Posted on Jul 18, 2018
PFC Food Service Specialist
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I’m currently in the MO National Guard, I joined in July of 2017 and I went to training in October, I got back from BT and AIT in April and I’ve been with my unit (1-138th FSC) ever since. I don’t wish to be in the National Guard anymore though. There isn’t anything wrong with it , it’s just not what I want, I’d prefer to do this everyday and not one weekend a month, etc. I’m currently coming up on my sixth month with my unit and I know that’s how long I have to be with them before I can be considered to be released by them, but I don’t know if they’ll release me because I’ve been with them for such a short time. I’d like some insight on what to do about going Active at this point.
Posted in these groups: Missouri ARNGDuty-honor-country-tadhc-4t Duty
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2d Lt Materials Manager
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You need to go speak with an Active Duty (or any branch you’re looking at) recruitor. They will walk you through the entire process, if you’re eligible. Later on, you will also need to provide a compelling reason for your Company/Battalion/Brigade to release you so early in your contract. If your unit is slated for a deployment, you will have to provide a compelling reason to be released, as well. That will be sent up higher for them to evaluate and release you.
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PFC Food Service Specialist
PFC (Join to see)
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Alright, thanks for the information SGT.
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CPT Lawrence Cable
CPT Lawrence Cable
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PFC (Join to see) - SGT Duffy is correct in that you need to see an Active Army Recruiter. He will fill out a DD368 Request for Conditional Release, which will release you from you present contract to enlist in the regular Army. The release does not require the blessing of anyone below the First General in your Chain of Command. He or She or their designated representative must sign off on the Release. The bad news side of this is that most State National Guard organization frown on releasing troops that haven't served a least a substantial portion of their original contract. The states I was around usually required the soldier to at least complete two years of their contract unless there was some very compelling reason. Either way, this isn't a very fast process.
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