Posted on Dec 27, 2017
SGT English/Language Arts Teacher
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Lt Col John (Jack) Christensen
608
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No way should anyone feel badly about getting disability. First the award is for service related, not combat related, injuries and second the percent of service members who have actually served in combat is relatively small when compared to the overall total of service members served by the VA. I could certainly go along with some percentage increase in compensation if injury is combat related, but if someone receives injuries that qualify him/her for disability while serving our country they deserve every bit of it and should never feel ashamed because of it.
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SGT Christopher Helvie
SGT Christopher Helvie
1 mo
I agree. Part of my disability stems from being hit by a drunk driver while on recruiting duty.
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SSG Robert Perrotto
SSG Robert Perrotto
1 mo
Nope - I do not feel ashamed or wrong in any manner about disabilities that my Job accrued. When I went in, my MEPS Doctors recorded everything. When i was medically retired, the VA doctors recorded everything. The discrepancies from the time I came in, to the time I was retired were enough to award me 100% fully disabled. I also was awarded 80% Combat Service related. There were actual disabilities found while I went through the IDES process, like fractures to my bones ( knees, both ankles, and my right elbow) that were discovered and added to my list of claims. Part of this, is the negative stigma related to NCO's going to sick call. It took a nerve sheath tumor in my lumbar to finally go to sick call, and what they found , first on an x-ray (2 cracked vertabrae, and a herniated disc) and then on a contrasted MRI (the nerve sheath tumor which was causing the sever pain in my lower back, and down my right leg) - all the other stuff, I was sucking up and driving on, going through about 8 to 10 500 MG tylenols a day.
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1SG James Raby
1SG James Raby
18 d
I worked until I was not able to work anymore ( age 59). If not for my VA disability and whats left of my Army retirement after my divorce. I'd be on the street... No shame for me!
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SSgt Milo Ratbottom
SSgt Milo Ratbottom
1 d
I was exposed to a known carcinogen. As a result, I had to have my prostate removed. I have zero regrets about filing a claim. Cancer surgery changes your entire life.
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CPL Robert Ray
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I have noted an increasing amount of these kinds of questions since 9/11. Prior to that, at least in my time as an adult, there was no concern as long as the injury fit the definition of "Service-Connected." But since the War on Terror began, we have a whole generation of young servicemembers who don't remember the "Peacetime" Military. Many veterans who currently claim compensation are from that time of service known as The Cold War and have injuries accrued due to their service. Even the safest professions in the military carry a level of danger above that of a civilian career. People get hurt in "safe" environments. It only stands to reason that when you add guns, explosives and other military training to this that more (and more substantial) injuries will occur. Since the military does not have Workers Compensation, the VA's compensation is what's left. That's kinda what it's there for.
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CPL Randall Lee Bowman
CPL Randall Lee Bowman
6 mo
SFC Mario Rodriquez - I worked on the Burn Pits while serving on the DMZ in Korea back in 1988, so we had them too! Now I have out of control Diabetes!
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MSG Robert Ford
MSG Robert Ford
6 mo
Sandy Linden - D Johnson or S Linden, how do you know that many people are getting disability and never deployed? Where are you get your facts and information from. If you have ever applied for VA benefits there is a lengthy process. If they got disability then they earned it. PTSD is a trauma disease. You can get that from being rubbed and shot... at being in a bad accident... nothing to do with being deployed.
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SGT Dan Gray
SGT Dan Gray
5 mo
Sandy Linden - Ok I know one soldier who wasnt in combat because of his injury but is rated 30% for PTSD. Why? because when he was having a simple operation he woke up from the surgery, no oxygen or pain killers and had to kick the doctor with the leg he was operating on. He damn near died on the operating table. To this day he is absolutely terrified of white lab coats and needles, he cant be in the same room as they are. He even had to have a port put in his chest so they could get blood from him its that bad. And the Gas Passer never even had a medical degree or license. So I am sorry to bust your bubble but in cases like this, the soldier DESERVES the rating for PTSD. You should really know what you are talking about BEFORE you start talking or making accusations or implying anything
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MAJ Jack Horn, LPC, NCC, CCMHC, CCTP, CCTP-II, CCFP, CDBT
MAJ Jack Horn, LPC, NCC, CCMHC, CCTP, CCTP-II, CCFP, CDBT
2 mo
Speaking as a board-certified PTSD therapist, PTSD is not a “combat” disorder. It is a situational disorder. I work with veterans as well as law enforcement, medical staff, firefighters, and others with legitimate PTSD who never stepped foot into a combat zone. Police officers who have cumulative PTSD from working horrific accidents or having had near miss death experiences; children caught in a hurricane who had the house collapsed on them and had to be dug out days later; women who were serially raped; adolescents who were in a horrific accident and left hanging upside down in their vehicle for hours with their passengers having broken necks and other bloody injuries next to them. Yes, combat trauma frequently leads to PTSD, but it doesn’t have ownership of the issue.
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LTC Kevin B.
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237
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Not at all. If the injury is service-connected, it's a legitimate disability.
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SP5 Ron Rowland
SP5 Ron Rowland
7 mo
I paid my lawyer over 40,000, they earned every penny! The mental stress was just to much for me to proceed without them. Now I am able to buy my very expensive meds that the VA does not have.
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SFC Howard Holmes
SFC Howard Holmes
7 mo
Not necessarily true sir. I have a total of 36 years service, 21 AD, 15 Guard/Reserve. I have saved every bit of paper the military ever gave me, including my very first enlistment contract from 27 Mar 79. While stationed at Ft. Lewis we were in a train up to go with the 2/75th Rangers to get our hostages out of Iran. I was an MP and we were on Ranger support when I sprained my ankle so severely they ended up putting it in a cast for six weeks at Madigan Army Medical Center. When I was retiring in 2015, I submitted copies of the original docs from MAMC and the VA labeled it "Not Service Connected." Since I no longer wear boots, my ankle started really bothering, some days can barely walk on it, so I went for reevaluation for reconsideration. The ortho lady asked me if I ever wore ankle brace, I told her no, because I always wore boots so I had the support. She noted how swollen it was, and the minimal movement and flexibility. It came back that my ankle was "Not Service Connected." Now how in the hell, two different times, with (either DA or DD) form, stamped Madigan Army Medical Center, and some Captain signed off, and all of the little stamps, etc., and they still came out that it wasn't service connected. Them bastards at the VA make me want to puke in my mouth, chew it up and swallow.
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Sandy Linden
Sandy Linden
6 mo
How many are legitimate these days?
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Sgt James D.
Sgt James D.
3 mo
when I got out of the marines in 78 I went to the va like I was told by my CO I was sitting in a 10x10 room with one door and no windows a Vietnamese Dr came into the room and blocked the door! that did not go well! I did not go back again till I got out of the marines again in 1990! then it took me 15 years before I got my 100% they did that to a lot of Vietnam vets!
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