Posted on Oct 1, 2015
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**WARNING: GRAPHIC FOOTAGE**

Published by "Deadbolt 1975" & story by Funker530

The wounded Marine hit in the neck was the corpsman, and just off screen another Marine had been shot in the head. Thanks to the quick work of their team, they explained that they had both made full recoveries from their injuries.

At 2:14 in the video you can see a perfect example of what needs to be done to actually stop the bleeding of a gunshot wound. The gauze is packed deep into the wound channel left by the 7.62 round, which does far more to control bleeding than just applying pressure externally.

At 2:24 another Marine calls out that “Bumpy is hit in the head”. Without giving it a second thought, the wounded corpsman tells the guys working on him to leave him, and “go help bumpy”.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPNp-I9CJ6k&feature=youtu.be
Posted in these groups: 01 VideoEga Marine CorpsAir_combat_art_0134 Combat
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Responses: 3
1stSgt Operations Manager
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Awesome job, Doc. Noticed that the Medivac was Army/Air Force. Great job to them also. We had Army medivac flying for us in Iraq, from Lonestar Dustoff. They were phenomenal and my boys and I can never thank them enough for what they did for us. I learned alot by dealing with them. Toss the smoke, they land on the smoke. USMC, toss the smoke they land where they want, but you can bet it will be over there somewhere. One thing that threw me off with Lonestar was they always asked me what color the smoke was instead of calling the smoke they saw. We got over it though. The pilots and medics were amazing. Semper Fidelis
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Capt Jeff S.
Capt Jeff S.
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The only thing I can imagine as to why they asked you to call the smoke color was confirmation to make sure that the enemy wasn't popping colored smoke (perhaps of a different color) to lure them into an ambush.
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1stSgt Operations Manager
1stSgt (Join to see)
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Capt Jeff S. Skipper, we train to have the pilot call the smoke and then we confirm it. If we call the smoke, then the enemy can throw the same color and conduct the ambush.
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Capt Jeff S.
Capt Jeff S.
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Was kind of under the impression that our communications would be encrypted, and that the enemy would NOT be able to decrypt and respond rapidly enough to our conversation to figure out what color smoke to pop -- unless we're breaking COMSEC and transmitting in the clear, which is a "NO-NO!"

Even with encryption, you don't always need to know what is being said if you can figure out who is talking to who, and you have a fair understanding of the nature of the conversation. For example, inbound medevac helicopter is going to land to pick up casualties near firefight. Helo is transmitting and communicating with forces on the ground. SOP = pop colored smoke when helo approaches LZ so helo knows where to land...

The enemy will know that we are transmitting, but if our communications haven't been compromised, they wouldn't know what we are saying. They see a blackhawk helicopter inbound and can figure out that it is likely coming in to a hot LZ to resupply, deliver additional troops, and/or remove casualties. Either way, they don't want that helicopter to accomplish any of those missions.

I am assuming that the enemy has probably figured out our procedures for throwing out smoke and I'm assuming they would have to guess the color and try to pop it when they see the helicopter inbound and closing in on the LZ.

If they can beat us to the pop and throw their smoke out first, AND IF we aren't observing the proper comm procedures that you identified, they might succeed in confusing the crew... (even if the smoke is the wrong color!) IFF they can jam our communications, cause confusion, and get the helo to land in the wrong LZ (where they can ambush it!) That's all. Maybe I'm reading too much into this and over-thinking it. I totally get what you are saying though 1stSgt (Join to see), and I believe we are on the same page.
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SFC Joe S. Davis Jr., MSM, DSL
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Thanks for the feed!
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SPC David Stephenson
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Even hit he's still triaging the situation - good to hear both made it.
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