Posted on Nov 9, 2017
Cadet MAJ Cadet
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Greetings! I'm currently a MSII in ROTC and an sophmore aviation student that is paying a boat load of money to obtain my degree and flight ratings. As NG minimum scholarship recipient I can elect to take $5k or full tuition and fees a semester. This year we found out flight fees do not call under said "fees".. My goal is to still to fly on the civilian sid, but It was brought to my attention at.
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CPT Nicholas D.
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The Warrant Officer route is an excellent one. As an MSII, you aren’t exiting at the final hour. As a Warrant Officer Candidate, if you are an E5 with BLC complete, you would qualify for the shorter WOCS (5 weeks instead of 7 weeks). At the end of WOCS, you would be appointed a WO1 and be in the cue for Flight School. This could all happen much faster than finishing 2 more years of ROTC. At least you will be a rated Aviator while finishing your degree.

As you know, as a rated Army Aviator, you would qualify for reduced ATP minimums and would be eligible for some of the exciting rotary-wing transition programs a lot sooner than if you finished your ROTC program and then went to Flight School. As a Warrant Officer, you will certainly fly more than your O-grade brethren and would accumulate those hours that you need faster for a civilian gig.

The board shouldn’t give you any heartache (at least our State’s board wouldn’t) if your goal is to be a Warrant Officer and an Aviator. The justification is pretty simple: “I love flying, I would prefer to devote my career to being a technical expert in the aircraft versus a more generalist leadership contribution. I want to focus on the flying!”

IERW will afford you a Commercial Rotorcraft Helicopter and Instrument Helicopter ratings. It will be a few (thousand) hours before you are making big bucks in the helo world flying medevac or oil & gas... but your ratings would support an easier transition to the civilian fixed wing side since you’d be working on Add-ons versus initial ratings. There are also a slew of Rotary Wing transitions programs being offered now that won’t be there forever.

I would definitely consider pursuing the WO route if it is something that is available to you.
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Cadet MAJ Cadet
Cadet MAJ (Join to see)
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Sir, thank you for the response.
That definetly helps lighten some of the worries. Probably my biggest concern is what WOCs is like for a 19 year old and how I could prepare for.
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CPT Nicholas D.
CPT Nicholas D.
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WOCS is going to be much like a return to Basic. There are some excellent forums on things that you can do to prepare. As long as you are a people person, moderate to above average intellect, and have no issues with PT, HT/WT, following orders, and attention to detail... you shouldn’t have too many issues. You will have former E7s, E8s, and maybe even an E9 in your class. Be a team player, don’t sham, and “take all guidance from the tower.”

Your greatest challenge will be the academic course load of Flight School and the constant dilemma of what beach you are going to hit on the weekends. Flight School will be one of the best chapters of your life. WOCS is simply the toll booth.
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Cadet MAJ Cadet
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It would probably be in my best interest to keep applying for the board as quiet as possible. My school is one only two schools in the nation to have a NG PMS. He is pretty interconnected with everyone. Do you have any advice on what to say if he found out I applied for the board haha?
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CW5 Sam B.
CW5 Sam B.
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Cadet MAJ (Join to see) - 2LT Dixon is on point and I just sent two 18 year old High School Students to WOCS and flight school. They are doing extremely well. I have a couple of college students going to pay their debt down from college. If you love the idea of flying as you have said, then Dixon's recommendation is clearly on point and there is no more demanding and rewarding flying than Army Aviator. Not many places you can haul sons and daughters in the back of an aircraft going 130MPH about 25 feet off the trees. Being a 19 year old with the end state and mindset of being a pilot, easy for you to kick and get after it.
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CW4 Counterintelligence Technician
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If your goal and primary focus is to fly - become an Army warrant officer aviator. You will never (probably) have to deal with the things the "O" ranks do. I went WO because I liked my job and didn't want to become an administrator - 1SG and CSM. Worst case is your "broadening" assignment will be learning to fly a different aircraft instead of some staff job.
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Cadet MAJ Cadet
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Another note to add: this is just a little thought i was having. In no way or how am I going to make a hasty decision regarding this. Just wanted others opinions on the topic.
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