Posted on Mar 28, 2014
CPT Assistant Operations Officer (S3)
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How would your certain required schools and skills as an Officer or NCO translate to the civilian sector so that an employer will hire you and use those developed skills ?

Captains Career Course, OBC schooling, Warrior Leader Course, Advanced Leader Course, Senior Leader Course, Sergeants Major Course.

I wonder what developed skills from these schools could you use to translate onto a resume for a person either transitioning out of the Active Component or a National Guardsmen / Reservist, looking for a job in the civilian sector.

How could I as an employer use those skills towards whatever I'm doing and what benefits do you have over someone else that is either coming out of college or someone else with relevant skills from another job, but no military experience.

I was recently asking myself could the Maneuver Career Course help an Infantry Officer get into a position as a project manager ?

I just want some feedback to help me on this.
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CPT Zachary Brooks
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I feel that being a staff officer can directly relate to Program or Project Management while being a commander can be more so in a Personnel Management role (as well?). I feel that it can also be considered that those you work with such as LTCs and COLs can be the equivalent of Regional Managers or Directors in the civilian environment. I also feel that GENs can be directly related to C-Level personnel which can be a huge selling point on a resume.

I suffer from this same issue as people do not seem to understand the complexities of military schooling and leadership and I keep finding myself interviewing for nothing better than an entry level position with lackluster pay.

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CPT Assistant Operations Officer (S3)
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IMO for Officers, Project Management is a good area that matches your skills but what holds you back is the lack of experience in that particular industry.

You need the experience to get the job, but to get the job you need the experience. (Rope on the other side of the cliff scenario).

Project Managers have years of experience in that area and know the industry. That is why I believe your getting entry level positions, because they see your lack of experience, even though you have leadership and planning ability.

Some companies do have project managers out of school but haven't seen companies doing that since 1997 when I graduated.

Your right about Directors equivalent to LTC. Directors manage the section managers which would be equivalent to a Captain. Probably the COL. would be equivalent to a Vice President of a specific business unit.

(My actual job would be equivalent to a Sergeant or staff Sergeant, because I implement, and mentor younger workers.)

A Section Manager will manage the resources while the Project Manager (who usually bumps heads with the section manager) is in charge of the release of a product or feature.

An example, if our product are two way radios and your in charge of the release of a new feature. Let's say a feature that allows the cloning of a Master Radio with other radios in the field, you would be in charge of releasing the feature to the customer and the Section Manager would ensure that the resources are there for that project.

I would say your going to have to start at ground zero and also read on your own time on the products and "do what is necessary" to gain experience in that area.

Another thing looking at your profile is your TS/SCI clearance. You should be able to find something in the DC metro area, because TS/SCI jobs are abundant and with that they will train you because a TS/SCI clearance is extremely hard to get.

In DC it's like gold literally.

Another area that also is great is marketing. But the same rules apply.

For engineering, IT, or any technical field you need specific skills and certifications. Unfortunately the army does not teach C++ or any programming, but they do have certifications for IT.

When I came back from my second deployment I had to leave the state, my wife and daughter to get a job and rebuild back my atrophied skills from almost ground zero or be stuck at 40 years of age working two menial part time jobs or rely upon contracting, and at 40 age discrimination kicks in when you have no skills.

I did that in 2010 in 2012, I was able to move back home with wife and daughter. You do what you have to do brother.
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CPT Zachary Brooks
CPT Zachary Brooks
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Sir, its funny that you mentioned DC. My parents are in southern PA and I spent about two years applying to jobs, going to job fairs, etc in DC. Never got a call back, and interview, anything. Moved to NC because I was sick of living at my parents house and making minimum wage. Feels difficult to find opportunities much of anywhere, and I am not sure how much of that is wording on the resumes.
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MSG Anthony Makar
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I wonder if you were a course manager for WLC would that translate to a civilian job description as a Training Manager. Some of my friends are telling my that I should put on my resume's as Director of Training but I am not too certain that would using that would over sell me. But then I feel that maybe using Training Manager as my civilian equivalency job skill is underselling it also. Does any one have any thoughts?
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LTC Chad Storlie
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A new post by me on the value of military skills for business:

http://www.everyveteranhired.com/2014/04/16/3-military-leadership-skills-will-make-invaluable-civilian-boss/

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