Posted on Jul 27, 2017
SSgt Recruiter
94.5K
3.07K
833
311
304
7
Avatar_feed
Responses: 502
COL Chief, Land Forces Division
366
366
0
HA! Haahaaaaaaaa! Oh...wait. I think I actually peed a little. Be right back.

WTF are you talking about? Saluting and the greeting of the day are mandatory. MAN-DA-TORY. It's slop like this that is stripping the military out of the military. Why not let people wear what they want to duty? Wouldn't want to make them feel like less of a snowflake because they have to be subject to the oppression of wearing rank and looking like everyone else. It might bruise their precious ego that an emasculated society has provided them. There's a place for not saluting, it's in the field. They should have PLENTY of time to save their arm strength and pride when they are knee deep in mud and sweating through their uniform while forging something useful out of what society has provided to the military.

Not saluting...you just made my heart break a little inside, marine.
(366)
Comment
(0)
Sgt Kathy OConnorcooley
Sgt Kathy OConnorcooley
2 d
I absolutely agree with you all. Showing respect for those who rank above you is part of the military life. I'm shocked that this question was posed at all. Sgt, USAF.
(0)
Reply
(0)
PO2 Joan Feledy
PO2 Joan Feledy
2 d
I can't believe this is even a question. What is happening!!! Now is not the time for the military to remove traditions and its way. If juniors or enlisted feel undermined or not included too bad, this is not daycare. We are here on a mission and that mission is not about you as an individual but your duty to your country. So these people need to grow a pair (I don't care if they are female either) if you don't understand the statement remove yourself from our great military. it is great for a reason. One should be growing as a person not cowering or crying in the corner.
(1)
Reply
(0)
CMSgt Martin Church
CMSgt Martin Church
20 h
LTC Edward Wozniak - Col we are dealing with "Millennials" or commonly known as the Me-Me Generation. All they can think about is themselves. All MUST VET our recrute better and or Basic Training must remove these thoughts of Individualism, this type will only get good men killed and have NO place in the military or in any organization that requires "Team work".
(1)
Reply
(0)
CMSgt Edward Cates
CMSgt Edward Cates
3 m
Chief Church has it right and I bet my crew chief nephew on F-16s would agree, he is older and more mature than his peers and has real problems with them not doing their jobs.
(0)
Reply
(0)
Avatar_small
SMSgt Diana Pasterchick
206
206
0
Is this a joke? If it isn't, that old belief, "there are no stupid questions" was just completely disproved. And FYI-- as an enlisted person I NEVER felt the need to "feel more included" with officers. #WTF
(206)
Comment
(0)
COL Jon Lopey
COL Jon Lopey
4 d
Doc: I have to agree with your response. Thank you for a candid but realistic view of military logic and reality! Semper Fi, COL L
(0)
Reply
(0)
CMSgt Martin Church
CMSgt Martin Church
4 d
I agree with you SMSgt Diana Pasterchick. As a senior NCO, as many of you have watched the DISCIPLINE in the military deteriorate, the leaders MUST take positive active to return the discipline required of any military operation. In all probability, this question came from one of the "MILLENNIALS" or from a Generation X or Y, the "ME - ME" attitude, meaning "Hooray for ME and to Hell with everyone else. In order to have a successful team, there MUST be DISCIPLINE, be it Military or in any successful civilian operation, but the "MILLENNIAL" generation feel that they all should be equals with the Leadership. The same goes for many kids that are first beginning a career. They feel as though they should have a "BIG HOUSE" the Latest model cars and a salary that took their parents a life time to acquire. Most of them DO NOT have any sense of responsibility for anything. I noticed that with the Military Awards Program, when they came out with all those worthless ribbons so these same people are at it again, to HAVE what the Leaders have spent many years gaining the experience and knowledge to be leaders. If the Military Leadership CAVES in to the saluting, then the military will be in BIG TROUBLE.
(0)
Reply
(0)
CMSgt Martin Church
CMSgt Martin Church
4 d
I total agree with SMSgt Diana Pasterchick. This question obviously came from a "MILLENNIAL" or a Generation X or Y individual with the "ME - ME" attitude, Hooray for ME and to Hell with everyone else. Most of them feel that they should have every thing that their parents and other have that worked a life time to acquire. A BIG HOUSE and the latest BIG cars and a salary that took their parents a life time of work to acquire. They want it ALL, without working for it. Saluting is a form of discipline and MUST be enforced, as a salute means that you recognize a military person of senior grade. The salute begin as a way to show that you were not armed when approaching some one. It is NO MORE than a greeting, just as we wave to a friend or speaking to them as we pass.
(0)
Reply
(0)
MSgt It Specialist
MSgt (Join to see)
3 d
I'm with you, Senorita! Of course you salute an officer, SSgt. That's a silly question. Being a professional (retired) SNCO, like SMSgt. Pasterchick, I've never felt the need to 'feel more included' with officers, nor did I ever have the desire. There are a handul of 0s, who are worth their weight, and all, but one, I was deployed with. The other one's my big brother...
(1)
Reply
(0)
Avatar_small
CPO Combat Systems Electronics Leading Petty Officer
151
151
0
Edited 2 y ago
If the junior members are feeling undermined and not included it's because they don't have an understanding of the custom. It is an exchange of respect initiated by the junior, reciprocated by the senior. Seniors are just as responsible for returning a salute as juniors are for giving one.

On a related note enlisted should not feel embarrassed when accidentally saluting another enlisted member either.
(151)
Comment
(0)
PO1 Chad Alcock
PO1 Chad Alcock
1 mo
Cpl David Hamilton - Sometimes we just see shiny and salute to cover our asses!
(1)
Reply
(0)
COL Jon Lopey
COL Jon Lopey
4 d
In my opinion, from the perspective as a former Marine NCO and retired Army officer, there are great and not-so-great officers and enlisted warfighters but many rise above their challenges and excel due to superior effort, scholarship, and motivation. We salute the rank and what it represents and that salute does not endorse the efficiency or competence of the involved officer. As a Marine NCO, I felt it was my duty to help junior officers and NCOs become better leaders by being honest and professional. The fact is, the vast majority of officers and NCOs I served with in peacetime and war were solid and capable leaders. The vast majority deserved the salutes they received and the rest still got the salute because it was the right thing to do. If you look at history, some of the best military leaders we had in war were those leaders who sometime in their careers suffered a serious setback or made mistakes. Thank you for great comments. COL L
(1)
Reply
(0)
CMSgt Martin Church
CMSgt Martin Church
4 d
PO1 Chad Alcock - Yep - When I first entered the USAF, I was instructed, "When in doubt Salute", which I never considered being less of a person, just recognizing the fact that the person I saluted had earned that courtesy.
(1)
Reply
(0)
SGT Gary Locke
SGT Gary Locke
2 d
When in doubt, whip it out!
(1)
Reply
(0)
Avatar_small

Join nearly 2 million former and current members of the US military, just like you.

close
Seg?add=7750261&t=2