Posted on Jun 7, 2019
A1C Prisoner
48.1K
836
327
172
172
0
Bcc15e6
11572f7
B106c07
As an Airman (E2) a new guy had come into the squadron and was assigned to be my dormmate. I knew how hard it was coming to a new place overseas so I wanted him to feel welcome. I gave him an old Tv I had, my internet password and made sure I brought him out that weekend to meet people. He went out and bought food and left the kitchen a mess after cooking. I figured he was still getting adjusted to living on his own so I cleaned it up and let him know not to leave it a mess.

This began to happen more and more frequently until it started happening on a daily basis. I would clean and soon after it would be a mess. I took this up the chain of command and nothing was done. 2 days before a room inspection happened I took a picture to show my situation. Nothing was done and my roommate cooked again, giving us 6 demerits in the kitchen alone. A few months later is when I took a picture of what looked like moldy butter and sent it the dorm managers requesting a room change. Though they approved it, it was denied by my first sergeant who said he would “handle it”. In the meantime I stopped using my own kitchen.

Months past and nothing changed until one night i came in and the kitchen smelled like death. I discovered that he had been putting trash bags over meat that was rotting in the bottom of the trash. I looked in the fridge and found that it was filled with meats, milks, and other things that were months past expired. I spent hours throwing out everything in the kitchen from food to pots and pans until there was nothing left, saving only whatever that blob is in the picture which I wrapped in a plastic. I then bleached it from top to bottom.

The next day, I go into work and hand my supervisor the bag saying “hey Ssgt, I brought you a present”. He opens the bag and immediately looks as if he’s about to throw up and asks me “what the fxck? What is that?” I tell him that is what I’m being forced to live with. Later that day I’m called into my first shirts office who tells me that throwing everything out was wrong because my roommate spent money on it and that bringing it into work was overreacting. He then told me that he would allow me to switch rooms (almost a year after I first complained).

Besides getting paperwork for this, and not being able to live comfortably in my own room I lost every bit of trust and respect i had for my leadership. Obviously this situation was frustrating because almost 3 years later I’m still pretty angry.

How would you have handled this situation if you were a junior enlisted member? How would you hav handled it as an NCO or Officer?
Avatar_feed
Responses: 208
SFC Patient Service Tech
117
117
0
Honestly, as a Junior Enlisted...I would have beat his ass and made him clean the kitchen every day. But that was back in my younger dumber angrier days. As an NCO, I would have taken those pictures and sent them to his Leadership (especially if he was in a different unit). And if nothing happened, I would have continued to push this higher to every single level until something was done.
(117)
Comment
(0)
SSG William Hull
SSG William Hull
4 mo
Your first mistake was letting him get away with it the first time.
(20)
Reply
(0)
Sgt Edward Kaufman
Sgt Edward Kaufman
4 mo
Absolutely. "Next time...There will be NO NEXT TIME"
(5)
Reply
(0)
PO3 Glenn Roland
(15)
Reply
(0)
SFC Patient Service Tech
SFC (Join to see)
4 mo
PO3 Glenn Roland - And always trying to skate uphill
(4)
Reply
(0)
Avatar_small
LTC Jason Mackay
91
91
0
Edited 1 y ago
A1C (Join to see) so this went on for how long? And you ended up getting yelled at?

The Air Force really needs a Company level of Command. Your First Sergeant was at Squadron level? This is basic Squad Leader/Team Leader stuff.

As a junior enlisted I would have went to each level until something got fixed. As soon as I got written documentation telling me I was in the wrong, I would have hit the Squadron Commander on the open door policy with my photos, an MFR on what happened and interim remedies attempted, inaction of the NCO support channel and the barracks policy. If that blew back, I would have taken all my documentation to IG.

As a Junior Leader, like as a Platoon Leader. That shit would have been fixed or I'd be recommending an Article 15. There are people out there that come from homes like this. No one showed them how to live and care for themselves. Did he have issues with personal hygiene and uniform appearance? They usually go hand in hand. A friend of mine had a kid whose parents were crack heads. His squad leader had to show him how to shower and care for himself.

I would have:
- gone to your barracks area with you to see for myself. I would have called my PSG from the room and had him meet me there.
- called the SM in, barracks SOP in hand, and have my PSG go dish by dish and page by page. His first line would be there before PT to inspect. DA 4856 event based Counseling with pictures. Another if it was not to standard by 0600.
- my PSG, without prompting, would tell me he got this, and begin colon level inspections of his space and shared areas to ensure the counseling "took". I would likely never hear about it again. I might hear about a "why is everyone picking on me" story from the Chaplain or an open door policy. I'd show them the pictures and the 4856s and it would end right there.
- feedback on progress would be delivered by phot essays and DA form 4856. Good and bad.
- I honestly think it would stop here.......even single cell organisms respond to pain.
- if I found out it happened again, corrective training. If my NCOs were at a loss (highly doubtful, this is their element), I would secure his room and make him establish bivouac in a shelter half (even if I had to go to an Army Navy store to get one) in front of the barracks daily for a week, allowing him to return for personal hygiene following PT. Field site would be inspected before lights out by the CQ and before PT by his first line or other section NCO. Once he mastered living hygienically in a field environment, we could resume living in the hardstand barracks. It can be done.....I've seen first Sergeants do this.
- if it happened again, my PSG would likely go the Article 15 route. By this time he has been given the standard, instructed on the standard, held to the standard, and failed to maintain basic standards.
- Again, fitness for duty examination by Mental Health
- again (I honestly don't think it would go this far), Chapter.

The only complication would have been if you were in A Company, and he was in B Company. Once the initial introductions were made, it would be double the quantity of NCOs spreading joy and love.

If any of the NCOs sloughed this off, and a CSM or BN Barracks Manager saw it, you and Airman Pigpen would not be who they'd call. The TL, SL, PSG and 1SG would be at parade rest in the CSMs office explaining why they failed so badly at maintaining standards and discipline. Then it would have been open season on you two. That is where I think the service culture played a role here.
(91)
Comment
(0)
SPC Joe Greco
SPC Joe Greco
4 mo
He should’ve came out of basic training knowing that shit so someone in basic training did not do their job
(2)
Reply
(0)
SGT Alexander Brigham
SGT Alexander Brigham
4 mo
Exactly as a first line NCO in my last years I dealt with issues just like how you describe. LTC Jason Mackay Go with the OP and then discuss corrective training with their first line NCO it probably never would have gone past 1 or 2 E5s unless their NCO would refuse to do anything or get involved then I would need to move it higher but this should never get to be a Commissioned Officer issue. Wall to Wall counseling and smoke sessions would be in order. I have been in trouble for helping people outside my command before which I thought was bs but when a fellow NCO or anyone really asks for advice I'm not going to blow them off I'm not that kind of person. But that seems to be the only issue I can see making it go past 1 or 2 E5s.
(4)
Reply
(0)
SSgt Bryan Tobey
SSgt Bryan Tobey
2 mo
SPC Joe Greco - Not necessarily. As a Training Instructor in the Air Force basic or (DI for the ground pounders)
I can attest to the fact that a TI or DI, probably did have him squared away for the two months or so that he was in basic. Hell, almost anyone can straighten out for that long. I bet that I could have straightened out ole Charles Manson for the two months if I had had him. But that doesn’t mean he wouldn’t revert right back to being the dirt bag Killer that he was the minute he was cut loose. Saw it happen time and again. And it was never the instructors fault. Or rarely never his fault.
Having two whole months with him (or her) isn’t going to change the fact of how slovenly mummy raised him. It’s 3qtrs nurture to 1qtrs nature. And this dude was 3qtrs short of a full deck.
And if any one thing would straighten there ass out it would be CC correctional custody. Cause after that it’s the boot out the door and don’t let it hit you where the good Lord split ya.
(1)
Reply
(0)
CPL Joseph Elinger
CPL Joseph Elinger
8 d
In The Army we have something called *"Health & Welfare Inspections."
If YOU feel (as I do) that a "health" criteria wasn't met / enforced, or a Health Code violated, the added recourse would be to contact your Medical Platoon Sargent & ask for a qualified Medic NCO to be added for such inspection (& future ones)!
PS: I was a Medic & OR Specialist.
(0)
Reply
(0)
Avatar_small
MAJ Operations Research/Systems Analysis (Orsa)
43
43
0
As an officer, assuming we are in the Army and assuming I'm a platoon leader, if this incident somehow got to me I would reach out to his PL first (the LT mafia) and then my PSG and I would brief the company commander with the 1SG (not for their assistance, but to bring them into the loop and let them know we are moving this forward to try and get results at our level first). 9 times out of 10, the TL/SL/PSG have killed this issue before I even have to deal with it. The kicker is, if I were a company commander and this issue came to me, then it's a similar thing. Me and the 1SG would contact that company command team and meet with them at their AO and plot out a solution. At every stage of this at this point if I was either a PL or a CO Commander, I would also brief the Soldier on any developments exactly when they came so that he/she knew the issue is moving forward and where it stands. I can tell you as an NCO way back when, the 3 or 4 times an issue like this came up, it was solved very quickly and usually at the squad leader level with the platoon sergeant only aware of what I was doing, not playing an active participant. It usually never came to that. Maybe because when I was a squad leader where I was at all of my fellow squad leaders in my unit and others took this stuff seriously? I don't know. I'm sure others have different experiences.
(43)
Comment
(0)
MSgt Hal Weeden, MBA
MSgt Hal Weeden, MBA
2 mo
1SG Walter Craig, that was an excellent plan. It was good that you got prior support from the 1SG and CO, and that they didn't back down.
(2)
Reply
(0)
1SG Walter Craig
1SG Walter Craig
2 mo
It worked well but I kept the room for evidence.
(1)
Reply
(0)
SGT Lou D
SGT Lou D
2 mo
When I was an NCO, if an officer were even aware of this level of bullshit, I would view it as a colossal failure of the NCOs under him. This is classic NCO business, and NCOs need to fix it, via counseling, additional training, wall to wall counseling behind the motor pool, or if all that fails, (read that as “the NCO corps have failed) recommending administrative action.
(2)
Reply
(0)
SGM Edward Sullivan
SGM Edward Sullivan
2 mo
I must have missed something that the new PC Military is doing. This would NEVER have occurred in one of my Units. I was ISG of Four different MP Companies, if one of my soldiers came to me with this problem, First, dipstick would be out behind the Company Barracks in his Pup tent with ALL his Combat Issue for a minimum of a week. Second, his PSG, SL, and TL would be on 24 hour, 1 hour Welfare Check of said dipstick. If this did NOT correct the situation, the next level would be his entire Squad, with TLs and his Squad Leader Would be in pup tents behind the Company for another week. I NEVER once had to go to step TWO.
(2)
Reply
(0)
Avatar_small

Join nearly 2 million former and current members of the US military, just like you.

close