Posted on Apr 8, 2016
CW2 Electronics Missile Technician
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SFC Randy Purham
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I think you mean presence. But, its all subjective. Meaning, it depends on the capacity of the job they are doing. Some leadership get hung up on emails and meetings because that's how the organization is ran. But to directly answer your question:

What is being done in the motor pool after Tuesday if Command Maintenance is done on Monday and 5988s are scrubbed and faults are corrected/parts are on order? Is there any serious work being done that requires the NCO's presence? If the E6 - squad leader is busy is there not an E5 or high-speed E4 there to drive the train in the motor pool? This is where proactive and delegation in leadership fail. Most NCOs feel like they have to be everywhere or involved in everything that happens in that unit/squad/section when encouraging, delegating, and trusting our Junior Enlisted/Younger NCOs to do the job and back brief us at the appropriate time.

To better understand your question or issue can you elaborate? Here in Ft. Detrick, motor pools don't exist. So, this is coming from a different perspective. Even in my previous unit, I didn't spend much time in the mo-po because my E5s and E4s didn't want me there. But things got done beyond standards.
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CW2 Electronics Missile Technician
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I've been places where 1SG's, Platoon SGT's and Commanders come spot check the motorpool just because they want to see the soldiers that drive their organization.
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SGT J M Porters
SGT J M Porters
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If I could say something and that is the power of duplication. What we look for are take charge leaders. Everyone has different styles of management. There are the Micro manger who have to approve and over see everything. Then there are those who put you in charge and train you to run and make decision.
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Maj John Bell
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E-mail and cell phones did not exist while I was in. I personally cannot fathom using them during the "work day". As a Plt Ldr, paperwork was done by the Plt Guide and Plt House mouse; as a Company Commander, by the Company XO, and Company clerk. My desk was the clip board the company clerk carried papers on to get my signature.

The only time I was in my office as a unit commander was to get a cup of coffee in the morning or a uniform change. I had competent subordinates, so I didn't have to talk much, but I and the Senior SNCO at my command level, were always watching, inspecting, and counseling. We even ate morning meal and lunch together in the chow hall when the unit was in garrison. 99% of our leadership training was provided one on one. (That is not a euphemism for an ass chewing, it was legitimate critiques or "attaboys" to NCO's as appropriate)
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CW4 Tim Claus
CW4 Tim Claus
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Leadership involves ensure those you are entrusted to lead see that you care, are engaged, and have a general, if not specific, understanding of what is required in the various skills required for a unit to function. You may not have to know how to cook for large groups, or replace a clutch, but you need to show them you know they are important, and ensure those that are carrying out those tasks understand you appreciate the effort they out forth every day for their fellow soldiers. Leadership is ensuring all parts of a unit understand they are critical to the mission, valuable parts of the team, and get them engaged and committed to successful teamwork. That cannot be done by email, smart phone, or with wishes. It takes effort and work every day until that level of concern and engagement becomes second nature.
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SSG Charles Lovelace
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This is a double edged sword. Leaders need to get out of the 9 to 5 mentality period. When their troops are training or maintaining they should have some influence on what is going on. While I have no issue with delegation, Soldiers need to recognize that their NCO's are just as willing to get dirty and work as they are willing to sit down and respond to emails
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