Posted on Jun 24, 2015
SFC Joseph Bosley
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OK here’s a quick question for you infantry guys still serving. Last week I was at a high school graduation and there were several infantrymen there, all sitting together; a COL, CSM, SFC, 2 SSG’s, and a SGT. All of them were wearing a blue cord and disks. When I was still in only actual infantry, with 11 series MOS’s could wear the cord and disks. My question is can a CSM wear them now? I retired in ’09 and at that time a CSM was MOS 00 series thus didn’t qualify for wear the cord and disks. All of the units I served in none of my CSM’s wore them. Now I have to say that these were National Guard soldiers and I’m not up to speed on the National Guard regs. But is this allowed now?
Posted in these groups: Leadership-abstract-007 Leadership4276e14c UniformsArmy-usa-or-09b.svg CSM
Edited 6 y ago
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CSM James Winslow
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Battalion and BDE level CSM's retain their PMOS when they put on the Wreath. It is the nominative positions that get the MOS 00Z awarded now. DA and HRC changed that a couple of years ago. Its in the Enlisted Personnel Management reg.
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CSM Deputy Sheriff
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CSM James Winslow, Can you please clarify for me, because I'm not seeing it specifically called out in AR 135–205. As a newly minted CSM from the CSM-D list, my promotion orders state: therefore promoted from 1SG to SGM. MOS 11Z6X is awarded as his primary MOS. My appointment memo states: Appointed to Command Sergeant Major (TPU) for SGM Eric R. Biggs, 11Z. What I'm understanding from your comment and what I'm reading in AR 135–205, is I should wear my blue cord and disks with crossed rifles even though my unit is not and infantry billet. We are a TASS unit providing MOS reclass ALC (BNCOC) and SLC (ANCOC) to QM MOS's. I am also understanding that once appointed to any position above BDE I would remove the disks and cord.
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CSM James Winslow
CSM James Winslow
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See AR 670-1, Para 19-30 a. 5 (c). for the authorized wear of the cord and disks in your particular case. BLUF: wearing of the cord is dependent on position and TDA. You always wear your disks.
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SGM Senior Adviser, National Communications
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SFC Bosley, COL Williams is correct, however, an exception is implied in later portions of the regulation allowing wear of older uniform versions that were correct at the time of retirement. For example, my late father in law, CSM Stanley R Marlette had 32+ years in the infantry, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, etc...and as the 3rd ID CSM who retired in 1972, could wear that uniform today if he were still alive. We buried him in it instead.
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COL Charles Williams
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Generally SFC Joseph Bosley You have to be Infantry as your PMOS/Branch and serving on an Infantry unit. As an example... when I went to OCS, guys that used to be Infantry, thought they got the cord for life... and had to be corrected... This is what the the current 670-1 says:

21–31. Distinctive items authorized for infantry personnel
a. Cord, shoulder.
(1) Description. See DA Pam 670-1.
(2) How worn. See DA Pam 670-1.
(3) Approval authority. The Commanding General, U.S. Army Infantry Center authorizes the award of the shoulder cord to infantrymen who have successfully completed the appropriate training. For ARNG Soldiers, commanders of divisions, separate brigades, infantry regiments, the infantry scout group, and state adjutants general for separate infantry battalions and companies are authorized to award the shoulder cord to ARNG Soldiers who have successfully completed the appropriate training.
(4) Authorized wearers.
(a) Officers and enlisted personnel of the infantry, who hold an infantry PMOS or specialty, and who have been awarded the combat Infantryman badge, the expert infantryman badge, or who have successfully completed the basic unit phase of an Army training program or an equivalent.
(b) Enlisted personnel who have completed one station unit training (OSUT), resulting in the award of an infantry PMOS.
(c) Infantry officers who have graduated from the resident infantry officer basic or advanced course.
(d) Infantry officers who have graduated from the Infantry Officer Candidate Course (during mobilization).
(e) Infantry officers and enlisted personnel in the Reserve Components, who hold an infantry PMOS or specialty.
(5) When worn.
(a) During the period of assignment to an infantry regiment, brigade, separate infantry battalion, infantry company (including the headquarters and headquarters company of an infantry division), infantry platoon, or infantry TDA unit. In addition, infantrymen assigned to infantry sections or squads within units other than infantry units may wear the cord when authorized by battalion or higher-level commanders.
(b) During the period assigned for duty as an Army recruiter or advisor, ROTC instructor, or member of the staff and faculty of the U.S. Military Academy, as long as the individual retains an infantry PMOS or specialty.
(c) During the period of assignment at brigade- or lower-level BT or advance individual training units, or in OSUT infantry units, as long as individual retains an infantry PMOS or specialty.
(d) Infantry OSUT and Infantry Officer Basic Course graduates may wear the cord en route to their initial follow-on infantry assignment.
(e) Soldiers en route from an assignment where wear of the shoulder cord was authorized are permitted to wear the shoulder cord if they are pending reassignment to another organization authorized wear of the cord, or when assigned to a separation point for discharge purposes.
c. Insignia disk, service cap.
(1) Description. See DA Pam 670-1.
(2) How worn. See DA Pam 670–1.
(3) Approval authority. Approval authority is as provided in paragraph 21–31a(3). The insignia is issued at no cost to enlisted personnel.
(4) Authorized wearers. Enlisted infantry personnel who otherwise meet the qualifications provided in paragraph 21–31b(4).
(5) When worn. Authority to wear is as provided in paragraph 21–31a(5)
http://www.apd.army.mil/pdffiles/r670_1.pdf
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