Posted on Aug 11, 2020
Travis Leutbecher
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Do I need to have a prescription to get heartburn medication at BCT? I don’t have an official diagnosis for acid reflux but not having the otc Nexium is a bitch and half.
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SFC Patient Service Tech
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Reference DoDI 6130.03, March 30, 2018, Section 5.12.

This section dictates PDQ reasons for Gastric Reflux disease. I am guessing since you were never diagnosed that this particular section may not apply. If you were, you would have either required a waiver or would have been straight up denied acceptance into the Army upon your disclosure during Medical. Had this been disclosed/diagnosed.

When you get to BCT, if you have OTC meds for heartburn, you will be told to throw it away since it was not prescribed to you by a medical doctor. Then...and only then...in order to get more meds you will be required to go to sick call and see a provider to get said 'script.

Doing this may raise red flags. Which could lead to your getting discharged at basic for an undisclosed medical issue that could have/should have PDQ you from service for a medical issue that was/is preexisting before service.

I am not saying this to scare you. I am saying this to enlighten you. I will not sugar coat this.
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Travis Leutbecher
Travis Leutbecher
12 mo
Then i will definitely need a waiver. Will this disqualify me for certain jobs? Seems like a simple “low on the totem pole” waiver as opposed to if i had major surgery or something like that.
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SFC Patient Service Tech
SFC (Join to see)
12 mo
Travis Leutbecher - Again, Google the DoDI I gave. You could very well find yourself PDQ (permanently disqualified) from entry into the service.
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SPC John Tacetta
SPC John Tacetta
12 mo
Travis Leutbecher - Here's the excerpt directly.
5.12. ABDOMINAL ORGANS AND GASTROINTESTINAL SYSTEM.
a. Esophageal Disease.
(1) History of Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease, with complications, including, but not
limited to:
(a) Stricture.
(b) Dysphagia.
(c) Recurrent symptoms or esophagitis despite maintenance medication.
(d) Barrett’s esophagus.
(e) Extraesophageal complications such as: reactive airway disease; recurrent
sinusitis or dental complications; unresponsive to acid suppression.
(2) History of surgical correction (e.g., fundoplication) for Gastro-Esophageal Reflux
Disease within 6 months or with complications.
DoDI 6130.03, March 30, 2018
SECTION 5: DISQUALIFYING CONDITIONS 21
(3) History of dysmotility disorders to include but not limited to diffuse esophageal
spasm, nutcracker esophagus, and achalasia.
(4) History of eosinophilic esophagitis.
(5) History of other esophageal strictures (e.g., from ingesting lye).
(6) History of esophageal disease not specified above; including but not limited to
neoplasia, ulceration, varices, or fistula.
b. Stomach and Duodenum.
(1) Current dyspepsia, gastritis, or duodenitis despite medication (over the counter or
prescription).
(2) Current gastric or duodenal ulcers, including but not limited to peptic ulcers and
gastrojejunal ulcers:
(a) History of a treated ulcer within the last 3 months.
(b) Recurrent or complicated by bleeding, obstruction, or perforation within the
previous 5 years.
(3) History of surgery for peptic ulceration or perforated ulcer.
(4) History of gastroparesis of greater than 6 week’s duration, confirmed by scintigraphy
or equivalent test.
(5) History of bariatric surgery of any type (e.g., lap-band or gastric bypass surgery for
weight loss).
(6) History of gastric varices.
c. Small and Large Intestine.
(1) History of inflammatory bowel disease, including but not limited to Crohn’s disease,
ulcerative colitis, ulcerative proctitis, or indeterminate colitis.
(2) Current infectious colitis.
(3) History of intestinal malabsorption syndromes, including but not limited to celiac
sprue, pancreatic insufficiency, post-surgical and idiopathic.
(4) Dietary intolerances that may interfere with military duty or consuming military
rations. Lactase deficiency does not meet the standard only if of sufficient severity to require
frequent intervention, or to interfere with military duties.
(5) History of gastrointestinal functional or motility disorders including but not limited
to volvulus within the past 24 months, or any history of pseudo-obstruction or megacolon.
DoDI 6130.03, March 30, 2018
SECTION 5: DISQUALIFYING CONDITIONS 22
(6) Current chronic constipation, requiring prescription medication or medical
interventions (e.g., pelvic floor physical therapy, biofeedback therapy).
(7) History of diarrhea of greater than 6 weeks duration, regardless of cause, persisting
or symptomatic in the past 2 years.
(8) History of gastrointestinal bleeding, including positive occult blood, if the cause
requires treatment and has not been corrected.
(9) History of irritable bowel syndrome of sufficient severity to require frequent
intervention or prescription medication or that may reasonably be expected to interfere with
military duty.
(10) History of symptomatic diverticular disease of the intestine.
(11) Personal or family history of familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome or
hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (Lynch syndrome).
d. Hepatic-Biliary Tract.
(1) History of chronic Hepatitis B unless successfully treated and the cure is
documented. A documented cure for Hepatitis B is viral clearance manifested by Hepatitis B
surface antigen negative/Hepatitis B surface antibody positive/Hepatitis B core antibody
positive.
(2) History of chronic Hepatitis C, unless successfully treated and with documentation of
a cure 12 weeks after completion of a full course of therapy.
(3) Other acute hepatitis in the preceding 6 months, or persistence of symptoms or
abnormal serum aminotransferases after 6 months, or objective evidence of impairment of liver
function.
(4) History of cirrhosis, hepatic abscess, or complications of chronic liver disease.
(5) History of symptomatic gallstones or gallbladder disease unless successfully treated.
(6) History of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction.
(7) History of choledochal cyst.
(8) History of primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis.
(9) History of metabolic liver disease, excluding Gilbert’s syndrome. This includes but
is not limited to hemochromatosis, Wilson’s disease, or alpha-1 anti-trypsin deficiency.
(10) History of alcoholic or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease if there is evidence of
chronic liver disease, manifested as impairment of liver function or hepatic fibrosis.
(11) History of traumatic injury to the liver within the preceding 6 months.
DoDI 6130.03, March 30, 2018
SECTION 5: DISQUALIFYING CONDITIONS 23
e. Pancreas. History of:
(1) Pancreatic insufficiency.
(2) Acute pancreatitis, unless due to cholelithiasis successfully treated by
cholecystectomy.
(3) Chronic pancreatitis.
(4) Pancreatic cyst or pseudocyst.
(5) Pancreatic surgery.
f. Anorectal.
(1) Current anal fissure or anal fistula.
(2) History of rectal prolapse or stricture within the last 2 years.
(3) History of fecal incontinence after the 13th birthday.
(4) Current hemorrhoid (internal or external), if symptomatic or requiring medical
intervention within the last 60 days.
g. Abdominal Wall.
(1) Current abdominal wall hernia other than small (less than 2 centimeters (cm) in size),
asymptomatic inguinal or umbilical hernias.
(2) History of open or laparoscopic abdominal surgery during the preceding 3 months.
(3) The presence of any ostomy (gastrointestinal or urinary).

Don't obsess about it. Agita is no more a disease than headache, unless it's caused by an underlying condition. You should consult your physician if you're worried or have an actual condition.
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Sgt Field Radio Operator
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Edited 12 mo ago
Make sure you report this at MEPS or have you been and not reported this condition?
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CPT Staff Officer
CPT (Join to see)
12 mo
I can hear the Drill SGT's comments while in the chow line now............
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SSgt Christophe Murphy
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Once you are on Active Duty and have a medical issue go to the doctor. If you need medicine they can prescribe it. Don’t overthink it
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Travis Leutbecher
Travis Leutbecher
12 mo
At what point am I considered active duty? As soon as a leave for basic?
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SSgt Christophe Murphy
SSgt Christophe Murphy
12 mo
Travis Leutbecher once you arrive at basic you will have the opportunity to address medical issues. It may not be immediate but within the first week you will get to report any ongoing issues and routine medical checks are pretty common.

Again, don’t overthink it. They have newjoins arriving every week. This is 101 stuff
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Travis Leutbecher
Travis Leutbecher
12 mo
SSgt Christophe Murphy thank you! I appreciate it!
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SPC John Tacetta
SPC John Tacetta
12 mo
Travis Leutbecher - When you are inducted, that is report for duty and are sworn in.
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