life, limb or eyesight. But in a civilian setting, where children are involved and looking up to and trusting the adults around them who are legally in loco parentis ("In place of the parent"), to keep them safe and healthy as a parent would, my opinion is that there is never an excuse for potentially putting their life at risk for the purpose of team building, conditioning or any other reason. Nothing we do as adults responsible for the health, safety and welfare of a child should ever potentially cost them their life.

We are deceived by the size and athleticism of today's young student athletes. We forget that our public school interscholastic education programs are just that, interscholastic education, and not life or death scenarios.

Coaching egos and over training have taken the place of always doing what's in the best interest of the student athlete. We allow false dreams of college and professional success and fame to cloud better judgement as more and more youth's who participate in athletics are tracked to one sport over another, with year round training and travel leagues. Less than 1 percent of high school athletes ever play on a college scholarship. Less than 1 percent of college players ever play in the pros. And the average career in the pros lasts only from 3-5 years.

Football is the modern equivalent of war in the minds of some. We "Fight, fight, fight!" "Kill, kill, kill!" "Rip 'em apart!" Believe me, when General George S. Patton, in a speech to his troops during WWII implored his men to grease the wheels of their tanks with the guts of the enemy, he wasn't talking to teenagers preparing to play a game.

The rhetoric and techniques used by youth coaches need to be developmentally appropriate. I've had coaches disciplined for inappropriate language, tobacco use and other behavior detrimental to the proper development of young student athletes, yet on any given day you could walk through even a youth league practice and shouldn't be surprised the hear things that would make your mother blush.

Foul language and Navy SEAL drills don't grow hair on the chests of young men. Using fun cooperative games, sports and activities leads to better teamwork and leadership skills than making them put a 250 pound log over their heads.

Youth leaders need to work smarter and not harder. Even the pros are reconsidering bulk work outs in favor of resistance training. Lean core fitness, speed and quickness drills, push-ups and sit-ups yield a far healthier and effective student athlete than over-working bodies and muscles to the point of musculoskeletal failure or injury. Form is more important than weight. When the body is tired and fatigued it is most susceptible to injury. Why didn't these "coaches" know this?

Last few points. In a local front page news article about this tragedy, public school athletics officials were quoted as saying there was "only one out of season practice rule" for interscholastic student athletes, that they not be forced to participate in out of season activities. That is in fact only half of the regulation. The other half is that out of season workouts need to be open to anyone.

This is from the New York State Public High Schools Athletic Association (NYSPHSAA), Inc., Bylaws and Eligibility Standards, page 130, Section 22. (NYSPHSAA is to governing body of New York State public high school athletics and is affiliated with the National Federation of State High School Athletic Associations (NFHS); the local governing body in Suffolk County, New York, where the tragedy occurred, and which answers to the state association is Section IX).

"c. School sponsored activities conducted out of the sport season such as general
conditioning, weight training, weight lifting, intramurals, recreation, open gyms, club
activities and camps are permitted: 1) if such programs are not mandated by coaches or
school personnel; 2) if such programs are available to all students.
"d. Non-school sponsored activities are permitted if such programs are not mandated by
coaches or school personnel. It is recommended that no school equipment be used for
these programs as per State Comptroller Opinion 85-37."

(Corrected from 8/12/17 version.) So a "non-school sponsored activity" (the strength and conditioning camp that contributed to the death of the 16 year old) can be mandated through a booster club, by non-affiliated coaches and trainers - just not the actual team coaches.

This off season work out had nothing to do with the school district's official activities. The booster club sponsored the activity. According to the article, each boy had to pay $325 for the camp. Since it was "non-curricular" the state law (New York State Commissioner's Regulation 135, Guidelines for the Coaching Requirements, pp. 48-73) requiring coaching certifications for anyone working with the student athletes in a scholastic setting didn't apply. There could be any nut case working with these boys who were hired by the booster club. And oh, by the way, the bulk of that $325 went to salaries for these fitness and conditioning "specialists." These things you won't find in the article.

Public school districts need to take a hard look at what activities they allow on their premises, and booster clubs need to hire licensed teachers and coaches for their extra season camps if they are going to use school facilities.

After this tragedy, if this was the case, there is no excuse for allowing non-certified coaches/trainers to work with public school student athletes, ever. If a parent wants to seek out a "professional" trainer for their child on their own, that's their business, but for public schools to allow and facilitate it is unconscionable. If a "trainer's" only qualification is that they were a Navy SEAL, or college or professional athlete, an alumni perhaps with no other proper coaching qualifications or certifications, take a pass. No disrespect intended.

Intentions aside, without the proper training and coaching style, it's only a matter of time before tragedy or negligence strikes again.
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B00cca27
I have had many uniforms. In 1980 it was green fatigues, then BDUs in 82/83... In AK we had wool shirts, pants, Arctic mittens, VB boots, Mukluks, the 3 piece parka, and over-whites... Vietnam era Jungle Fatigues at Ranger school... Chocolate chip DBUs... 3 color DBUs... Multi-cams... Dress Greens, Blues, ASUs, The ACU Digital... ACU - OCP... The SWAT suit was the goofiest... or Polizei?
Posted in these groups: Untitled Memories4276e14c Uniforms
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4dd5d676
What would have made it easier? What really worked? Please make suggestions to help others find real answers.
Posted in these groups: Enjoying_life_logo Enjoying LifeBeachbody-coach-success-club SuccessRetirement_logo Retirement
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"(Unit Name withheld) BCT ordered to remove combat patches during training at Fort NoMatter so the ones without them don't get ‪‎hurt feelings‬.

Reason? "The unit just returned from Afghanistan and almost everyone has a patch but the large influx of new soldiers are E1 and E2s that have never deployed and they are saying they are left out because they don't have a patch."
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I feel as if I’m speaking to a Master Sergeant, Sergeant First Class or Staff Sergeant, they need to be addressed as their full rank and not “Sergeant.”
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C2cace61
What groups and organizations are active? Is there a website with events on it? Which ones are best?

Just looking to find veteran social groups and meet some new people. Any and all types of groups would be much appreciated!
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Posted in these groups: Us-medals AwardsAmerican-flag-soldiers Soldiers
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C527af57
The US Special Forces have a phrase that's spoken over the radio when a firefight is going badly or when courage needs to be summoned. They call out - tango mike mike. If you every heard this you were more than likely in the hurt and know this - however this is the history behind its meaning.

http://www.garfieldsteamhouse.org/History/Vietnam/TangoMikeMike-RoyBenavidez.php
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A169e8e1
This question is for our Vietnam era Veterans here on RallyPoint. Share with us what your feelings were when you first received and opened your draft notice.

What was your stance on the war? Explain your opinion

Did your parents put ideas into your head about the war that you didn't nessisarly believe in?
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Clarification: The question is about the impact on healthcare cost of routine barrage of threats that give rise to concern on the part of many citizens that their quality of life will be destroyed by discrimination sanctioned by a president who directly and indirectly sanctions discriminatory behaviors that would have been unthinkable under any president since slavery was abolished and women and minorities were granted right to vote. Fear of discriminatory acts is rampant.

The New PTSD: Post-Trump Stress Disorder
http://www.alternet.org/personal-health/new-ptsd-post-trump-stress-disorder

n.b. In spite of Trump's campaign promise to dismantle Obama's ACA - it would appear that he will retain most major portions of the ACA - including those portions guaranteeing coverage for previously uninsurable patients - and coverage for pre-existing conditions for otherwise insurable patients. The point of retaining these rather costly provisions of the ACA is to collect insurance premiums from patients whose care would otherwise fall to free government subsidized federal block grant supported community hospital / clinic care programs.
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E859ad5d
Leaders,

I conducted a barracks inspection today. One of my Soldiers, not white, had a modified rebel flag hanging in his room. On it was an eagle and written "these colors don't run".
While common sense to some says this probably shouldn't be there, is there anything that specifically says yes or no. AR 600-15, para 2-4 says a commander can have certain flags and etc removed to maintain good order and discipline.
Who or what determines that this is a violation. What may be offensive to some may not be to others, religion, heritage, etc. Your thoughts?
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Ff6b7fb1
Currently, retention bonuses are taxed at 25% (3% less than regular taxed income).
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I've been in the reserves as a 68w (medic) for just over three years. I just signed a contract for active duty for another three, I leave in less than a week for Ft Drum. I've been working on my PT and trying to brush up on my MARCH/TC3 since the reserves hasn't had much to offer in the way of training or experience. If anyone has any advice for a reservist going regular I would appreciate it.
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02a4ba53
Every time I returned a salute, it was a reminder of my responsibilities to every subordinate. For those who don't like saluting junior officers, it may help if you try to view it as reminding that young officer of their responsibility.
Posted in these groups: Customs_and_courtesies_logo Customs and Courtesies
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