Posted on Nov 27, 2020
Chase Eddins
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I'm currently graduating college in less than a month with my major in agricultural business. Looking at just doing 4 years unless I love the military. just want the extra time to get my life together possibly. what are good MOS for civilian life. what branches ship fastest to training. which have best quality of life and resources available. anything you can tell me about the branches would be helpful? I'm looking at army right now cause it seems air force is very selective and takes a while to get into and I haven't found much on coast guard my top three in order currently are army coast guard navy thank you for the help
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SGM Bill Frazer
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The service is not here to make your civilian life better/easier. It is here let you serve something bigger than yourself, the Constitution and the Nation. We do not have time to let you get your act together nor grow up, etc. 6 moths after you join, you could be fighting for somebodies life in a foreign country. As Kennedy said " Ask not what your country can do for you, but what You can do for your country."
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Sgt Field Radio Operator
Sgt (Join to see)
1 mo
SGM Bill Frazer Well said. The military is not a summer camp where you go to get your life together.
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MSgt Electrical Power Production
MSgt (Join to see)
1 mo
I like your answer SGM!
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SGT Team Leader
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I’ve been in the navy and currently serving in the army. Honestly, it depends on your GT score from the ASVAB. The higher your GT score the more rates (navy) and MOS (army) will be available to you. Coast guard is similar to the navy.

Every branch is different regarding basic training. If you elect to go to the army, they’ll send you out based on availability if it’s one station unit training (OSUT) or for advanced individual training (AIT). Especially with COVID happening, I don’t know how they’re shipping trainees out. On the other hand, navy is a bit different. Once you’ve selected your rate you can decide when you’d like to ship out to Chicago.

Everyone has their own preference to their MOS and rates. I’d definitely looking into them once they gave you your choices and see what you like.

Resources are always available to all service members regardless of location. Depends what type of resource you’re trying to explore.

Quality of life varies per unit and varies between each branch. Life in the field is A LOT different than life in a ship.

What have your recruiters told you?
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MSgt Electrical Power Production
MSgt (Join to see)
2 mo
Pretty solid answer.
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Chase Eddins
Chase Eddins
1 mo
i havent spoke to a recruiter yet because i assume each one will try to sell me on their branch
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SGT Team Leader
SGT (Join to see)
1 mo
Don’t let the recruiters give you what they want. All about quotas. Don’t let them force you into a job you don’t want. I’d do research in what jobs they offer and what you’re qualified for prior to signing the contract. Graduating from college you should try and explore the officer route, too.
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June Mellinger
June Mellinger
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Speaking in mom mode....

When and if you go to talk to a recruiter, if you have someone who was and/or is still serving, regardless of the Branch of Service they may be in, take them with you.. They have billets they need to fill and sometimes if you aren't paying attention, or don't have someone looking out for you... They will put you in to fill a billet regardless of your ASVAB Scores.....

I know a young man that scored really high and recruiter tried to put him out there as a driver.... Luckily the young mans father was a Captain in another branch of service and stepped in....

Regardless though, the Military is a secure disciplined job with a reliable income which includes medical and other benefits that private sector doesn't offer...... Gets your foot in the door to bigger and better after a four year commitment to serve!
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SFC Senior Brigade Career Counselor
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Don't think about a job or branch that will make you a more marketable civilian. That's a common mistake. You don't join to be a good civilian. You're already a marketable civilian with your degree, free education is one of the best things you can walk out the military with. Join the branch you want because of the culture and the MOS you want because you'd enjoy doing that job for 20 years. If you like the job, you're going to stay on doing it and retire. If you like the organization you're going to stick with it. If you don't like the job you're not going to finish your contract and stay in that field. Don't worry about what transfers because if you like it you won't be a civilian for a long time.

What about after retirement, you may be wondering? If you stay in your field one of two things will happen. Either, you will need some more education and certifications to be competitive with your civilian counterparts (like IT, Cyber, HR, or medical) or you'll transfer into something very niche working for the government. You'll see the second one a lot with retirees who went to work at Range control, or barracks manager programs, or any of the thousands of MOS Immaterial jobs that need to be filled by someone with leadership and managerial experience. A very large amount of people choose not to work in their old field at all. Once you start collecting your pension, you have enough supplemental income to choose a field you enjoy rather than one that pays well enough. You can be retired in your early 40s collecting 40% of your base pay, plus any disability for years of wear and tear, and return to college for a degree in a field of your choosing. There's a lot of financial freedom in retiring at 40 with all your bills paid, house paid off, thousands of dollars of passive income a month, and a whole GI Bill waiting to be used.

So, don't think about what will set you up for success as a civilian, because you're either going to love it and stay, or hate it and leave. Think about how you'd like to spend the first term of service and what you'd like to be doing
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