Posted on Jul 16, 2019
Airlift/Special Mission Aircraft Maintenance
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Here's one just for fun. Active duty guys, would you rather be deployed alongside reservists or national guardsmen? Are there any good reasons that set one apart from the other? Or are they both equally as good (or bad)?
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Responses: 15
SFC Patient Service Tech
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I've been on both fences of this yard. I've been Active. I've been Reserves. I've worked with all three components in all types of situations/missions/theaters. Each one brings to the table some very important skill sets. And each one brings to the table some not so desirable traits. I personally don't care what component they are....as long as they get the job done right.
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CW5 Jack Cardwell
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I have been active and I have been Guard. The thing the Guard brings to the game is skill sets beyond MOS which come in handy while deployed. Carpenters, electrians, plumbers, master welders, mechanics, law enforcement officers, and many others.
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CW5 Jack Cardwell
CW5 Jack Cardwell
12 mo
MAJ Byron O. often soldiers are offered Reserve component or Active schools, I always said first available, so I mainly attended Active duty schools.
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SSG Environmental Specialist
SSG (Join to see)
12 mo
MAJ Byron O. - The POI for reserve course such as NCO development is the same as the active, the main difference is at least on the reserve side the school day is longer to get all the material in and allot of night studying
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SFC Vet Technician
SFC (Join to see)
12 mo
MAJ Byron O. - That is absolutely untrue with the (fairly) recently adoption on STEP program. There was a time, back in the middle 2000's, during the surge when there was slightly abbreviated course for NG/RC. However the MOS-specific material was maintained in favor of things like drill and ceremony and other garrison leadership skills. Additionally, the NG/RC course went 7 days/week and often 10-12 hours in order to condense the time; Active courses were longer, but included weekends without instruction, or minimal instruction

The Army adopted a one-Army training model and use the same POI, often with mixed component classes. The main difference is the use of phases. Part time Soldiers usually have the option of breaking up the course load in20 3 or 3 week segments.
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CPT Lawrence Cable
CPT Lawrence Cable
12 mo
MAJ Byron O. - When I branch transferred when I moved to Kentucky, my Engineer Officer Advanced Course was two weeks, a correspondence phase and then a final two weeks to complete the course. I worked with both Guard and Active Engineer units afterwards, I never felt handicapped and just as a general observation would be that my Engineer Company would have ran rings around most of the active duty ones I have been associated. Most of that comes down to the fact that most of my guys did something related in civilian world, so my mechanics, operators, and demo guys had years more experience than some E-5 with four years in service.
Can't say the same about Infantry units, but it's simply that the National Guard training schedule doesn't have time to do large operations. My observation of Guard Infantry units is that they are generally decent at the Squad, Platoon and even Company level, but lack experience above that level.
The Air Force has done a much better job of integrating their Guard and Reserve assets.
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SFC Jim Mergott
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Having been active and guard I feel National Guard troops in general have more job skillets and are more “street smart” about life. This gives them the ability to think out of the box.This is their advantage. However they are not nearly as disciplined and most likely their general fighting skillsets will not be as sharp as an active duty unit. Having said this I would want to deploy with Guard troops over reservists because the guard is more combat oriented than Reserves.
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SFC Quinn Chastant
SFC Quinn Chastant
12 mo
Many Army Reserve Units in the Pacific Territories are also Combat Arms units. While the major reorganisation in the 1990's steered Combat Arms to the NG and Support Operations to the AR, the Pacific region was one that did not fall under the National Guard Bureau. My Active Duty time saw me in Air Defense Artillery, Maintenance, and Combat Engineers due to a demand MOS. while in ADA I was part of a Recon Team (RSOP), and as part of the training for that squad tactics were heavily trained. So in actually you may get a mixed bag of skillsets. Cheers.
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