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I know some states do not require a CCW Permit, I think this would infringe upon them (or not). Do you think it is a doable thing?
44 people commented on this discussion.
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Should the Army do away with Specialist Rank and promote Soldiers from Private First Class to Corporal? What do you think are the Pros and Cons?
Posted in these groups: Star Promotions
291 people commented on this discussion.
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I like to ask these every so often. You have a stellar performer who isn't theirselves lately. They're slipping in performance as time goes on i.e being later to work, attention to detail not the same, & silly mistakes. Finally, the wheels come completely off the wagon. You pull them to the side to see what is going on. They share with you that they have severe marital problems and it really is severe. How would you support them? I don't mean becoming personally involved in their personal life, but what support would or could you provide them?

JP
26 people commented on this discussion.
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There seems to be a few members of RallyPoint whose military service seems questionable based on statements made. When questioned about it, they usually do not respond. I'm not saying they aren't real vets, but is there a reason why someone wouldn't (or couldn't) verify their account? Just curious, because it seems easy to do and if its privacy issues you can always send in a redacted DD-214, and adjust your privacy settings.

UPDATE: Seems like there is some issues (at least with newer members) of having a problem verifying their accounts. RP Admins: Any suggestions?
Posted in these groups: 2dcac4a3 RallyPoint524395_331088503647420_191451722_n Stolen Valor
37 people commented on this discussion.
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This weekend me and my GF decided to get out and go to the movies not near any military base once so ever (maybe a Reserve or NG training facility could be near by). So I'm glancing around notice a uniform on a young lady and her hair down with a PT cap on inside of the mall. I didn't loose my mind at first because it could be anyone just wearing the uniform these days. As I get closer to her I notice she has on SPC rank. I told my GF that I have to say something to her and of course she didn't understand. When I approached the SPC and her civilian male acquaintance, I asked her was she in the Army and she quickly replied "yes". So I asked her did she know she was in complete violation of Army Regs she says "yes". The female rolled her eyes at me and I could tell she was going to have
a attitude with me so I quickly removed myself from the situation. So at what point do we as leaders make a on the spot correction in public or remove ourselves from the situation? I felt at the time as a NCO I should have done more to make her fix herself, but on the other hand I didn't want to make a scene at the mall and in public. SPC Ware I definitely will remember you forever.
945 people commented on this discussion.
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Looking for opinions and reasons for both.
Posted in these groups: USARNGImgres Deployment091812lineofsite1 Drill
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Do you feel there is still an "inner service rivalry" between the Service Branches or that any one branch thinks they are Superior?

RP Members what do you think - be honest and professional in your responses please! Thank you

With all the deployments and joint operations that we have been involved in over the last 15 plus years of war and prior to that as well, aren't we all part of something a little bigger than our own service branches? We represent the United States of America in so many ways! We represent the freedom that all of the American citizens enjoy, to include ourselves!

For myself, I think is great to that we have the Navy/Army/Air Force rivalry on the football field and other sports, but I think it is important to realize the importance of joint operations and synchronization among the service branches.

I don't think that anyone branch is better than the other. That is my personal feeling.

They all have their specific missions, training philosophies, challenges, and characteristics that make them unique and special, but does that make them inferior or superior to the other service branches?

I'm sorry if I didn't tag some of the specific service branches!
337 people commented on this discussion.
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I have a plethora of books that I have bought and read all or parts of for one reason or another, but I am nearly finished with War by Sebastian Junger and like the Documentary Restrepo it is amazing.
1. War- Sebastian Junger
2. The Filthy Thirteen, the True Story of the Dirty Dozen
3. About Face- David Hackworth (for good and bad lessons)
Most of what has been listed, and too many others to mention.
37 people commented on this discussion.
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https://warisboring.com/it-s-hard-to-tell-war-heroes-from-paper-pushers-when-everybody-gets-so-many-dumb-ribbons-9880c02e718c#.pm9dk9ofb
This article makes a compelling case for redesign of the DoD medal and ribbon policies. The solution offered, wearing valor awards on the right side of uniform, may not please many service members, but it's one idea. Please read the article and take the survey.
Posted in these groups: Ribbons-banner2 MedalsRibbons_logo RibbonsAp_medal_of_honor_mi_130111_wblog Valor4276e14c Uniforms
42 people commented on this discussion.
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So recently I've been flagged for multiple Failures To Report, as a result UCMJ is pending. I have accepted the consequences of my actions and am prepared to face them. I just wanted to know the extent of the article seeing as I'm still in AIT and haven't reported to my first unit yet. (No pun intended between the Failure to report and me not reporting to my unit. The FTR's are to formation) Help?
Posted in these groups: Ucmj UCMJHelp HelpExperience_logo ExperienceCollege-advice Advice
115 people commented on this discussion.
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Command Post What is this?
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Within our community, the community of service members and veterans, we often hear people complain or perhaps make fun of those who decide to wear their “- - - War Veteran” hats or some piece of flair from their old uniform. Many people attempt to call out that wearing these things is an attention-seeking tactic; a passive-aggressive way of poking each person that you encounter in public and whispering in their ears, “Hey, I’m a veteran. You’re supposed to thank me for my service now.” But I want to contest this opinion, and offer you a different theory.

If you have not already figured, I happen to be one of those veterans that often wears a pin, or badge, or hat that signifies that I am, in fact, a veteran. Many a time, you will be hard pressed to find me not wearing something that is easily recognizable as something attributed to the military. I have a dog tag that hangs from the short chain on a zipper that is on my leather jacket. On another one of my leather jackets, I often have a “combat cavalry badge” (which I know is not a real award) pinned just above the left breast pocket. I also have my good ol’ DV hat that is laden with little pins.

Yes, I like to have a little something on me, but it is definitely not to call attention to my prior service. Frankly, I could not care any less if I ever get thanked. In fact, I am, more often than not, very uncomfortable when someone walks up to me and says, “Thank you for your service.” Like most other vets, I really don’t know how to properly respond. So, why would I walk around rocking a dog tag or badge on my jacket, or a pin on my vet hat? Let me tell you why...

Many of us have a difficult time when we leave the military. It is a stressful time. The life that you have known for many years is over. If you are anything like me, someone who enlisted directly out of high school and spent my entire adult life in the military (at that time), it is a horrible shock to the system when you are thrown back out into the real world. For a while, like many, I dove into a bottle and swam around inside of it for quite some time. I eventually climbed out of that bottle and began working to get my life back on track, but it wasn’t easy. What made me want to get back up and try to succeed was the memory of what I once was.

You see, I believed when I left the military that I lost a part of myself; like my identity had been stripped from me, like I was a shell of my former self. I no longer wore my sergeant chevrons, or my beret, or any of the uniform for that matter, so obviously I was no longer a soldier. However, after months of self-reflection, I came to the realization that just because my time in the military was over didn’t mean that I was entirely stripped of the title I had earned. I was still a soldier, I had earned that title years ago when I stood up at my OSUT graduation at Fort Knox, Kentucky. That couldn’t be taken from me. It just took me a long time to see this fact.
Even though I had come to this realization that I could still hold onto my identity, time passed and I got further and further from the last time I polished my shoes and made sure that those ribbons were exactly 1/8 inch above the breast pocket. It became easy to slip back into forgetting who I was. That’s why I wear something, anything, always on my person. It isn’t for the looks, it isn’t to ensure that I get my 10% military discount at Applebee’s, and it certainly isn’t for strangers to come and thank me. It’s a reminder to myself of what I have done, where I have been, and who I am. It is a subtle reminder that I am no longer in uniform, but I am still strong, still intelligent, and still destined for greatness.

So perhaps the next time you see someone, man or woman, young or old, regardless of their branch of service or the conflict they served in, and they are wearing something that you recognize, don’t automatically think that they are looking for attention. Maybe approach them and talk to them. Ask them what they did, where they served, when they did it. Maybe that conversation will go a long way and help remind them of who they are. I guarantee that it will make their days just a little bit better, and you might benefit as well from the conversation.

Just remember that you don’t know what is going on in that other veteran’s head. Perhaps the last thing they need is a brother or sister in arms looking down on them for simply being proud of who they are. Sometimes, we all just need a little reminder of who we are, and who we used to be.
99 people commented on this discussion.
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So, I've received an email giving me assignment ''instructions'' that to report to Fort Hood this coming February, and I'm aware that SSGs and below do not usually receive pinpoint orders until arrival at replacement BN. Have any of you ever contacted a unit yourself in order to see if there is a billet, and have gotten assignment orders for that unit. My goal of becoming a Drill Sergeant did not happen because my branch manager said she doesn't assign OCONUS soldiers for Drill Sergeant duty. I have an itch to be an instructor of some kind and I found out that III Corps at Hood has an NCO Academy. Would be cool to see if I can get an assignment as an SGL. Any advice?
15 people commented on this discussion.
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All in fun 2LT's. We've all been new somewhere at sometime.
90 people commented on this discussion.
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So I saw my first military poser today at Wal-Mart of all places. Had Army ACUs, popped collar, what looked like a white turtleneck and Doc Marten's boots, patrol cap on indoors, no name tapes anywhere, Marine Corps Globe-and-Anchor on his pc, no unit patches and an American flag patch with no stars. I asked him what unit he was in, he responded with being an E-7 petty officer in the Navy.

Annnnnd, go...
Posted in these groups: 524395_331088503647420_191451722_n Stolen Valor
1966 people commented on this discussion.
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I recently attended an Air Force Boot Camp Graduation and I saw an Air Force SSgt (E-5) and an Army SSgt (E-6) each wearing an Meritorious Service Medal (Both with less than 12 years service). Now I know there are some difference between branches of service, but this was very surprising considering in the Marine Corps there is a very high standard required to receive the award. Opinions please.
Posted in these groups: Us-medals AwardsLeadership-abstract-007 Leadership
36 people commented on this discussion.
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I was recently reminded me of the importance and significance of mail call especially in the days before email, cell phones and texting existed in the 1950's 1960's, 1970's and I think through the 1980's. Waiting with anticipation in formation as a young enlisted man in sun. snow, rain or wind for mail call. The weather was much less important than hearing the names of friends called out to get mail and then hearing my own name which was wonderful. Going back to the barracks to smell envelopes from girl friends, read the letters on my bunk.
Later as a cadet at West Point one of the duties of the freshman class known as plebes was to distribute the mail to the upper classmen. It was a very important function and seemed to release a sense of common humanity and a brief period of humane treatment.
After I was commissioned in 1980, my mail was delivered to me except when we were away from home station when we would have mail call or else wait until the operation was over and then mail would be distributed.
Images: mail call wingen 70th ID WWII; Korean War early afternoon mail call brought these Thunderbirds in the 279th Infantry; Mail call! Pfc Glen Zachery of the 19th Army Postal Unit brings a sack of mail to the troops. Yongsan,Korea Dec 1970; Mail Call, Peleliu, 1944.
LTC Bill Koski LTC Wayne Brandon LTC Wayne Brandon SSG Jon Hill PO3 Bob McCord ] Capt Tom Brown Capt Seid Waddell MSG Andrew White SFC William Farrell SSgt Robert Marx SP5 Mark Kuzinski SGT Robert George SrA (Join to see) SP5 Robert Ruck SCPO Morris Ramsey SPC (Join to see)
63 people commented on this discussion.
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I keep seeing articles pop up about negative side effects from Mephaquin, an anti-malaria drug that was used in Iraq and AFG. Other than the freaky bad dreams, has anyone had other bad experiences or outcomes from this?
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When I joined the Army we Specialist 4-6 (SP7 had just been discontinued). It provided those Soldiers who had technical expertise and experience the opportunity to progress and earn more pay. However they typically were not "green tab" leaders and were subordinate in rank to a "sergeant" of the same pay grade (SSG & SP6). I've often thought over the years that the Army deleted a program that brought added value to the organization by discontinuing these ranks, as not all Soldiers are not going to be good leaders but should have the opportunity to progress based on their occupational expertise.

Should the Army bring these ranks back?
396 people commented on this discussion.
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