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In today's speech to the American Governors - Trump offered to provide a 10% increase in the military's budget - but also stated that “We never win wars anymore. We never fight to win. We have to start winning wars again.”

“We have to start winning wars again — when I was young, in high school and college, people used to say we never lost a war. We need to win or don’t fight it all. It’s a mess like you have never seen before.”

What does it mean to fulfill Trump's dream of winning wars mean in terms of the kind of intensive ground and air battle required to defeat and eradicate ISIS? What does it mean for US military personnel to assume the responsibility for and personally "start winning wars" in the Middle East, South China Sea, Eastern Europe, North Korea, etc?

We have tried on many occasions to build coalitions and/or to rely on local indigenous troops to assume responsibility for the defense of our foreign allies. Instead, what does it mean for US Service Men and Service Women to assume responsibility for "winning" - and does that mean for us to invade, hold territory, and loot their oil and other natural resources - as has been repeatedly suggested by Trump on a number of occasions in the past?

Warmest Regards, Sandy :)

n.b. All this from a man who graduated New York Military Academy in 1968 at age 22, 6' 2" tall, the picture of health, had an athletic build, played football, tennis and squash; and was taking up golf. In an interview with The New York Times last month, Mr. Trump said he had bone spurs — a "temporary" and “minor” malady that had no meaningful impact on him. He paid a doctor who to provided a letter for draft officials enabling him to dodge the draft.
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I think I was one of the local guinea pigs for the VA Choice Program last spring when I was authorized six visits with a dermatologist. There were some issues which needed to be worked through but the doctors office and VA Choice Program seemed to work things out.
Things got weird this year. I received a bill for biopsy result pathology from a lab. I called them and they indicated TRICARE rejected it since I am not part of TRICARE [yet]. I told them it was authorized by the VA and they should bill the VA. After 75 minutes on the phone with VA Choice [mostly on hold] I learned that the issue was that I may not have been authorized for a biopsy and the doctor should have requested authorization for a biopsy before performing any. That blew me away since the appointment was authorized to assess me for psoriasis and skin cancer.
Has anybody else had any weird experiences recently? I hope not and I really hope the VA Choice Program is running much better now.
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Would you standby and do nothing because you think "It's freedom of speech" or would you properly dispose of it according to Title 18 U.S. Code subsection 700?
Posted in these groups: Respect__logo RespectZgvwznrr9psdw5lzq6y7ihp6r9qhpdfhlbomkkkntap1slsxqwsblel-onis9qdww00l_q_s85 Disrespect
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I served in both the NG and active duty as a 68W and I've been in a total of 3 years, going on 4. I worked Ems on the civilian side and I can say with confidence that I do not want to make a career out of it. My end goal is physician assistant, but I believe becoming a Charlie would benefit me. The reason being is because it puts me in a clinical setting much more frequently than being a medic allows. It's also a better life as an enlisted soldier. What do you all think?
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I have recruiters calling and asking me for my interest in their branch. I don't have experience in any branch besides Marines. A little bit of information regarding the culture and customs of each branch would be extremely helpful. I'm interested in the USAF because they have more jobs (I'd like intel, CI or area study) and have plenty more resources that are updated and better.
Posted in these groups: B04bb539 MarinesRecruitMilitary3916126932_armedforces_xlarge Branch
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I'm enlisted in the US Army as 68w I know you can get stationed anywhere, but my question is what are the odds of what I actually do?I know there is hospital, clinic, line medic ect But I was curious if anyone could quantify what exactly is the most likely thing I'll be doing ?
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So my basic training will be at Ft Sill and ive done tons of research on basic to prepare myself best as i can, but my question is what kind of privileges do you get in AIT vs basic? and has anyone gone to Sill for basic and how is the base? Curiosity and all
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Should we concerned about Man’s hoard of nearly 5,000 guns shows ease of amassing arms in U.S.?

I believe in the 2nd Amendment, but isn't this a little too much? Your thoughts RP Members? Check out the video

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-guns-stockpile-insight-idUSKBN0TM2LU20151204

As sheriff’s investigators threaded past the battered cars, cast-off tires and rusted farm equipment cluttering Brent Nicholson’s front yard, there was no hint of the sinister stockpile hidden behind his windowless front door.

Inside, the guns were everywhere: rifles and shotguns piled in the living room, halls and bedrooms; handguns littering tables and countertops. Outside, when they rolled up the door on the pre-fab metal garage, more arms spilled out at their feet.

“This has completely changed our definition of an ass-load of guns,” said Chesterfield County Sheriff Jay Brooks. Six weeks after the discovery, officers are still cataloging the weapons, many of which have proved stolen, and the final tally is expected to be close to 5,000. “I don’t know if there’s ever been (a seizure) this big anywhere before,” Brooks says.

The question of how one man amassed such a stockpile of guns arises just as there is renewed American soul-searching over the widespread availability of firearms in the wake of a series of mass shootings.
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Barracks inspections in USAEUR are now required daily. Is this too intrusive? How deep should the inspection go and at what times?
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Fatigue, battledress and other work and combat uniforms had subdued rank most of the time. Some ranks are very distinctive such as Captain [double bars], Colonel [eagle], and General Officer [black star or multiple]. However 1st LT and Warrant Officer looked very close and sometimes Majors and Lieutenant Colonels looked very close especially in the rain, snow, etc.
When I was a private in the 1970s I couldn't tell sometimes if a LT or a Chief Warrant Officer was approaching me. I would salute usually and wasn't sure at that time if I was supposed to salute Warrant Officers.
Did you have trouble recognizing officer rank?
Posted in these groups: Rank RankCf1cbe80 Troops
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I'm a highschool senior and I decided that joining that army would be a great first step to a great career. I've taken the asvab, scored an 85, but not the dlab. I wanted to do civil affairs but found out you had to be reclassified as an E4 or above. Being a 35M looked interesting so I'm wondering if enlisting as a 35M, going to airborne school and the DLI, then reclassing as a 38B is a good idea. Also any advice on what you should make sure is on your contract before signing or what it's like being in either MOS is welcomed.
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Apologies for my terrible English. Here is the question broken down and explained in what I hope is in better terms.
The situation is that a soldier was given a false pt score by a previous NCO for whatever reasons that he had. The soldier has now changed duty stations and was promoted to Sgt rank. She has not been pinned yet but took a diagnostic pt test and failed the pt test. Now the question is being raised about her really having a 300 pt score and she is scared and has been scared to say anything about the changing of her records. My question is what can she do as for this to not effect her career in a negative way? Especially in light of her not declining the promotion. I do understand that myself knowing what is going on and not saying anything can put me in the same boat as her. I know the wrong answer is to not say anything but what's the best way to go about doing something if anything to minimize the amount of damage done to her or multiple people's careers?
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I try to give back to the people of this nation as I am able. I used to donate blood regularly; but because I was stationed in Germany in the early 1980's when some beef in military mess halls came from cows with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) [Mad Cow] I can no longer donate blood because we have become infected with Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, Variant (vCJD); "Mad Cow Disease." I learned recently that people with HIV can now donate blood - per conversation with Red Cross POC, efforts were funded to come up with a way that HIV positive people can donate blood. That saddened me and made me mad. Bovine spongiform can only be tested through autopsy right now. Many of those of us who served in Europe during the latter part of the cold war have not been able to donate blood. I hope that NIH will make in a priority and obtain funding to develop ways to test for bovine spongiform in people through a blood test.
[Note: I updated the question from "veterans" to "Veterans and service members" on June 6, 2015 - 71st anniversary of D Day - Operation Overlord]

[update May 18, 2018] As of 2017, worldwide 230 people, roughly 180 in the UK have been infected with vCJD and 4 people in the USA have been infected.

Mad Cow and VCJD are nervous system diseases which are based on diseased prions [not the car]. Diseased prions binds to proteins and converts them to prions.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pxojz6grwcU

Thanks to SFC (Join to see) for alerting me that "there is progress in the development of methods to detect misfolded proteins in the bloodstream" I did research and found the following at an NIH site.
As this article informs us there has been progress in control groups testing of "developed blood tests to detect prion." The article states that there are plans to "validate their methods using larger samples sizes."
Hopefully this process will be successful to detect whether or not we have been infected by Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, Variant (vCJD); "Mad Cow Disease."


"Prion diseases are a group of rare, fatal brain diseases that affect animals and humans. They are caused by normally harmless proteins that become abnormal and form clumps in the brain. One form, called variant CJD (vCJD), is associated with eating meat from cattle infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy, commonly known as “mad cow” disease.

People may have vCJD for years before symptoms—such as depression, hallucinations, moving difficulties, and dementia—appear. These “silent” carriers have small amounts of prions in their bloodstreams and can transmit the disease to others via blood transfusions. The only current method to diagnose vCJD is to perform a biopsy or a postmortem analysis of brain tissue. Thus, a noninvasive test to detect prions in blood is a medical priority.

Two research groups recently developed blood tests to detect prions. The results appeared in a pair of papers published on December 21, 2016, in Science Translational Medicine. One of the groups, led by Dr. Claudio Soto of the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, was funded in part by NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS).

Prions are scarce in the bloodstream and difficult to measure. Both teams developed methods to amplify the prions in blood samples using a technique called protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA). PMCA relies on the characteristic nature of prions to cause certain healthy proteins to clump abnormally and convert into prions.

Soto’s group first combined healthy proteins with known concentrations of infectious vCJD prions. They intermittently agitated these mixtures with sound waves. The agitation helped break the prions into smaller chunks. This increased the number of prions that could then convert healthy proteins into prions. Using this method, the scientists were able to detect more than a billion-fold dilution of prions using an anti-prion antibody.

The scientists next tested whether the technique could be used to detect prions in blood samples from 14 people with vCJD and 153 controls. The controls included healthy people as well as people with different neurological or neurodegenerative disorders, including sporadic CJD, the most common form of CJD. The assay flagged all the vCJD samples correctly.

In the second paper, a French research group described a similar approach testing a blinded panel of blood samples. That team identified 18 vCJD patients in a group of 256 samples.

“Our findings, which need to be confirmed in further studies, suggest that our method of detection could be useful for the noninvasive diagnosis of this disease in pre-symptomatic individuals,” Soto says. Early diagnosis would allow potential therapies to be tested before substantial brain damage occurred. This technique would also allow blood contaminated with prions to be detected and removed from the blood supply.

Both teams are now working to validate their methods using larger samples sizes.
―by Anita Ramanathan
nih.gov/news-events/nih-research-matters/new-method-accurately-detects-prions-blood



~793507:LTC Bill Koski] CW5 (Join to see) MSG Brad Sand SGM Steve Wettstein SSG(P) James J. Palmer IV aka "JP4" SP5 Mark Kuzinski SrA Christopher Wright PO1 William "Chip" Nagel PO1 John Miller SP5 Robert Ruck SPC (Join to see) PO3 Steven Sherrill SN Greg Wright Capt Marty Hogan SCPO Morris Ramsey TSgt Joe C. Cpl Joshua Caldwell SGT Michael Thorin SP5 Dave (Shotgun) Shockley SPC Margaret Higgins
Posted in these groups: Ems MedicalCf1cbe80 TroopsD48af888 AirmenC8005900 Sailors
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I remember pay call while being stationed in Bamberg, Germany in the early 1980's. I think pay call was only used for forces stationed overseas [expect that includes all Navy vessels as well] where a choice of currency to receive your pay made sense. Pay call made sense when many service members did not have direct deposit for their salary. I don't know if pay call still exists and where it is used.

[Update July 19] I was an infantry training company commander in 1985 and 1986 so the soldiers under my command [IET soldiers] had pay call and I am pretty sure they were strongly encouraged to get direct deposit. I don't remember if the National Guard soldiers had to switch to direct deposit after they finished infantry one station unit training (OSUT) or if they were exempted because they were not going to be on active duty.

Images: Marines 2nd Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company Pay Call;
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My motivation is to mentor and develop the next generation.
Posted in these groups: Selfless-service Selfless ServiceGeneration
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We've all repeated them, quoted them, and re-watched a favorite movie just to see them again... yes, we're talking about those defining military-related movie lines! In a few other threads we've discussed various military movie-related topics, so the idea here is a thread dedicated specifically to those iconic and infectious "movie lines" that seem to make their way into our daily conversations. It could be something profound, catchy, interesting/ thought provoking, or just plain entertaining or funny. It could have been from a movie that was military-related, military-themed, or something else altogether... but is somehow applicable to the military experience or life from the military perspective. The sky is the limit here, so dig deep and let's hear your best-of-the-best military-related movie lines! Now, fasten your seat-belts and let's get this thing started; thank you for all that you do, and... see you all in the discussion threads!  
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<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; When I speak to NCO's and even some Officers about attempting to Commision, I am often asked, "why do you want to go to the dark side?" I do not understand why it is looked at so negatively that myself, or others&nbsp;do not want to continue a&nbsp;career path on the Enlisted side of the house. </p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I personally believe I have talents more suited in the Officer Corps.&nbsp;Having Enlisted with a BA in Business Administration with a concentration in Management, and almost two years through my first contract.&nbsp;I am a little more qualifed to Commision than some new Undergrads fresh out of college and hot&nbsp;off the street. I would just like some clarification on this practice of questioning, and demeaning someones career path outlook.</p><p>--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>I see things getting a little off topic, the things being said are not affecting myself, but how is this influencing others? Acknowleding that this is happening is the first step in a possible way to correct it. Are we as leaders becoing additional barriers in our juniors careers by not fully supporting them when they seek advice, directly or indirectly? </p><p>--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Since this topic is picking up steam once again, this is an informational question for future JSM's whom might be seeking guidance. I am about 60% sure I will be getting out of service after my first term (at least that's how I feel right now). Please offer your guidance for those now and in the future.
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We've all been in different Division where we had to sing the Division Song right after Reveille. Which one will always be your favorite and will always remember, no matter where you go?
Posted in these groups: F811e08a MusicBigstock-motivational-concept-got-mot-30228101 MotivationPride_logo Pride
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