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the closest I seen to a standard uniform for the Armed Forces was the multicam uniform when I was in Kandahar, and Air Force all wearing the uniform at one point with few deviations. Would do feel about this?
Posted in these groups: 4276e14c UniformsOfficers_logo OfficersImages-20 NCOsDod_color DoD
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It’s been a few weeks, so here is "My Leadership Opener" for the week! SEE ENTIRE ARTICLE DOWN BELOW

Great reminder and easy steps to follow to build trustworthy leadership in the military and in the civilian world. The best part is, you can agree or disagree with the formula!

Do You Use the Five Ingredients To Trustworthy Leadership?
By Terri Klass
Leadership Skills Training Consultant

I happen to love baking apple pies. Through the years I have experimented with many different piecrust recipes, some containing butter and some containing shortening. Not all recipes lead to tasty piecrusts so I have learned to trust my past baking strategies and only incorporate a new ingredient if it aligns with my past successes.

Learning to be a trustworthy leader is similar to baking an apple pie. We need to take a hard look at what goes into being trustworthy and identify the core elements that make it work. We also need to look at the trustworthy leaders we have worked with and how they were able to gain our trust.

FIVE INGREDIENTS TO BECOMING TRUSTWORTHY:

1. Follow Through Like A Football Pass

Similar to an athlete being counted on to complete a strategic play, leaders too need to be reliable and accountable. If we make a commitment to our team members or people we are collaborating with, then we need to make it happen. If we want to be offered higher level assignments and projects, we must prove we will come through. The interesting part of being known as dependable is that we are actually building relationships and our reputation.

2. Highlight The Mistakes

We all mess up from time to time but what differentiates those of us who have built up credit with others is that we are willing to say we made a mistake.

Tell others that an error was made early on

Find a solution to rectify the mistake either by researching a new approach or by asking team members for their ideas

Share lessons learned so others can avoid the same misstep

Encourage the people we work with to be open about their mistakes by being understanding

3. Talk Straight

The way we communicate with people is key to how they relate to us. When we are honest with our feedback, respectful of their perspectives and speak with clear language, we will be more trustworthy. I had a manager in one of my leadership workshops who felt he should withhold information that people on his team didn’t need to have. After asking him why, he realized that by not sharing all the facts, it was impossible for transparency and real creative problem solving.

4. Listen For The Train Horn

According to Stephen M.R. Covey in his notable book, “The Speed Of Trust”, when we take time to really listen to someone first and get all the information, we not only build up trust with others, but the issues get resolved in a quicker and mutually respectful way. Covey poses these questions about listening to establish trust:

Have I really listened to the other person?

Do I really understand how he or she feels?

Think back to a time when you didn’t listen first. What were the results? What would have been the results if I had listened differently?

5. Give Credit And Recognition

Have you ever worked with someone who took all the credit for a joint project? I was coaching a manager who felt so betrayed when she was not recognized for her contributions. She felt she was not a valued team member and lost trust with her boss. I also had a manager in one of my workshops who felt just the opposite- acknowledged for his outstanding work. He was so appreciative to be given credit for his hard efforts and results and looked forward to future assignments. That is building trust.

What does a trustworthy leader look like to you? How have you shown you are trustworthy?

Terri Klass is a Leadership Skills Training Consultant and Speaker who partners with organizations to create cultures of empowerment and develop future leadership. She delivers highly successful leadership workshops and is a speaker and author of articles about leadership and working with the different generations in the workplace. Learn more about Terri at http://www.terriklassconsulting.com or connect with her @TerriKlass.
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Mark enlisted as an All-Source Intelligence Analyst in 1985, he served two years in the 82nd Airborne Division. He then attended the Officer Candidate School and the Armor Officer Basic Course in 1988 before being assigned to the 1st Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 1st Armored Division in Germany. During his tour there, Overberg patrolled the East German and Czechoslovakian borders and served as a Cavalry Troop Executive Officer during Operation Desert Storm. After three years as a cavalry officer, the Army transferred him to the Ordnance Corps. His first logistics assignment was to the 194th Separate Armored Brigade, Ft. Knox, KY, where he deployed to South Florida for recovery operations after Hurricane Andrew in 1992 and to Haiti as the Logistics Support Team Commander for the multinational Caribbean Command Battalion during Operation Uphold Democracy in 1994. After a tour as a training advisor with the 218th Heavy Separate Brigade (South Carolina Army National Guard), Overberg attended the Command and General Staff Course, and then was assigned to Fort Bragg. While serving as the Support Operations Officer for the 530th Supply and Service Battalion (Airborne), he deployed to Uzbekistan in early November 2001. Overberg further deployed into Northern Afghanistan in January 2002 where he commanded Task Force MeS and supported the French and Jordanian Armed Forces and US Special Forces. In 2004, Overberg was assigned to the Army G-1 as the Executive Officer for the Director, Human Resources Policy and later as the Chief, Drug Testing Branch, Army Center for Substance Abuse Programs, where he was responsible for the Army’s military and civilian drug testing policy and programs. He retired on 1 November 2007. Overberg was awarded the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star Medal (with oak leaf cluster), the Meritorious Service Medal (with three oak leaf clusters), the Army Commendation Medal (with four oak leaf clusters), the Army Achievement Medal (with five oak leaf clusters), the Valorous Unit Award, the Joint Meritorious Unit Award, the Army Staff Identification Badge, and American and German Parachutist Badges. In March 2010, after 2 ½ years as the Deputy Director, Personnel and Administrative Support Center, Office of Disaster Assistance, US Small Business Administration, Overberg became the Deputy Chief, Army Retirement Services within the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1. In June 2016, Overberg was promoted to Director, Army Retirement Services. Working out of Arlington, VA, Overberg is responsible for all Army retirement services policy and oversight of the program’s delivery to Soldiers, Retired Soldiers, and surviving spouses of all three Army Components, as well as strategic level program communications. Overberg received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Industrial Management from the University of Akron and a Master of Business Administration degree from Webster University.
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Those of you that have suffered from PTSD or currently working through PTSD, what was the first emotional growth experience you noticed after trauma? This was part of our last SAVL Group Support Meeting on SKYPE. Thanks for sharing for our veterans and service members suffering from PTSD.

Follow-on Questions:

How long did it take to see this first emotional growth?

Did others share in this experience or did you tell them about it?

Have you helped others with their post-traumatic growth?  How?

Do your good experiences happen more and more often for you now?
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I don't understand why other (mostly enlisted) service members bust on me for always wearing my dog tags. When asked why they are chopping on me, they usually don't give a straight answer; just continue to crack on me.
My dad (retired NCO) always said you should always wear them because "you never know what's gonna happen out there."
If its reg to wear them, why is it "uncool" to do so?
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I have worked with all the services frequently during my career. I see the ups and downs in each service. The Army seems to have the biggest attitude towards itself though. I would like to hear thoughts as to why Soldiers seems to talk bad or dislike the service that I love. Some may disagree this is true, but I do not think I am off base by stating this.

****FOLLOW UP QUESTION****

Do you think it is possible for the Army to ever show the universal pride in service that the USMC does?
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How much of a threat is China to the US economically and militarily?
Can you describe what you see now and in the future?
What makes you arrive at your conclusion?
Thanks.
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Since many of us have the opportunity to travel the world and visit historic battlefields, which sites would you say have been the most memorable for you? For me, it has to be Belleau Wood with a good Marine buddy of mine, and the site where the 3rd Infantry Division adopted the nickname, ''Rock of the Marne'' in Mezy, France.
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Command Post What is this?
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The US Army Values are Loyalty, Duty, Respect, Selfless Service, Honor, Integrity and Personal Courage.
Former Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl apparently forgot these when, on June 30, 2009, he deserted his unit in Afghanistan, where he wanted to, in his words, “make the world a better place.” Former SGT Bergdahl also forgot that he was wearing the uniform of the United States Army, and that armies fight wars. He signed up. No one forced him into service, and no one forced him to continue service if at any point he decided he had had enough.

In the Army there are legitimate avenues of redress of grievances, and now more than ever before. Your chain of command, the Chaplain, a JAG (Judge Advocate General) officer, or even the highest commander above where you think your problem lies. SGT Bergdahl had whipped himself into an almost psychotic state of isolation, from his unit, from his battle-buddies and even from himself. In the end, the enemy seemed more desirable than the mess he had made in his foxhole.

The sentencing of SGT (now PV-1) Bergdahl is now complete. Instead of a 14 year sentence, sought by the prosecution, a sentence of time served, a reduction in rank, forfeiture of pay and a dishonorable discharge will have to do.

Although Bergdahl had plead guilty to desertion and misconduct before the enemy, the circumstances under which SGT Bergdahl was released, the trade of five Taliban leaders notwithstanding, has its own implications of treason. Some have said that Bergdahl has suffered enough, including his defense team. Some say he is not fit to live, let alone wear the uniform. Several witnesses have testified about their war injuries and losses they claim happened because of Bergdahl’s desertion. There were rumors but no evidence that SGT Bergdahl had given the enemy critical information about the unit, its operations and Standard Operating Procedures (SOP). This would allow the enemy to anticipate the unit’s movements and tendencies, potentially deadly information. Some say, while searching for SGT Bergdahl, they were hit and men died. One man, a former Navy SEAL, claimed tearfully that his service dog was killed on one such mission, and others suffered crippling and career ending injuries. All of this was supposedly taken into consideration before the sentence was handed down by the military judge, Col. Jeffery Nance.

In my opinion, all this testimony is over-engineering. It’s all good, but shouldn’t be necessary to complete the project. Bergdahl deserted in a time of war. How do you maintain good order and discipline if you allow folks to just walk away? There is no claim of insanity. There is no plea bargain. There is no excuse. The punishment for desertion can be death.The reason for this goes back to the beginning of human conflict. If you run in the face of the enemy, you have abdicated your responsibility as a member of the group to help keep the group safe.
In our own Revolutionary War and subsequent conflicts, such as the Civil War, it wasn’t so much power and punch that won the day as it was which side would run first. Name a war or conflict, and what wins the day more times than not is the will to win or survive. Fight or flight. This is why the American Army is so effective; we are trained that in war the mission comes first. We are trained to never leave a soldier behind. We are trained to be good teammates. We are trained to care for each other, help each other and protect each other. And in the foxhole, when the bullets are flying, it’s about you and your battle-buddy, fighting for your lives.The bigger picture is that you are defending the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic, part of the oath of enlistment that Bergdahl breached. But if you allow soldiers to run and then suffer inadequate consequences, what are you telling everyone else who swore that same oath? What then does it mean? In our politically correct, social media, “If it feels good, do it” society, oaths and promises seem blasé and passé. In fact, they are our lifeblood. If we let one instance of obvious and blatant desertion slip through the cracks, what then do we do with the next one, or the next? Kneeling for the national anthem and the absence of even one American flag on the opening night of a national political convention are not simply warning signs, they are signs of the apocalypse that feed the idea that Bergdahl did nothing wrong. That he is innocent of desertion because he was oppressed and that somehow his actions were free speech. It’s not about any of that. It’s about loyalty. The number one most important Army value, and value in life. The acronym constructed out of the Army Values is LDRSHIP (Leadership). The Army aspires to train every soldier to be a leader. In the American Army, even E-Private Zero, Snuffy Smith is expected to carry out the mission if all the leaders above him are incapacitated, in the spirit of Audie Murphy. Murphy, the highly decorated farm boy turned hero from WWII who was battlefield promoted from sergeant to second lieutenant and saved many lives with his heroism, over, and over again, all at 5’4” and 112 pounds, carried on with the mission, time and again. We owe it to the memory of all those who gave their lives in defense of this great nation. We owe it to those who were injured and may have died while searching for Bowe Bergdahl, and we owe it to the future of this nation that Bowe Bergdahl’s punishment fit the crime. But the punishment in this case has not fit the crime in any way, shape or form. The echo from this proceeding will carry far and wide, that the perceived suffering of one man, a deserter, held more weight than the entire history of the military of the greatest nation on earth.
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I have noticed in recent years, at the cleaners I use personally and for our program dry cleaning, that many Soldiers bring in their Class-As and all their bling, and pay to have a them (likely by a military spouse or high school kid) set up their uniforms for DA photos, boards, and inspections... Yesterday I saw a Captain paying to have his Class-As set-up, and thought to myself WTF? A Captain, seriously?

I have worn the uniform since 1980, and still set in up myself? I always have. I always spit-shinned my own boots (daily) and even did at Jump School. I ironed my own uniforms for duty (yes I know we were not supposed to), and if I had questions, I asked a 1SG/CSM.

Anytime I needed a DA photo, I asked my 1SG or CSM to check my uniform and my photo. And, luckily, I got promoted/selected at every board...

I still can't believe Soldiers pay to have someone else do this, as I see this as a personal responsibility... But, capitalism makes it work... I guess after black boots and endless sewing on the Greens and BDUs... this is new market.

I guess I am just old school...

PS. I have a lot of crap on my uniform...
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Help my GI bill isn’t enough need help finding enough grants to finish! Private message me if you can help!
Posted in these groups: Gibill_02 GI BillGraduation_cap EducationMain_benefits_1335181026 Benefits
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This is mine. The USS Missouri (BB-63). I took this as she pulled alongside the USS Wichita (AOR-1) for an UNREP. The sense of history, and POWER was indescribable. I really felt the ship's presence in a manner I didn't with many others that came alongside.

How about you? What's your 'thing' like that?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Missouri_(BB-63)
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This question is for our Vietnam era Veterans here on RallyPoint. Share with us what your feelings were when you first received and opened your draft notice.

What was your stance on the war? Explain your opinion

Did your parents put ideas into your head about the war that you didn't nessisarly believe in?
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I had a altercation with a NCO at a range and after I wasn't thinking and was told to go shoot some of the ammo left over and I did it. I was unaware of it but My profile says that I can't fire a individually assigned weapon. It was brought up today by the NCO that I had a altercation with to my NCO. I'm going through a med board and awaiting orders to get out. Where does this leave me?
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I'm hearing/reading people saying "I'm old school, therefore..." So out of curiosity's sake, where is that ever-moving line?
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Do you ever shake your head ruefully at some of the posts on RallyPoint? What subjects irk you and why? Should they be discussed here?
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