Posted on Sep 30, 2018
Capt Daniel Goodman
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I'd already !mentioned a good deal on what I'd last sent in, however, I thought I might perhaps amplify and elaborate somewhat, to try and convey rather more of what the whole thing entails. For those of you who've answered thus far, please know, I'm certainly most indebted, and most eager to hear back from all of you further. It'd been mentioned to me that a good deal of what I'd sent in here or to others might've been rather disorganized, with possibly too much effort at tongue in cheek humor, so, for that reason, I figured I'd try to explain the whole thing rather more coherently, so all of you had an idea of how it all arose, and why I've tried to lavish as much time on it as I have thus far. A long time ago, in an undergrad class I'd taken on philosophy of science, I did a paper on biological automata theory. I had numerous aspects of interest in it, that seemed to jibe with other interests I had in digital design, and thought I perceived considerable overlap between the two topics, which, as I've foundz, is most decidedly the case. I also thought the research always had quite consideranle boomed potential as well as in AI, quantum computing, and numerous other related areas. So, I set out on what has thus far been a forty year quest to try to research it adequately, and, given my now total perm disability, I also needed something worthwhile to do with my mind technically, so this seemed a perfect project for the purpose. I've thus far collected, at minimum, 500-1000 papers, as well as gone through countless texts and videos, as well as chatted with technical friends, tried to chat with family (who unfortunately have zero interest or inclination,though my friends have), and also numerous serious bioscientists, engineers in multiple fields, CS/IT types, clinicians in many areas, as well as chemists, mathematiaicns, and physicists, along the way. My object is to try to adapt decompilation and/or disassembly techniques to being able to analyze genomic sequences of DNA and/or RNA, as well as proteins, partly due to the protein folding problem, as well as to try to find possible analogies in quantum neuroscience, which, in numerous instances, I have in fact actually found. I've also experimented with known open source Linux software in a similar effort to try to exploit it having been written for known operating systems, in an effort to try to use such a model to then seek to extend such an effort to the genomic case, which is obviously a genuinely unknown software operating system computing environment, functioning on the basis of, at least largely, molecular pattern recognition, as well as, in the quantum neuroscience case, quantum pattern recognition. Now, for me, the sheer technical difficulty inherent in such an effort has, in the main, often been its own reward, even of I haven't yet solved it, of course. Recently, I had occasion to stumble across functional and/or semantic programming, using, among other software, the Haskell programming language. I've found considerable biological overlap with that whole topic, esp the areas of formal comp sci (CS) called lambda or pi calculus, and the topic of y-combinators, which have very close similiary in terms of the software operation of recursion to he replication of DNA. That led me further into general combinator theory, as well as more generally into combinatory logic, not, not combinatorial, the word is combinatory. My object then, as I've envisioned it, is to try to take a general nonrandom binary sequence, be it from Linux or genomic origin, and find a means to convert it back to a software representation, in lambda calculus or other similar minimalist formal programming languages, then try to translate it into a higher order language more tractably readable and/or documentable, e.g., C, C#, PROLOG, Lisp, or any one of a number of other possibilities. By doing so, I've grown quite convinced that all disease might, and I must emphasize, might, be amenable to correction through software engineering, the same would be true for trying to advance efforts in antimicrobial drug resistance, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, or neurological disorders, among other conditions. So, hopefully, that, at least, might possibly give all of you a rater more coherent view of my thoughts, such as thy are at present. I regret if I tend to lapse into interpolated discourses, or the constraints of my disability preclude me from more direct involvement, however, basically, what I'm seeking are like minded intellects willing to join this Son Quixote on my questz of you will, I'd be most grateful for any further thoughts, whatever tey might be, any technical notions would obv be most welcomez, by all means. I must !erely emphasize that my researches into the whole topic have often proven quite arcane, and led me into some extremely deep areas of math, physics, CS, engrg, bio, and chem, that would take some fairly considerable explanation for all of you to understand, so, certainly, I entirely realize all of you obviously have your own normal day to day existences to deal with, of course, this just struck me as a quite good possible forum intellectually for trying to get some new ideas to possibly aid Son Quixote on his quest, if you will, many thanks to all, much appreciated in advance, obviously, as well, by all means.
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Donovan Fisher
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Who uses what software? My favorite is Lostdongle. And if you don't know what key emulation is and what it's for, but you have your own software, then you definitely need the services provided by Lostdongle. On their website, you will find answers to your questions and understand why I recommend them. And from my experience, I can say that the WibuBox key is https://lostdongle.com/devices/wibu-key-emulator/ a great option. Although, all the keys they have are good options.
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Capt Daniel Goodman
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Capt Daniel Goodman
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https://saner.aau.at/

This is one group seriously involved in software reverse engineering involved with the IEEE, this is the European one....
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