Posted on Mar 29, 2018
2LT Quartermaster Officer
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I have 10 years, (4 active, 6 reserve); currently drilling in the XO slot at a CBRN BN. Married, two kids, full-time student, 3rd year in ROTC, Wife has 8 yrs (4 active, 4 reserve), also a full-time student. I am currently working on my BA in Biblical and Theological Studies. Never got my chevrons because I was lazy and bitter. I like to think I have changed that in the past few years.

I like the Army. I buy into our ideals as an organization and the ADRPs that build us up as a force of change in the country and the rest of the world (even thought it sure as hell doesn't always feel like it). I like the people. I like the benefits. I love serving. But I'm no tough guy. I'll ruck my weight around and keep my mouth shut about how cold, wet, and hungry I am, but I"m no ranger. Doesn't mean I'm not a good leader. Doesn't mean I don't like doing Army crap.

So that's my context, here is the details of what I am asking:
I am primarily interested in Logistics and MI for the rest of my career. I think my degree might transfer well into those fields for various reasons. Though, studying theology makes me happy. I think we all make choices trying to balance what we think is useful and purposeful in the big picture of the Army and life in general, and doing what actually makes us happy. I have opinions on why I think Chaplaincy isn't a good fit for me, but bottom line is I need questions answered by someone with experience. Please help!

I like the idea of getting my MA earlier rather than later. I like Hebrew, I want to continue my studies in the ancient language (again, sooner rather than later). I like looking out for the wellfare of others. Had a bit of experience in this from the perspective of a 68W, which I was in the reserves. I did more than just ensure the medical wellfare of troops. I think this attitude can translate into the Chaplaincy.

However, I do not like the idea of being a non-combatant nor I am fond of the disconnection from the unit that I will have as Chaplain. That is to say, training and operations in general.

If anyone can offer insight, recommend some reading material, or offer their time for further discussion it would be much appreciated. I have about a year before I need to make my decision.
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Responses: 9
LCDR District Chaplain
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I understand the doubts about Chaplaincy. I had those myself when I was considering this route. But through prayer and advice from others, the doubts fell away and here I am (albeit in the Navy and no longer the Army). One of the best pieces of advice I got about Chaplaincy, and one that I will pass along here, was this: "If you can see yourself doing anything else in the military other than being a Chaplain, then that's what you should do." Chaplaincy should not be a fall back option. Chaplaincy is a calling. It shouldn't be something that we decide to do on our own.

Hope that helps. If you have any other questions feel free to contact me directly.

Blessings
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2LT Quartermaster Officer
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Thank you sir. I've heard the same about Chaplain work in the civilian sector and I agree with the sentiment.

I Suppose I tend to identify with Luther in my viewpoint, "Love God and sin boldly". By this, I take his meaning to be that we rest in complete freedom of Christ, thus we go to where sinners are and make their problems our problems, their struggles our struggles. I want to place myself where the work is to be done. If that means Chaplaincy so be it. Yet, when it comes to ministry, I feel that I can be effective in normal duties. Not in preaching the Gospel per say, but in other ways.

What I cannot see, academically, is studying anything else other than theology. My intellectual zeal rests in the study of God.
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CW5 Jack Cardwell
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Follow your heart. Thanks for sharing
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2LT Quartermaster Officer
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My heart lies in theology AND the Army. Yet, that doesn't mean become a Chaplain. Know what I mean sir?
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MSgt Dave Hoffman
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I should mention first that I came to Christ in 2005, at age 59. I felt a calling since, that led me to my current church, to evangelism, to Bible teaching, to becoming a Deacon. I felt compelled by God, each step I took, and I spent a lot of time on my knees throughout. Open your heart to the Lord, and He will guide you on the path He has chosen for you.

Deo Volente
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