Posted on Feb 28, 2015
PO2 Corossion Control Tech
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I still have a few years to decide, but we all know how quickly a few years can go by. I am seriously leaning towards not reenlisting. (I will have done 8 years by then) My decision on this is based on my wanting to move forward with a Nursing career that Active Duty service does not really allow time to pursue. What benefits, pay and time would I have to pursue schooling if I go FTS? Would I be better off just cutting ties and GI billing my rump to school? I would love some in site!
Posted in these groups: Military-civilian-600x338 Transition2000px-us-navyreserve-emblem.svg Navy Reserve
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Responses: 12
CAPT Douglas McDonald
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Stay in the reserves...financial impact huge down the road. In the medical community having existing professional connections will create employment paths unavailable to an ordinary civilian..(Who you know..!!??!!)
Health insurance also a big deal for you and spouse...no Obama Care issues. Life insurance is a big deal if you have a family to worry about..now or future..
Technical additions to your personal resume are invaluable..
do the GI bill to Nursing school and qualify for Officer NOBC..
You won't regret it..!!
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SFC Joe S. Davis Jr., MSM, DSL
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I would first follow your heart, if you stay in, go reserves.
Fulfill your obligation and you have benefits.
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MAJ Allen Tiffany
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I agree that the financial benefit are pretty amazing, albeit, when you turn 60, and especially because you already will have 8 years in. I don't know much about the Navy or the medical field, but I left active duty Army after 6 years, and then did 17 more in the Army Res or National Guard. No doubt it was tough: As an aggressive officer and with part of the time in an Enhanced Readiness Brigade, I often did 4 weeks in the summer and usually every third weekend at drill. And I usually drilled more than 100 miles from my home, so it was challenging at times. And after 23 years (total) I had to give it up. With 4 kids and an increasingly demanding job (to include overseas travel) I could not do a good job at everything any more, so something had to go. And it was hard to hang it up. That was really a hard day. But it was the right thing to do. But strictly from a benefits perspective, it is a great story. When I turn 60 my family and I will reap a lot of benefits that our civilian peers could only dream about and only achieve if they saved about a $1m in their retirement account. It may not work for you, but I do encourage you to look at it from all angles.
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