Posted on Aug 30, 2015
SGT John W Lugo
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http://dlug-assets.grvcdn.com/da/d0/ed/77/90/07/11/9a/e0/c1/14/5f/f9/89/b4/45 [login to see] 55e35cb704c9c3.08772788.jpg

HOUSTON (AP) — The man charged with capital murder in the fatal shooting of a uniformed suburban Houston sheriff's deputy will be arraigned this week, jail records show.

Shannon J. Miles, who has a criminal history that includes convictions for resisting arrest and disorderly conduct with a firearm, is due in court Monday. Court and jail records did not list an attorney for the 30-year-old Houston resident, and attempts to reach his family members on Sunday were unsuccessful.

His arrest Saturday came less than 24 hours after authorities said he ambushed Darren Goforth, a 10-year veteran of the Harris County Sheriff's Office, at a suburban Houston Chevron station.

Harris County Sheriff Ron Hickman said the attack was "clearly unprovoked," and there is no evidence so far that Goforth knew Miles. Investigators have no information from Miles that would shed light on his motive, Hickman said.

"Our assumption is that he was a target because he wore a uniform," the sheriff said.

More photos of Darren Goforth and the suspect:


PHOTO GALLERY | 1 of 6 IMAGES
































This undated photo provided by the Harris County Sheriff's Office shows sheriff's deputy Darren Goforth who was fatally shot Friday, Aug. 28, 2015. Goforth, was pumping gas into his vehicle when a man approached him from behind and fired multiple shots, Harris County Sheriff's Office spokesman Ryan Sullivan told The Associated Press. (Harris County Sheriff's Office via AP)


Miles' criminal record begins in 2005, when he was convicted of criminal mischief, giving false information to police and resisting arrest, according to records. In 2006, he was convicted of disorderly conduct with a firearm and sentenced to a maximum of 15 days in jail. He was convicted of evading arrest in 2007, and his most recent conviction came in 2009 for again resisting arrest. Records show that he was sentenced to several short stints in jail, anywhere from 10 to 6 days.

Goforth, 47, was pumping gas at a Chevron station Friday night in Cypress, a middle-class to upper middle-class suburban area of Harris County that is unincorporated and located northwest of Houston, when the gunman approached him from behind and fired multiple shots, continuing to fire after the deputy had fallen to the ground.

The killing evoked strong emotions in the local law enforcement community, with Sheriff Ron Hickman linking it to heightened tension over the treatment of African-Americans by police. Goforth was white and Miles is black.

The nationwide "Black Lives Matter" movement that formed after 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri has sought sweeping reforms of policing. Related protests erupted in Texas recently after a 28-year-old Chicago-area black woman, Sandra Bland, was found dead in a county jail about 50 miles northwest of Houston three days after her arrest on a traffic violation. Texas authorities said she committed suicide but her family is skeptical of that.

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Edited >1 y ago
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SCPO Investigator
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Actually, it's not new. It's a lot more dramatic, thanks to the Media and that POS in the White House, but we were targets back in my days on the streets, some 35-40 years ago. But back then, police were still holding onto the old days' ways. But it did change, and it changed pretty fast. Nothing like today with people in your face because back then everyone knew that was a real no-no. But we had criminal scum laying low for any unsuspecting officer. We had the on-duty murders but, still, the maliciousness wasn't as obvious. I will agree that a few people have taken to assassinating officers in ways we would never have foreseen back them.
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SGT John W Lugo
SGT John W Lugo
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Thanks, for your input. I agree that it isn't like it was in the older days were people had more respect for law enforcement. Media and our so called leaders are a very big problem for how thing's have gotten. Maybe it's time for us voters to elective officials to a 4 year term and if things don't change then out of office you go,no re election for another 4. Same goes for senators, governor's.
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Cpl Mark McMiller
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I think the attacks on law enforcement officers are despicable. I believe the majority of law enforcement officers are honorable and try to do the right thing. However, we have a saying in the Marines that one "Oh shit!" wipes out a thousand attaboys, and I believe law enforcement has no one to blame but themselves for the anger directed toward them. When law enforcement officers bend over backwards to protect bad cops and defend the indefensible; when municipal boards exist to give law enforcement officers immunity for their misconduct (Google Erik Scott gunned down by Las Vegas PD); when law enforcement officers act like they can treat us however they want merely because they are law enforcement; that angers people. A lot of police misconduct used to be "he said/she said" and was just covered up by the police. But with everyone carrying a camera around with them nowadays, police misconduct is not that easy to hide any longer and goes viral on the internet, causing many to believe that it is much more rampant than it probably really is. If law enforcement agencies want to quell the anger, they need to start realizing that we aren't willing to put up with the bullshit any longer and they need to start working within the framework of our Constitution instead of teaching their officers how to contort the law to get around it.
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SGT John W Lugo
SGT John W Lugo
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Thanks for your input, very well said. I agree that things within need to change but not by the continual killings.
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Cpl Mark McMiller
Cpl Mark McMiller
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SGT John W Lugo Agreed. Honestly, it is a very difficult job to be a good cop. They have a mountain of paperwork they have to fill out perfectly and they can get in so much trouble for the dumbest PC bullshit, so I can understand why even they don't want to be on camera.
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CSM Michael J. Uhlig
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We have a serious problem right now, a problem that only a few are doing the work for the masses. There is a shift in the population, where the respect towards those wearing a uniform is no longer respected. This year there have been 23 Law Enforcement Officers murdered additionally, look at the attacks on our service members. We are lacking personal investment into our country, so few are actually sworn to serve/protect/defend our country and the sense of entitlement is running rampant. And that, my friend is a serious problem!
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SGT John W Lugo
SGT John W Lugo
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Very well put,Sir.
I seen recent event were a black female stood in front of Law enforcement and Military personnel stepping on the flag,then got upset when they turned their backs on her.
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