Posted on May 24, 2015
SGT Infantryman (Airborne)
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There continues to be much anecdotal evidence regarding the benefits of service dogs for treating PTSD. Nevertheless, the VA does not provide service dogs for physical or mental health conditions, including PTSD. Sure, the VA is researching the benefits of canine therapy in treating PTSD, but Veterans must find organizations willing to support Veterans.

A golden-haired pup named Tuesday gleefully walked through the Performing Arts Center at Crafton Hills College as his human, Army veteran Luis Carlos Montalván, asked him to perform tasks for the hundreds in the audience.
“We’ve been together for six years. Oh boy, what a six years it has been. Never would I have imagined we’d be speaking here in front of you in Yucaipaa. It’s amazing,” he said.
Montalván had enlisted in the Army at the age of 17, and had his first tour of duty in the 1990s. Seventeen years later and after multiple combat tours in Iraq, Montalván’s military career came to a close. Leaving a life he had wanted to experience before he “could even remember” left him suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.
Montalván was introduced to Tuesday to help him cope with the realities of wartime and the events following. The two have become inseparable. So much so that Montalván wrote a memoir about his experiences with the pup in 2011 titled, “Until Tuesday: A Wounded Warrior and the Golden Retriever Who Saved Him.” The book became a New York Times best-seller.
“When people talk to Tuesday and me about joining the military, I tell them the truth — there’s good and there’s bad. (My opinion) is not from some bitter part of me or extraordinary biased thing, though it could be. In fact, we encourage people to serve.” Montalván spoke for close to an hour addressing a number of subjects while keeping things age appropriate as there were dozens of children in the audience.
After his speech, Montalván fielded questions from the audience and signed copies of “Until Tuesday” and his newest book, a children’s book, titled, “Tuesday Tucks Me In: The Loyal Bond Between a Soldier and His Service Dog.” Tuesday, with his reassuring looks and expressive eyes, was by Montalván’s side the entire presentation.
“Tuesday is my best friend,” Montalván said. “Tuesday helps me out every minute, every hour, every day because he’s a pack animal and he wants to see his pack doing well. If I’m not feeling OK, Tuesday will do something to make me feel better. And how great is a hug from your best friend that loves you unconditionally?” Read more: Veteran Luis Carlos Montalván talks PTSD, animal therapy with his dog Tuesday
Army Veteran Montalván is just one of a number of stories of how Veterans have found new meaning in caring for and the friendship of a dog to help him recover his life. Shouldn’t the VA wake-up and endorse canine therapy?

There continues to be much anecdotal evidence regarding the benefits of service dogs for treating PTSD. Nevertheless, the VA does not provide service dogs for physical or mental health conditions, including PTSD. Sure, the VA is researching the benefits of canine therapy in treating PTSD, but Veterans must find organizations willing to support Veterans. A golden-haired pup named Tuesday gleefully walked through the Performing Arts Center at Crafton Hills College as his human, Army veteran Luis Carlos Montalván, asked him to perform tasks for the hundreds in the audience. “We’ve been together for six years. Oh boy, what a six years it has been. Never would I have imagined we’d be speaking here in front of you in Yucaipaa. It’s amazing,” he said. Montalván had enlisted in the Army at the age of 17, and had his first tour of duty in the 1990s. Seventeen years later and after multiple combat tours in Iraq, Montalván’s military career came to a close. Leaving a life he had wanted to experience before he “could even remember” left him suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Montalván was introduced to Tuesday to help him cope with the realities of wartime and the events following. The two have become inseparable. So much so that Montalván wrote a memoir about his experiences with the pup in 2011 titled, “Until Tuesday: A Wounded Warrior and the Golden Retriever Who Saved Him.” The book became a New York Times best-seller. “When people talk to Tuesday and me about joining the military, I tell them the truth — there’s good and there’s bad. (My opinion) is not from some bitter part of me or extraordinary biased thing, though it could be. In fact, we encourage people to serve.” Montalván spoke for close to an hour addressing a number of subjects while keeping things age appropriate as there were dozens of children in the audience. After his speech, Montalván fielded questions from the audience and signed copies of “Until Tuesday” and his newest book, a children’s book, titled, “Tuesday Tucks Me In: The Loyal Bond Between a Soldier and His Service Dog.” Tuesday, with his reassuring looks and expressive eyes, was by Montalván’s side the entire presentation. “Tuesday is my best friend,” Montalván said. “Tuesday helps me out every minute, every hour, every day because he’s a pack animal and he wants to see his pack doing well. If I’m not feeling OK, Tuesday will do something to make me feel better. And how great is a hug from your best friend that loves you unconditionally?” Read more: Veteran Luis Carlos Montalván talks PTSD, animal therapy with his dog Tuesday Army Veteran Montalván is just one of a number of stories of how Veterans have found new meaning in caring for and the friendship of a dog to help him recover his life. Shouldn’t the VA wake-up and endorse canine therapy?

http://sftt.org/blog/news/dog-therapy-and-treating-ptsd/
Posted in these groups: 392025c1 DogsScreen_shot_2015-03-15_at_2.13.20_pm PTSD
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PO1 John Miller
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SGT (Join to see), another great article. I do have one friend with PTSD who has a service dog and he says she has changed his life for the better more so than medication ever did.

He does have his bad days of course, but "Sadie" senses it and much like "Tuesday" gives him reassurance (hugs and kisses) to calm him down and help him carry on with his day.

One thing I would like to see, besides the VA endorsing service dogs and providing them to our veterans who need them. Not just for PTSD but in other instances where a service dog would be invaluable.

For instance, I have bad knees and eventually will need double knee replacement surgery. I do what I can to ease the pain, (mild exercise, watching my weight) but nevertheless I will eventually need the surgery. I already plan on getting a mobility assistance dog when that happens.
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SGT Infantryman (Airborne)
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PO1 John Miller, I would like the VA to offer a dog, just for the companionship. I hope it's a while before your knees give out. I'm having the same problem, but my knees are 70 years old. I had a wonderful dog and when I felt down all I had to do was be with Charlie. You can just feel the love between you and your dog. Charlie died about 10 years ago from cancer. I miss him to this day. He was the most gentle loving dog I've ever had. I had a dog in Vietnam, I called Trooper. He went on a few air assaults with me. I loved having him sit next to me in my gun well. It just made for a better day. Thank you for your post. The first picture is Charlie. The other is Trooper.
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SGT Infantryman (Airborne)
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PO1 John Miller
PO1 John Miller
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Great looking pups. There's this saying I like: "Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives complete."
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SPC Combat Engineer
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i love this program. We have a few in our community that I get to see frequently at our local military surplus store. As for me, my dog (which is not a certified service dog) tends to be able to tell when I'm having a rough day. She'll just come put her head in my lap and "make" me love on her, which, in turn, usually picks me up.
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SSG Gene Carroll SR.
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I have tree dogs, one a service dog and two companions. I would not take a trillion dollars for anyone of them. They are like my children now. And I don't want to loose them before my time.
May God keep watch over all our pets.
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