Posted on Dec 1, 2015
SFC Infantryman
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I believe Infantry and Operators should be treated with a higher regard in the military.

Even officers and NCOs of all other military specialties should show respect to our nation's true warriors.

The general military is doing a good job of promoting everyone is a warrior but those non combat arms specialties do not train or destroy their bodies like true combatants. I would even say that infantry line medics and navy corpsman that are attached to the marines deserve the same regard.

This is not intended as a put down of other specialties but an awareness that some put in more than others in combat arms.
Posted in these groups: 53e46e2f 11B: Infantryman
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MSG Team Sergeant
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Allow me to be blunt... When I saw this notification I never thought in my wildest dreams it was by a fellow SFC. If antone does this for respect they are in the wrong line of work. With that being said, Respect given is respect earned. It takes 8 POGs for 1 Grunt, it's mutal respect that keeps the guys on the ground killing and burning. Every POG that doesn't do his job is a grunt off the line doing that job. As long as the POGs do their jobs so my boys get what they need that's all the respect I need.
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SSG Instructor
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Dude your wrong I was a medevac crew chief for everyone one of you that gets hurt it takes 2 pilots 1 medic and 1 crew chief so go ahead make your POG comments just know we never turned down a mission because one of you guys got hurt and I would do it all over again
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MSG Team Sergeant
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SSG Anthony Fowler- how am I wrong?
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SSG Senior Analyst
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SPC Shawn Clarke - I both agree and disagree. I agree that the CAB is handed out like candy by some commands, which I think is a disgrace and takes away from combat awards as a whole. However, I can almost guarantee I know a couple dozen Cav Scouts, Combat Engineers, Tankers and even a few non-combat MOS personnel attached to line units that have seen more real, close-with-and-destroy-the-enemy style combat than the average infantryman. Bottom line, I say keep the CAB but make it more restrictive. A mortar round landing 200m away from you shouldn't get you a CAB, but there are non-grunts who deserve to be recognized for the combat they've participated in.
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SFC Civil Affairs Recruiter
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SPC David Glines and GRUNT means General Replacement UNTrained. Aka the new guys.
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COL Jason Smallfield, PMP, CFM, CM
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Should Infantry and Operators be treated with higher regard in the military? I disagree with this statement for several reasons:
1. The Army is a team sport not an individual sport. Saying infantry and operators should be treated with higher regard is the same as saying a QB or running back in football is more important than the other positions, a pitcher in baseball, or a goalie in soccer/hockey. I argue that the greatest QB or RB goes nowhere without a decent line to create the holes.
2. Everyone in the Army is expected to be able fight, not just the infantry or operators. Again using a sports analogy, a kicker or punter does not do a majority of the blocking and tackling but they are expected to be able to block and tackle just like the other players. Is the kicker/punter any less a member of the team and should be treated with less regard?
3. Define "respect", "higher regard", and "true warriors". Do you feel that infantry and operators are not getting enough "respect" and "higher regard" currently? What are we talking here? More/better awards? More pay? Special ceremonies? Really?
4. Inconsistent logic. Not clear how you are equating infantry and operators with infantry line medics and navy corpsman. The latter are obviously not "true combatants" by a legal standard so not sure what definition and standard you are using. Other MOSs also "train and destroy their bodies" if that is the standard you are using. Some infantry (Stryker/Bradley) are much like Armor so should they be treated with "less regard" because they are not training and destroying their bodies like the light infantry do?
5. I am all for being proud of your branch/MOS but I am not sure why that alone is not good enough and "higher regard" is required.
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SGT Mark Rhodes
SGT Mark Rhodes
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Very well spoken COL Jason Smallfield, we are one big team and it takes all of us working together to make it a well oiled machine.
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MAJ Facilities Engineer
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Great words of wisdom, sir!
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SSG Headquarters Support Ncoic
SSG (Join to see)
4 y
Cpl Evan Kikla - They could probably spell "paid" as well though. The Col here is spot on, and if anyone is doing this for accolades or respect, then they are the people who need to go ahead and move out. We all have a role to play, and our missions are hard fought and failed when the people tasked to carry them out are worrying about what other people doing and trying to convince themselves they could do it better. If you are doing someone else's job, than you are not doing your own.
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Sgt Cannoneer
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PFC (Join to see) - Only boot grunts talk like that. Most of those pogues (not "POGs" could do your job at least half-assedly. But could you do their jobs AT ALL? Doubtful.
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SGT David T.
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After I stopped laughing hysterically at the complete total absurdity of this post I can finally respond. I hate to break it to you but your average support Soldier puts in more and harder work than you do. I started off as 11B and reclassed to 92F so I seen both sides. I worked way harder doing fuel than I ever did as a grunt. Let me put this into perspective. The last unit I was in supported a heavy brigade. The grunts came out trained for 30 days and went home. My unit was out there 120 days supporting them working 12-18 hours at a clip nonstop. So tell me how it is that support MOS's don't train. Oh and destroying one's body, try and lift a 4 inch bulk fuel transfer hose full of fuel and tell me how they don't destroy their bodies. If anyone needs awareness it is you. You have no concept of what it is that everyone else does and how they fit into the fight. Remember that the next time you need fuel, ammo, food, medical supplies, transportation, maintenance, medevac etc.
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1LT William Clardy
1LT William Clardy
>1 y
SGT (Join to see), before descending further into a pissing contest, please do me the honor of rereading the post you down-voted *in its entirety*.

Then consider the post it was written in response to:
"Honestly when I was 11B if I wasn't in the field I was sleeping, watching movies, or playing video games under guise of 'weapons maintenance'."

Then please explain what was so "ridiculous" in my post that it merited a down-vote instead of just reading on to what the next person had to say.
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1LT William Clardy
1LT William Clardy
>1 y
Also, SGT (Join to see), please let me know any place you find me expressing a desire "warrior" anything. You are far more likely to find me lamenting the way disciplined soldiering has been displaced by a "Warrior Ethos" and a blind worship of "warfighters" (a widely used term which nobody I have met can define).

I am an old-school soldier, so I do see differences and I don't put a high value on baby-sitting anybody's self-esteem. Putting those combat troops in harm's way and feeding them a steady supply of beans, bullets and replacements is every other soldier's raison d'être, and when the ones in harm's way are more valuable while they are there. Not better, but definitely more important at that time and place -- and, simultaneously, they must be more expendable because we will churn through a lot more infantry and scouts and combat engineers and medics than we will supply sergeants or pay clerks. And the tasks being accomplished by combat troops and support personnel are no more equal than a rifle round is equal to a handguard.

I have some very old-school attitudes for how I assign value, SGT Kozlowski, and I'm speaking from experience when I say that not all jobs are equally important to the mission. Not long ago, I disagreed very emphatically with a retired lieutenant colonel who tried to convince me that keeping soldiers' paychecks straight (one aspect of my current job) is a more "critical" function than keeping a logistical application running which was used to track the distribution of mission-essential equipment in theater (something I did a few years back). I have performed other jobs where I told the customer that the only justification I saw for my paycheck was that I was making the tools for micromanagement run more efficiently or more accurately than anybody else they were likely to have do the work.
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SGT Billy Cesarano
SGT Billy Cesarano
1 mo
He has a valid point but, he doesn't realize we already do, it isn't new, just forgotten and seldom taught and rarely broadcast. The CIB, Infantry rope and other ribbons and medals do treat them in higher regard through recognition. There are several opinions running rampant on this topic with very weak support from those who only looked on the MOS from the outside and never carried that 100 lb backpack, M60 in full combat gear on weekly 25 mile forced road marches cat napping on rocks, sand and standing watch in mud fox holes for years, training for the day to be prepared to confront the enemy eye to eye, fight and win. What he really wants to say I believe is respect for those POA's. It is an unaware individual that compares combat downtime for such sacrifice to their routine support function and the physical and mental toll it takes. Take a look at the data on how many 20 yr+ retired combat 11B's there are and the resultant quality of life and life expectancy compared to support specialties. While we are amazed by the NFL linebacker who manages a 10 year active line career with a richly rewarded salary and then sympathize with his complications from the rigors it took on his body, we neglect our troops that do far more for far less. This I believe goes to the heart of what started this topic. The toll this POA has on the individual and lack of recognition in comparison to all other support cannot be understated. Knowingly or not, these individuals volunteered for the profession. I did for the college opportunity I was sold on. Other's, to get away from something worse. Extremely rare is the well educated volunteer who is willing to sacrifice oneself for God and Country. Expendable persons and combat fodder. When the SHTF, Combatant commanders don't get off easy either. They must decide who will risk death and who will be spared, until the next day. Who is willing to assume that task in good humane conscience? Divisiveness of specialties is not new and garners a certain competitiveness that is beneficial to a point. What has changed is the original, well thought out and understood and historical (Valley Forge) purpose for special regard of all types and ranks. In today's environment there is an assault that has been evolving from those times to now. Today's military personnel have been raised and conditioned in a warped society to believe everyone should get a trophy of equal value in any contest regardless of contribution or outcome. We fight to win wars and conflicts that seek to impose these and like ideologies in other weak societies yet, turn a blind eye on it in our own. Failure to unite as one educated, American military and society and to recognize what is really going on, death by a million cuts, will inevitably lead to destruction from within.
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SPC Kurt Hesselden
SPC Kurt Hesselden
23 d
Not to rain on any 11Bravo's parade, but this 05Bravo has a CIB and carried a 80lb ruck, didn't have an M60, but a PRC25 and an M16. When not on the radio in a firefight I was on the line with the other riflemen. Ended up on more than most LP's and Ambush patrols since they all needed a radio so was in those patrols rotation more often. The 11Bravo's in my Company neither saw or treated me any differently than any other, we all went thru the Brigade Infantry school at BMB in Bien Hoa, even our 11B's and company of 75th Rangers had to go thru it. You just can't tell by the uniform in a firefight if you're fighting beside a bona fide 11B, and you really don't give a carp what their MOS is. Probably different nowadays, but I bet not much after 50 years.
On the plus side of the 05B''s, that 25lb brick of a PRC25 would absorb a hell of a lot more 7.62 and RPG shrapnel than the thin fatigues would, saved my hide more than once.
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