Posted on Oct 31, 2015
SFC Joe S. Davis Jr., MSM, DSL
9
9
0
A94b94d9
192d8ecb
In a Recent Armytimes Article dated 2 November 2015.

While most military recruits sign up for active or reserve component duty for three or four years, their enlistment contracts actually obligate them to a total service agreement of eight years. Troops who choose to hang up their uniforms short of eight years of service transition into the Individual Ready Reserve for the remainder of that commitment and serve as an emergency backup “force of last resort.”
The vast majority of IRR members are never called back to duty. But that could change in a big way if reserve advocates gain traction on a new plan to significantly overhaul how the IRR is managed. The goal is to make this historically disorganized component into a more integrated, reliable and useful part of the ‘total force’ in an era when the services are under pressure to reduce active-duty personnel strength and its associated high costs. The Reserve Forces Policy Board, a federal advisory group, has suggested that a revamped IRR might seek to tap inactive vets for a wider range of potentially short-term missions, creating a relationship similar to the private sector’s use of part-time consultants.

The board is calling for new laws and policies that would redefine the IRR and the role of more than 250,000 young veterans who do not drill regularly or receive pay but have prior military service and are committed to mobilize in the event of a crisis.
The push comes at a time when the military is shrinking, defense budgets remain tight and the Pentagon is looking for ways to modernize the all-volunteer force and tap new sources of talent. The IRR is “a pool of pre-trained, high-quality manpower that the American military has invested a lot of money in — and they are just sitting there,” Arnold Punaro, chairman of the Reserve Forces Policy Board, said in an interview.

“If we are looking at creating greater flexibility and maximizing the use of all talent, the IRR could playa very important role.”Punaro and the RFPB recently sent Defense Secretary Ash Carter a letter urging large-scale changes that could include: Improving official tracking of individual IRR troops and their skills by modernizing personnel data systems.

Possibly changing the laws governing when and how IRR troops are mobilized. Attaching IRR troops to traditional reserve units. Offering IRR troops access to some level of Tricare health coverage and retirement benefits. Allowing IRR troops to freeze their high-year-tenure clocks to incentivize the possibility of resuming a career with the active or Select Reserve components. In most cases, the military is able to fill any gaps in its manpower needs through the traditional reserve components, known as the Selected Reserve, in which part time troops are assigned to units, drill regularly and are often dubbed “weekend warriors.” But during severe personnel shortages, the IRR is tapped, too.

During the peak years of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, about 30,000 soldiers and Marines from the IRR were mobilized for deployments. The most common occupational fields for which they were recalled were the combat arms, military police, vehicle operators, mechanics and engineers.
The Navy and Air Force also.
The current number of people in each
service’s Individual Ready Reserve:
Army: 93,861
Marine Corps: 70,188
Navy: 53,353
Air Force: 36,751
SOURCE: MILITARY SERVICE
Posted in these groups: Us_army_irr_ssi IRR
Edited 4 y ago
Avatar_feed
Responses: 14
MSgt Robert Pellam
7
7
0
This sounds like some bean counter is looking for a promotion. Why would you go after members who are out unless you have a national Crisis? The article eludes to it being done in the civilian world. Military and Civilian worlds are not compatible, or comparable. You would be getting someone who left for reasons in the first place. Dragging them back would shoot moral right in the leg. This sounds like a scheme for someone in Washington to get a promotion or get some recognition. May sound great on paper but in actuality it would just piss a lot of people off with no benefit. But its just my opinion.
(7)
Comment
(0)
SFC Joe S. Davis Jr., MSM, DSL
SFC Joe S. Davis Jr., MSM, DSL
4 y
MSgt Robert Pellam Thanks for the response, this makes absolutely no sense. The Government is always up to something.
(1)
Reply
(0)
MAJ Contracting Officer
MAJ (Join to see)
4 y
Just pull individuals out of the Ready Reserve, Inactive means they don't want to be there anymore.
(1)
Reply
(0)
Avatar_small
LCpl Steven Fiore
5
5
0
Edited 4 y ago
Think it would make recruiting a much harder sell. A four year contract with 4 inactive is a much easier sale than essentially 4 year active and 4 year semi active reserve.

I think the last resort is the correct move. We already have enough problems with vets transitioning after their EAS, I think messing with the IRR, will make it much harder to assimilate back into civilian society.
(5)
Comment
(0)
Avatar_small
COL Jon Thompson
5
5
0
Any forced call up outside of a National emergency declared by the President would be a mistake IMHO. Unlike select reservists. these service members have gone back almost fully to the civilian world and if you uproot them from their jobs, you are not going to get a quality person. In 2003, I was mobilized and ended up in Macdill AFB working for SOCCENT. Also there was a Marine captain who had just a few months left on his military service obligation. He had started a brokerage business in SOCAL and had to turn over all of his clients to someone else. He did the bare minimum to not get in trouble and that what in 2003. The other thing I will say is that the Army will need to look at how they administer IRR Soldiers. In my case, I transferred to the IRR from my last unit so I could deploy. I came back to the IRR when I de-mobed. I retired a couple of years later from the IRR but am still trying to get my retirement award. These Soldiers really do not have a home or a unit and that would have to change. I think it will have to be more than just attaching them to a unit for a mission. The final thing is that many of these service members probably will not be physically fit anymore. I think there is a reason that these service members are "just sitting there." This issue raises a lot of questions that the DoD will have to answer to make it work. Now, if this is solely for volunteers, the Army already has done that with Tour of Duty. All they would need to do is restrict tours to IRR only and they probably would get many of them filled.
(5)
Comment
(0)
Avatar_small

Join nearly 2 million former and current members of the US military, just like you.

close
Seg?add=7750261&t=2