Posted on Nov 8, 2014
SSG Gerhard S.
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Amendment 1
Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Amendment 2
A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.

Amendment 3
No soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.

Amendment 4
The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.


Amendment 5
No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service in time of war or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

Amendment 6
In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense.

Amendment 7
In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise reexamined in any court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.

Amendment 8
Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.

Amendment 9
The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

Amendment 10
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.
Edited 7 y ago
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CSM David Heidke
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Just a point of contention. These are not the amendments to the bill of rights. These are the Bill of Rights.

That being said, I think that they should be taken as a whole rather than the sum of their parts.

These Amendments to the Constitution were considered the most important to the founding fathers. Important enough to the the first. And it set up the idea that the document can be changed.

In my humble opinion, they all stand to support the others. These amendments should be defended in total, because if one falls, the others will be soon to follow.
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SSG Gerhard S.
SSG Gerhard S.
7 y
That being said, many of the Framers thought the Bill of Rights to be unnecessary. It was their contention that the Constitution enumerated the powers of the Federal government and that ALL others NOT enumerated TO them, belongs to the States, or to the People.
The Intent of the Constitution was to SO limit the size and scope of the Central government, that there should be NO question that Congress shall write no law, and that the right of the people shall not be infringed, and that we should be secure in our homes from warrantless searches. The States, though had a genuine fear that the creature they had created to represent them to the world, and to resolve disputes between the States would grow out of it's restraints, and wanted to ensure that these strictures on Federal power were specifically immortalized in writing and added to our Constitution.
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CSM David Heidke
CSM David Heidke
7 y
SSG Seidel, I like that interpretation. In a way I agree that if the powers of the federal government aren't enumerated, they don't exist or they belong to the state
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CPT Jack Durish
CPT Jack Durish
7 y
Your correction to the original post is on point, however, I beg to differ with your assertion that all are equal. Yes, each is important, but none could exist without the Second Amendment. It is the one that protects and insures all the others.
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CPL Steve Freeman
CPL Steve Freeman
4 y
But without the 2nd the people have no recourse against the removal of the rest.
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Capt Richard P.
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SSG Gerhard S. and SGT Jinger Jarrett Have put it well. The 2nd is definitely the teeth of the others. And the very people who are best equipped and trained to provide a part of these teeth are the ones most muzzled and restricted by law. Join us in pushing for the restoration of rights. Arm the Armed Forces!
https://www.rallypoint.com/answers/arm-the-armed-forces
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CW3 Network Architect
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This is why I hate discussions like this. Those that support the ACLU will ignore the 2nd in favor of the 1st, and those that support the NRA will ignore the 1st in favor of the 2nd.

Not only are all 10 important, but I think in a federal republic, the 14th is the 2nd most important. (Full faith and credit). I think the 13th is the most important...but then again my viewpoint on that is a little biased, since many of my ancestors *were* slaves.
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SSG Gerhard S.
SSG Gerhard S.
7 y
CW3 (Join to see), I am curious. Though I often see those touting the first amendment calling for the suspension of the second, I can't say I've seen NRA supporters calling for Congress to pass laws regarding the press, freedom of speech, or calling for Congress to pass a law establishing a Federal religion or to prohibit the practice thereof.
Do you have some examples in mind regarding your statement?
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SSG Gerhard S.
SSG Gerhard S.
7 y
Well Said CCMSgt James Weaver
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CW3 Network Architect
CW3 (Join to see)
7 y
I never said that the NRA was calling for Congress to pass laws regarding the press or freedom of speech, much less establishing or prohibiting a religion.

What I said was that 2nd Amendment supporters will ignore the first in their actions towards those who oppose them.
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CPT Jack Durish
CPT Jack Durish
7 y
You points are well taken and I fully appreciate your honesty in explaining your bias. Obviously, the question that inspired this discussion thread is based on opinion and every opinion reflects and underlying bias.
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