Posted on May 27, 2021
SPC Troy Shelby
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Have A acquaintance who served in Desert Storm as a Combat Medic and completed 10 years of service unfortunately he received a dishonorable for striking an officer one night while he was drunk, Ive always given him the respect I show fellow vets because he did serve for so long but I have also been "ripped by other vets for doing so because of his condition of discharge am I wrong to give him the respect I feel he earned in spite of his lack of self restraint that resulted in a one time mistake that cost him his career? I should note that according to the story this aquaintance was returning to base after a night in town at a club and in spite of being in civies the officer who was not part of his chain of command was demanding to be saluted. allegedly the officer was in civies as well at the time of the incident thus this man had no way to know the person was an officer.
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Cpl Vic Burk
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This story seems awful fishy to me. There has to be a lot more to it than they guy is letting on. Ten years of service honorable and getting a bad discharge for this one offense? And the story that he was ordered to salute an officer while in civies and the officer was also in civies? Nope, I don't buy it. This guy is wanting to make everyone think he was the victim to cover for his misconduct. The Marines as a very strict discipline code, stricter than the other branches and even this offense would not have resulted in a bad discharge unless the guy had already been in a $hithouse load of other trouble before and they decided it was time to dispose of him.

As far as whether you want to give him respect as a veteran, that's your decision. Nothing wrong with still being his friend, that too, it your decision.
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Sgt Neil Foster
Sgt Neil Foster
26 d
I had a neighbor who was in the USMC. He always insisted that once you complete recruit training, you are a Marine for life. He also claimed to have served in Lebanon... That of course was pure BULLSHIT. I learned that he did complete USMC recruit training, but went AWOL, and was court-martialed receiving a Bad Conduct Discharge shortly after recruit training... thus his insistence that completing recruit training makes one a Marine for Life... he was a wannabe.

He was also a douchebag... so much so that he completely IGNORED his grand-daughter being molested RIGHT IN FRONT OF HIM while he was playing a video game!

The idiot also couldn't hold down a job. During the 12 years l lived next to this guy he had probably TWICE the number of jobs that I had in my ENTIRE LIFE (I moved in to the neighborhood at 36 and moved out at 48)... he spent a fortune on a Terabyte Server that he set up in his garage so he could sell "Protected Offsite Storage" to companies... I have a degree in IT (as well as Aviation Engineering Technology and Electronic Engineering Technology). I told him that if I was an IT manager for a company and contracted an outside vendor for "Protected Offsite Storage", then found out that the vendor had the server IN HIS GARAGE, I'd sue the hell out of him.

These are all huge RED FLAGS that indicated he was a douchebag, it didn't surprise me at all that his military exploits were bullshit and he received a BCD!
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Cpl Vic Burk
Cpl Vic Burk
26 d
Sgt Neil Foster - If a recruit graduates boot camp they are a Marine whether we like it or not. A Marine that goes AWOL and gets a BCD I certainly would not address as a Brother nor would I say "Semper Fi" to. To get the BCD required more than one AWOL though. You really do have to work to earn that discharge strictly for AWOLs. I would say there is quite a bit more to the story that what you already know. You will most likely never know the complete truth.
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Sgt Neil Foster
Sgt Neil Foster
26 d
Cpl Vic Burk - Without mentioning names, I asked another neighbor who was a retired Marine if he considered that Marine a Former Marine, or an Ex-Marine... his response was "EX EX EX EX!"

I would not be at all surprised if there was more to it than being AWOL... as you said, I will never know the compete truth, which is spot on for two reasons:
1. I moved more than 1500 miles away 13 years ago
2. The douchebag died from a heart attack. I know this only through my daughter who is friends with his daughter and is the Godmother of his granddaughter (the one who was being molested right in front of him as he played a video game
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Cpl Vic Burk
Cpl Vic Burk
26 d
Sgt Neil Foster - I can see why the neighbor said EX vs. former but as all Marines believe, "Once a Marine, Always a Marine." Like I said, if I knew a Marine received a less than Honorable discharge I would not recognize him/her as a Marine any longer.
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SSgt Christophe Murphy
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There is nothing wrong with being respectful and polite to someone regardless of what they did in the past. It's called being civil. I have a good friend who served in the Marine Corps who didn't receive an honorable discharge. I don't condone what he did to get a discharge that wasn't honorable and I said as much but I still consider him a friend. It's possible to separate two things and process them separately.

As for the story I am guessing there is a lot more to it. You don't generally see someone get court martialed for the single event of punching an officer. There is something else going on there but I doubt you will ever hear the full story.
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CWO2 Network Operations and Systems Officer
CWO2 (Join to see)
2 mo
Also, to add to the comments, Marines don't salute in civvies. Ever.
Edit: Punching an officer, especially while drunk would definitely catch an NJP and likely loss of rank/incarceration, but a serious beat down might warrant a felony malicious wounding charge. Even that, tho, a DD is reserved for pretty bad people, as others have commented.
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CPT Husband, Father, Endurance Athlete
CPT (Join to see)
28 d
I just don't buy the story "as is". I can only say that in my experience I would have needed to have had some type of bad blood with said service member to even know him and want a salute. That being said, that makes ME as the officer looking for a reason to put him on the carpet and bring him up on charges that would not have stopped at the company level and warranted a DD? This could be the full story but I highly doubt it? There are always three sides to a story though...the truth is out there.
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SSgt Christophe Murphy
SSgt Christophe Murphy
28 d
CPT (Join to see) - We all can agree there are details to the story that either don't add up or are missing.
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SSgt James Guy
SSgt James Guy
27 d
I was taught you salute teh rank not the man. A man in civies has no obligation to salute an officer in Civies, Nor does he have to salute an officer in uniform.
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SFC Retention Operations Nco
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You don't receive a Dishonorable Discharge for fighting. A DHD comes from being convicted in court martial, usually for pretty bad things. Things like rape, murder, major fraud and theft, child porn, etc.
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SSG David Spooner
SSG David Spooner
3 mo
Agreed SFC. There is more to the guys story than he is letting on. Striking an Officer while drunk would get you 45 & 45 at most. Not a DHD.
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MAJ Todd Mandley, MBA, FHFI
MAJ Todd Mandley, MBA, FHFI
2 mo
SPC Chris Ison - Don't forget that there is also the three letter separation code on the long form DD-214 that provide a reason for discharge. i.e. BLF – Drug use for example.
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SGT Eliyahu Rooff
SGT Eliyahu Rooff
2 mo
Regardless of the merits of the original story here, the question remains as to how we should treat someone with a less than honorable discharge. There's no simple answer, as every instance is different. There's a huge difference between, for instance, someone who's served in combat, been decorated for valor, and then gets on drugs and is booted from the service, and someone who's been a general screw-up from day one. The same holds true after people get out. Many years ago when I was a paralegal, we had a client who was convicted for killing his wife. Sounds like a horrible guy, right? What didn't come out in trial because the court ruled it inadmissible was that he'd served four tours in Nam as a Marine, had four Purple Hearts, two Bronze Stars and a Navy Cross. So how will you see the guy when he gets out? Criminal scum, or war hero? There aren't any simple answers to any of these questions.
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SSgt Judy L
SSgt Judy L
29 d
Lol Rape they are usually promoted
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