Posted on Jul 27, 2017
SSgt Civilian
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COL Strategic Plans Chief
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HA! Haahaaaaaaaa! Oh...wait. I think I actually peed a little. Be right back.

WTF are you talking about? Saluting and the greeting of the day are mandatory. MAN-DA-TORY. It's slop like this that is stripping the military out of the military. Why not let people wear what they want to duty? Wouldn't want to make them feel like less of a snowflake because they have to be subject to the oppression of wearing rank and looking like everyone else. It might bruise their precious ego that an emasculated society has provided them. There's a place for not saluting, it's in the field. They should have PLENTY of time to save their arm strength and pride when they are knee deep in mud and sweating through their uniform while forging something useful out of what society has provided to the military.

Not saluting...you just made my heart break a little inside, marine.
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Cpl David Banks
Cpl David Banks
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And maybe we can do away with all this “sir” stuff… I much prefer “Sure thing, dude!” to “Sir, Aye aye Sir!!” And replace push-ups with deep breathing exercises.

This is my crochet hook! There are many like it but this one is mine.
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MSgt Brian Gundlach
MSgt Brian Gundlach
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PFC Sammie Collins - Good point, problem is The military are not civilians. No matter what the current belief might be the military's purpose is to deliver hate to our enemies. That takes an entirely different culture and mindset than your basic civilian.
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SGT Charles Cameron
SGT Charles Cameron
18 d
Here's some history for you'all...In "ancient days"; all things to be carried were done with the LEFT hand, leaving the RIGHT free for fighting. Your weapon was on the right, hand-to-hand combat was initiated with the right hand and arm. A SHOW OF RESPECT and "combat readiness" has always been done with the right. This could be considered a "no brainer", but just try to protect you & yours with your "hand's full". Like the term of "yes / no sir" comment, where's that person's pride...? Just asking...
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TSgt Infantryman
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Cpl David Banks - Beautiful sarcasm.
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SMSgt Diana Pasterchick
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Edited 2 y ago
Is this a joke? If it isn't, that old belief, "there are no stupid questions" was just completely disproved. And FYI-- as an enlisted person, I truly respect the role of our officers, however, I NEVER felt the need to "feel more included" with officers. #WTF
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PO2 Robert Cuminale
PO2 Robert Cuminale
8 mo
I think the key is who raised us. Our parents had survived The Great Depression. My mother's mother was living in Nebraska. Between the Depression and the Drought the farms were wiped out. My grandmother said it was time to leave when the seed corn had been eaten. She moved to New York City where she had family from Ireland. She got work and married my grandfather. My mother remembers that they were very poor.Her father had a job at Squibb. He'd worked in shipping as a clerk but downgraded to the loading dock rolling 55 gallon barrels of chemicals onto the trucks. She said he stunk from the chemicals when he came home at night. But it was a job. With 20% unemployment most people weren't picky about what they did for a living.
Some trivia. I was part of a group rewiring Met Life's old building on Madison Avenue and replacing 11,000 telephones. Met served a free lunch to its employees and anyone who happened to be in the building. They'd started it in 1929 to make sure every employee had at least one good meal a day. It continued to do it when things improved. I was there until 1979 and I wonder if it is still being done. That was a time when employers valued their employees. Not today. Employees are just an expense, robbing the company's executives of ever higher salaries.
WW2. They managed to survive rationing but mostly they survived losing 400,000 family members and friends. 12,000,000 draftees went to war against their will. They were tested to the harshest conditions they'd ever feel. They came home and helped build the US into a super power. The past was past. They looked to the future. They did the best possible despite the past hardships.
And they passed it on to us. Are we living up to this legacy?
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PFC Jarrett Ohearn
PFC Jarrett Ohearn
23 d
i thought it was a serious joke for a moment...
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Sgt Luis Bonilla
Sgt Luis Bonilla
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Am so hoping that these young enlisted are being taught the CUSTOMS of all military branches it’s a custom to salute to render and respect this question should have never even be brought up WTF is going on in this country
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SFC Howard Holmes
SFC Howard Holmes
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PFC Kim Howard - What's even worse PFC Howard is back during the "Cold War" era, the Chinese weren't even considered part of it. They could not afford to equip their Army. Their fighting tactics primarily consisted of attacking in massive waves and the soldiers in the trailing echelons were to just pick up the weapons, ammo and equipment of those killed in front of them. The current problem is, not only do they have a well equipped military, but the Chinese government purchased our debt. The INTEREST ALONE that WE PAY, finances their military. So we are paying them to become an industrial, financial and military threat to us. Aren't our global politicians generous with our tax money? Thank you for what you do and applying your high intellect in support of defense to our country. I know Chinese/Mandarin isn't easy.
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CPO Combat Systems Electronics Leading Petty Officer
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Edited 5 y ago
If the junior members are feeling undermined and not included it's because they don't have an understanding of the custom. It is an exchange of respect initiated by the junior, reciprocated by the senior. Seniors are just as responsible for returning a salute as juniors are for giving one.

On a related note enlisted should not feel embarrassed when accidentally saluting another enlisted member either.
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TSgt Ollie Woods
TSgt Ollie Woods
17 d
I went into the shoppette one day and was amazed at the number of women in uniform with a ponytail down their back. I am so glad to be retired.
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PV2 Glenn E Moody
PV2 Glenn E Moody
16 d
when i went to Paris island for A grad ceremony I put my ARMY CLASS A UNIFORM on with my colorguard yellow cord and my INFANTRY blue cord ribbons and weapon badges years of service hash marks of 6 years service my discharge rank is only PVT 2 E-2 the young MARINE crossing guard saluted me I asked if she saw that I was only A PVT she said when in dought wip one out and she could tell that my uniform was older than the time it was 2005 my uniform was from 1981 she gave the respect of a veteran not an enlisted PVT all veterans get that respect from me & other veterans period in or out of uniform when i hear the music I turn face the flag & SALUTE I have done that since grade school cub scouts boy scout civil air patrol to my enlistment in the ARMY NATIONAL GUARD & to PREASENT DAY that is the problem with this country today i was raised to respect GOD & COUNTRY THE POLICE & ELDERS IF I GOT OUT OF LINE I GOT THE SHIT BEAT OUT OF ME PERIOD & IT MADE ME A BETTER MAN FROM IT not a spoiled peice of snowflake crap that don't belong in the military period
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PO2 Gary Goodlund
PO2 Gary Goodlund
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I was enlisted in the Navy from December 1966 to December 1976. Veterans have received much more respect in the last few years than in the first few years after the Vietnam period, regardless of your rank. My 97 year old dad (retired WWII Army) and I have been approached and complimented frequently in the last 20 years or so with the "Thank you for your service" comment. Sometimes it goes so far as someone quietly picking up a lunch tab with a smile and a wave, and sometimes by buying us a beer. It isn't expected but it certainly is appreciated. We haven't been in uniform at the time so that wasn't part of it. Appreciation and respect never goes out of style.
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PV2 Glenn E Moody
PV2 Glenn E Moody
9 d
PO2 Gary Goodlund - yes it sure dose not i never go out looking for it myself. but it is nice to get that thank you. when I went on my unit liberation tour of E GERMANY & THE CHEZCH REPUBLIC MAY 1945 we went MAY 2013 i was treated like I was there in 1945 we did have 4 WW 11 veterans that was there in 1945 I was born 1961 we had to go to alot of small towns not on our tour. but they knew we ware comming and we the 26th YANKEE INFANTRY DIVISION 1st 101st /2nd 101st/ 3rd 101st - and units of the 26th 104th when I joined the MA. ARNG 26th 1st 101st INFANTRY 10 DEC 1981 I did not know anything about the units history it goes back to 1635 the nations first Military of the AMERICA'S 4 Reg. of the Colony'S n-s-e-w. still under british rule until 1775 when the Contenal army was formed. ill stop it here don't feel like writting a book now
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