Posted on Feb 5, 2016
CPT Jack Durish
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Let's eliminate the obvious. He has already been presented with the pros and cons of firearm ownership and the various arguments over the 2nd Amendment, and made his informed choice to purchase and keep a firearm for home defense. Of course I recommended that he obtain professional training in the proper maintenance and safe handling of whatever he purchases.

http://www.taurususa.com/product-details.cfm?id=199&category=revolver

I had recommended the Taurus .45 cal/.410 shotgun. Actually, I'm considering one for myself. It seems to me that having a virtually nonlethal round in the first chamber would be desirable for someone who might be hesitant to pull the trigger, even when he, his family and home are threatened. The .45 Long would then provide effective stopping force for anyone who didn't take the hint. Also, I feel that revolvers are inherently more reliable, especially in the hands of a novice.

Wouldn't you know it, California has banned the sale of this weapon because it fires a shotgun shell. Oh the horror! A .410!

I advised him to go to another state and get one if he really wanted it. (That's what I'm likely to do)

However, what other options would you recommend?
Edited >1 y ago
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Responses: 157
SSG Nathaniel Bendel
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I wouldn't recommend any firearm to someone who has little to no firearms training. The possibility for something to go wrong here is too great. My recommendation would be to start taking some classes at a local range or shop. Most have introductory classes for beginners and some offer classes to help new shooters select a firearm they're comfortable with. The training should happen BEFORE the firearms purchase. After that, it's simply a matter of what they're comfortable with. The debates will rage on about what's best; rifle, shotgun, or handgun. They'll just need to educate themselves on the subject and make an informed decision.
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HN Kathleen M Peck
HN Kathleen M Peck
1 mo
Great answers to the question of "Gun Ownership".
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CPL David Bixler
CPL David Bixler
27 d
Great answer.
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Cpl Mark McMiller
Cpl Mark McMiller
27 d
I'm going to disagree on this. Yes, training is important, and you should train if you own a gun, but your life and the lives of your loved ones are what are really important. The vast majority of violent crime is prevented merely by the victim having a gun. And, whether trained or not, common sense says your chances of survival are always better if you have a gun than if you don't. If you are untrained with your gun if and when you are violently assaulted, it is possible that something could go wrong, but what could possibly go wrong that is worse than you or your loved ones not surviving a violent confrontation because you were unarmed?
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PO2 Gerry Tandberg
PO2 Gerry Tandberg
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I'm in total agreement.
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SPC Elijah J. Henry, MBA
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Skip the handgun, get a Mossberg 500 for home defense.
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PFC Kim Howard
PFC Kim Howard
1 mo
SSG James Snider - Thanks so much for the glowing review of the Mossberg, I have been torn between that one and the tried and true Glock. I can't wait to get home and get to my local range to test drive that pistol and make that purchases along with the extended mag. God Bless Texas! I loved being stationed in TX. And if FL ever turns blue, GOD FORBID, Texas is viable option for residency. Luckily I have already acquired my insurance licenses for that state. Thinking about getting licensed in Wyoming and South Dakota next, plus looking to purchase a very large piece of property in WY. Home on the range with a range on the homestead! Yes indeed!
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SSG James Snider
SSG James Snider
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In snuggy, out of snuggy.. This is the extended to 9 rounds adaptation. the band is a grip enhancer/point of reference for your hand and changes your whole reference to the gun.
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PFC Kim Howard
PFC Kim Howard
28 d
That's great, thank you so much for sharing. Where you buy that snuggy?
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SPC Website Manager Www.Vietnamtripledeuce.Org
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28 d
SGT William Howell - Note: the .32 caliber balls that leave a shot gun using 00 buckshot will penetrate walls very well. I do agree that a short barreled shot gun is a good option for an individual with little firearms training.
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Sgt Aaron Kennedy, MS
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Edited >1 y ago
In order:

1) Shotgun (yes, I know it's not a handgun). It is the classic "Point & Click" mechanism. Generally speaking, you don't have to "aim" it, you "point" it, and you can point it from across a room AT the door. and still hit your target. Additionally, the racking of a shotgun has a very "distinct" sound akin to that of a rattlesnake in that it can cause visceral level fear in anyone that is familiar with it's sound.

2) S&W Revolver. (357 magnum). The advantage of revolvers is that you don't have to "clear" them. If you have a "misfire" you just pull the trigger again. Rinse and repeat. A .357 is a pumped up 9mm or .38, but it will give someone a hell of a bad day. Yes you only have 5 rounds, but generally speaking people have an easier time firing revolvers than pistols. Part of it is ergonomics, and part of it is mechanics. An additional benefit of the .357 is the reduced cost of practice (you can supplement training with .38)

3) Glock .40 or 9mm. I like "bigger is better" (my carry is a .45) but 40/9mm are generally the most popular so availability of ammo and accessories can be a big deal. Alternately look at the XD from Springfield (great gun and I like it better than the Glock, but it's just not as wide spread).

Edit: CPT Jack Durish Based on your edit, I provide the following "Better to be tried by 12 than carried by 6."

Taurus is the "farm equipment" of handguns. Inexpensive, reliable, and with good longevity.

However, the logic of having a non-lethal round in the SECOND chamber (remember it spins and the hammer engaged the NEXT round) gets a little more complex. I'd almost recommend and Empty one rather than Non-lethal. That adrenaline rush is going to happen and the trigger is going to be pulled in sequence until an empty chamber is hit, which forces conscious thought.
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SGT Chester Beedle
SGT Chester Beedle
1 mo
At 25 yards the spread of a 12 gauge with buckshot is only about 8 inches. The advantage of a shotgun or any long gun is that it's easier and faster to aim.
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CSM Bruce Trego
CSM Bruce Trego
1 mo
I like the shotgun with someone who is trained and understands how to use it. I would say that the size of the barrel itself would encourage an antagonist to leave them alone. The pistol is a good selection too. It has more than capable stopping power and, with .38 caliber rounds, can be used for practice relatively cheaply. It depends on which makes you feel comfortable.
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SPC Website Manager Www.Vietnamtripledeuce.Org
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Revolvers are hard to aim, and the trigger pull always pulls the barrel off target for the new shooter, or the shooter who does not practice on a regular basis. My sense is that a semi-automatic 9mm will do the job and is easier to fire. Yes, it can jamb, but if you purchase good ammuniation and keep the weapon clean, that should not be a problem.
The best firearm (personal opinion) is a pump shotgun with 18-20 inch barrel loaded with birdshot (say #6 shot).
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SSgt Ronald Krogel
SSgt Ronald Krogel
18 d
None initially for someone with zero knowledge. I would first want them to understand the limits and laws. Then use cases. Then take into account their health. My 83-year-old mother-in-law had to switch from a semi to a revolver due to arthritis. And we all made sure she had training. Safety first, always.

Not just the weapon, also need to take into account reliability, stopping power, and over-penetration depending on where you live, the potential for over-penetration hurting innocents, etc. So knowledge of different ammunition such as frangible rounds and stopping power are all good to know. And again, knowing the laws where you live. It is easier to identify what not to recommend, rimfire or long rifles.

I could not recommend anything unless they did research first and were willing to train. And if not willing to take a life, then nothing.
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