Posted on May 16, 2019
CPT Infantry Officer
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I have had two breaks in service so far. I have been on law enforcement, security, and management across a few different agencies and companies. One thing that I learned is that no one really considers your prior military service as a credential for most civilian occupations. It's the same issue why service members have difficulty writing resumes. Honestly no one cares that you are at Pathfinder qualified when they are trying to buy a house. Now in the past I liked to hire veterans because they have a very solid work ethic. It doesn't matter what their job was. Just because someone has a badge doesn't mean they will be a good employee.

What have you seen when you transitioned or as a civilian?
Posted in these groups: Military-civilian-600x338 TransitionMilitary-leadership-skills-civilian-employment Civilians
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Responses: 10
PFC Jeffrey Herrington
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I think my approach was a little wonky myself. I had a 5 year plan when I enlisted for 4 years. Picked an MOS where I thought I would be getting marketable job skills, and enlisted for the Army College Fund so I could get an education cert to backup my job experience. If I re-enlisted it would be great, if I didn't re-enlist that would have been great too kinda deal. My choice of MOS wasn't the best timing for it. Looking back I should've known something was up when the airborne recruiter came around when I was in AIT looking to pick up everyone that raised their hand, regardless of PT test scores and my promotion point required to make E-5 hovered at the lowest promotion points could be for as long as I checked. At my last duty station my E-5 in my MOS was looking at hitting his RCP until the war in Iraq broke out. That really pounded the point home that I needed to get out.

Funny thing happened, after seperation I started working and earning crazy money damn near immediately. I was one of only 10 people that got to the interview and was able the pass the soldiering skills test. I still don't know how I did it. It was strange as I was the youngest in the group by 20 years. It turns out they were looking for veterans and specifically Army soldiers for our ability to "deploy" for work as field techs in not to ideal conditions. Then our skills in handling a work van filled with specialized equipment. You know things you do as a tech in a shop apart of an Forward Support Battalion.

Work after that was similar. I was hired using my military credentials not so much for the skills and knowledge people doing the a job know but how to "deploy", "jump", and maintain personal readiness. When I got a few jobs that merely focused on the skills of my trade, I found I did poorly. Not being able to adapt to corporate culture, proper workplace etiquette and usual "water cooler" things. The job I have now was like winning the lottery. My day to day life at work is like my life as it was in the going to the field apart of 4th ID, except its only for 8 to 12 hour days. The more I apply basic soldiering skills is the easier my work life tends to be.

All those work details I had to do because things got slow for my MOS? That came in handy when I got a job with KBR in afghanistan. Despite some weirdness with a job title that it took a bit to find out about, I was an instant fit for the first shop I was assigned too. After I found where I was supposed to be, a few of the people from the first shop found me to tell me how much I was missed and asked if I wanted to come back. I made six figures just for knowing how to look to do things around a shop that don't have a job title for.
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MAJ Ken Landgren
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The only time I think about my military career is in this forum.
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COL Gary Gresh
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While it may be true that military service is difficult to paraphrase in a resume it still is a plus when talking in the interview. Vets are more self assured, more mature and know how to better express themselves. That’s not ego but rather well developed leadership skills that only the military can provide. I managed to land a very good position in a company after my retirement, worked my way up the ladder in the civilian company and eventually became their Vice President for HR AND SAFETY. I then became the chief hire person for the company. I always loved interviewing vets of all ranks. They almost always had their act together, knew how to report for the interview on time and dressed appropriately. They got hired.
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