Posted on Oct 22, 2014
CW3 Guy Snodgrass
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Veterans-homelessness
I've really been bothered by our homeless brothers and sisters. I have been looking into starting a homeless veteran shelter/job assist. My question: Has anyone started one? If so could you help point the way? It pains me to see our fellow brothers and sisters living in the street, or worse. In my opinion if we don't take care of our own; no one else will. Would any of you be willing to help provide assistance (advice, finance, etc)?
Thank you

Essayons!
Posted in these groups: Vietnam_20veteran Homeless
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Responses: 36
LCpl Andrew Yawger
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i live in new jersey and the VA here saved my life i had know where to go my parents didnt have no room at their house for me i was living on the streets i went to a dr visit at the va in lyons new jersey and they took me in and i got back on my feet in like 18 months they take care of you very well here they have plenty of free housing or very cheap housing for single vets. they helped me find a job and repair my credit and took care of all my legal issues i had and kept me out of jail and made me a better person.
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Cpl Anthony Pearson
Cpl Anthony Pearson
6 y
Thank you for sharing this personal story of yours. I am proud of you, Marine, for seeking and getting help, and sharing your story. It gives people hope.
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Cpl Anthony Pearson
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I volunteer and help out with the VALOR CLINIC (You can find them on Facebook). They are all about finding homeless veterans, transporting them to and from events that are set up to help them with food, clothing, medical check-ups, VA benefit enrollment, furniture, and more.

We actually go INTO the woods, into 'tent cities', and under bridges, to find the homeless veterans.

Valor Clinic is amazing and they get my FULL support and love.
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LCpl Andrew Yawger
LCpl Andrew Yawger
6 y
good job man i was a homeless vet once and the va saved me. keep up the good work man very proud of you man.
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Cpl Anthony Pearson
Cpl Anthony Pearson
6 y
God bless you, brother. Glad to hear that you broke away from that situation.

Stay strong, Marine.
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PO2 Butch Smith
PO2 Butch Smith
>1 y
Thanks for the info, Cpl Pearson. I have been trying to find a good group to help.
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SGM Senior Adviser, National Communications
11
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Edited 6 y ago
With respect, I know they are out there, but here , I've never met one who seemed like a real vet, or who would accept help from the VA if they were. NONE I stop to chat with during the past 9 years--hundreds...could tell me who their first sergeant was, the maximum range of the weapon they claim, their MOS....simple things. They can't all be PTSD with no memory. Recently a fellow showed up at a VA Clinic in full new BDUs hiting up other vets in the clinic for cash "to get home"--police knew him well--he was never a veteran. TODAY there were two panhandlers in Raleigh-Durham--one with dirty clothing but a nice haircut and trimmed beard, the other with red bloodshot eyes reeking of alcohol. NEITHER could name the motto of their unit; or tell me the difference between a serial number and a SSN (they both claim to be Vietnam Vets) and they both sheepishly walked away when I said we were sending some Rolling Thunder fellows to help them--if they really needed help; --so I am 1000+% supporting any true homeless vet--a nation as wealthy as ours should not have a single one; the VA could operate housing on former military bases, etc. On the other hand some choose to be "homeless". They earned the right to make that choice even if we do not believe they can make it intelligently. I just don't think they should be begging if they make that choice. And for the MAJORITY here who seem to be fakers--toss them off the nearest bridge.
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SSG Jerrold English
SSG Jerrold English
>1 y
Mos, serial number, last duty station...those are easy but I honestly can't remember a lot of that. I know where and when I went to basic but I can't tell you the numbers, same with AIT, I only remember where. I can only remember the barracks name of one of my duty stations lol and... I run a small business, a summer day care for kids and take care of 13 horses along with all the other mouths I feed around here! With Parkinsons lol Maybe your questions are to hard for us old timers LOL I'm also not a drinker or fan of drugs, not even what the VA wants me to take lol
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CW3 Chuck Huddleston
CW3 Chuck Huddleston
>1 y
Most of the ones I have seen are just plain panhandlers who don't want work, just free money for doing nothing. I don't like to see them using a veteran status to get money, regardless if they truly are a vet or not. Veterans should be proud of their service, not drag it into the street.
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1stSgt Eugene Harless
1stSgt Eugene Harless
5 y
I'm picking up what you are laying down 100%. While it might make you feel good about yourself handing that "homeless vet" a few bucks or getting him/her a sandwich it's a short term fix for someone that could be a con. Southern California is like the Mecca of Hobos. The weather is good year round. the people are generous and there are Many areas where transients can go without being rousted by Law Enforcement.
Hobos fall into two main categories. The first and smaller category are those who are extremely mentally ill. They don't have the ability to reason and therefore can't function enough to hold a job or maintain a place of residence. They are usually the filthiest ones and don't do a lot of interacting with the public. They need to be institutionalized and given the proper medication.
The second type is those who are addicts or alcoholics. Their entire existence centers around a little food, water, basic shelter and the next high. Nothing short of a full intervention, counseling and constant supervision will get them back as a functioning member of society.
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AA Joseph Moody
AA Joseph Moody
>1 y
1stSgt Eugene Harless - I live in central Pa, and my brother and I go out fairly often to sight see the panhandlers and one thing I have learned with doing that (although around here it is hard to not see them on a regular basis) is that they make some good money. I watched one for about 2 hours once while waiting for someone and in that time I saw the lady make about 2-300 dollars. A new face, the look of real need and a preggers looking belly in the middle of december tends to pull the heartstrings.
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