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I have a 2 part question,

part 1, I recently made the by name list for Sergeant DOR 1Apr2017 does this mean that I will be getting promoted I am automatically promotable due to my tis and tig according to my unit as I have not attended a promotion board but have blc.

part 2, my unit does not have any available 20 level slots for my MOS (91B). Will they send me to a different unit where a slot is available or place in a different slot? I am assigned to an HHC so I am sure they have non mechanic 20 slots.
Posted in these groups: Star Promotions
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As recruiters, we research and read all about how we can better adapt interviews to correlate with military experience. I'm curious to hear directly from military members what I can do to make interviewing a better experience.
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3fc4a628
A recent proposal has been submitted to the appropriate US House committee to swap the USCG from the Dept. of Homeland Security to the Dept. of Defense. Considering just past DOD matériel procurement and budget issues, would the USCG lose its unique identity if this occurred? Having served in the USN and USA before retiring from the USCG, I have real doubts about the impact of this idea. And you?
Posted in these groups: United_states_coast_guard_seal Coast GuardDod_color DoDDHS
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C99b2000
Currently, the Army is the only branch of the military without a national museum - seems a bit crazy, right? Good news though...one is finally coming!

The National Army Museum will be located on over 80 acres at Fort Belvoir, VA, less than 30 minutes south of Washington, D.C. The main building will be massive - about 186,000 square feet. Most of the rare and priceless artifacts that will be on display have NEVER been seen by the American people!

Learn more about what's coming, and check out the amazing design!: http://armyhistory.org/museum-design/
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Bf09ee8d
Employees always tend towards what is easy to do. Everyone’s expected to do more, with less. Time’s an issue. Energy’s an issue. Systems can be an issue. Managers must get good data. You need the right data to make the right assessments. You need your team to be able to do what is right every time.*Therefore your job as a manager is to make the "right" thing, the "easy" thing to do for your team.*
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Command Post What is this?
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6b81b4ec
Agree

There is a subtle distinction in the topic between America, i.e. the country, and Americans, i.e. the people. Had the topic been “Americans have nothing to fear…” the response would be a resounding disagree. One need only peruse the latest headlines to find stories of Americans injured and killed by terrorist violence, more often than not for the simple fact that they are Americans. But the country - the United States of America - has nothing to fear from international terrorism. The immortal words of FDR, the president who led the nation through some of its darkest hours, “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself” ring as true today as they did then. Terrorism, while a blight upon humanity does not threaten America, and the nation need not be gripped by an unreasoning fear of it.

Terrorism is the use of violence to achieve a political aim. It is the political aspect, or rather the motive, that separates a terrorist from a criminal, though their methods may be exactly the same. Terrorism is the tactic of the weak and marginalized, and often it is the first rung on a ladder of escalation, and seeks easy, “soft” targets that will provide the greatest shock value. If and when the terrorists are able to utilize other, more robust tactics, they can and do. But this weakness is also a form of strength, as other would be terrorists are inspired by the vicious underdogs carrying out spectacular acts of violence. The effectiveness of terrorism relies on one key element of human psychology however - fear. The mere threat of terrorist violence is of almost as much use as the violence itself when people, and by extension a nation, give into fear.

The level of fear that a nation should exhibit, should correlate to the level of threat. A threat requires a combination of motivation and capability. For the U.S.A. to fear a threat, the threat should be existential, or at the very least serious enough to cause fundamental, permanent changes to American society and government. In truth, the U.S.A. has faced mercifully few existential threats throughout its history, due to its unique geography, and other singular attributes. None of those threats, however have stemmed from terrorism. Of course there have been serious terrorist attacks that have taken place in the U.S.A. there has not been a sustained campaign of terrorist violence. While the motivation to carry out terrorist threats certainly exists, the capabilities have been severely limited. For all of its hype, terrorism is not a threat that should inspire fear, akin to the fear of a strategic nuclear strike by the Soviet Union, or a whole section of the country seceding and sparking a civil war, and the threat of terrorism can be mitigated by the U.S.A.

Though terrorism is a political act, as has already been stated, its methods are generally criminal in nature. The U.S.A. is blessed to have an effective, functioning criminal justice system. Law enforcement is adept, professional, and present at all levels, and the legal system is capable of prosecuting cases without fear of reprisal or intimidation. For all of their inconvenience, active and passive security measures at airports and other public spaces serve as deterrents to a terrorist attack. Furthermore the U.S.A. possesses an excellent intelligence and information gathering apparatus that enable it to disrupt most attacks, before they are carried out. Also, despite the real social and political travails the U.S.A. faces, there is no sizable, oppressed, disaffected portion of the population that is willing to engage in a terrorist campaign. On a more basic level, the materials that are necessary for a spectacular attack (e.g. high yield explosives) are much harder to obtain/produce and move without attracting attention. Finally the unique geography of the U.S.A. makes it difficult for foreign terrorists to enter undetected, for any would-be terrorists to find cross border safe havens, or for a foreign adversary to provide aid.

Naturally none of what has been mentioned should lessen the concern or the vigilance of individual American citizens, especially when they choose to travel abroad. By its very nature, an act of terrorism is unpredictable, and even the best intelligence and law enforcement organizations cannot detect and mitigate all threats. But America, its government, society, and very way of life are not in danger. Though the threat motivation exists, the means to carry the threat through is nowhere near robust enough. Americans should always and forever take comfort in the fact that they live in an exceptional nation that provides that sort of peace of mind, not enjoyed in most other countries. America, and Americans should remain vigilant, and respond appropriately to all threats that arise, but they need not be gripped by an irrational fear that will only serve the interests of an adversary.
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Nathan Wike is an officer in the U.S. Army and a member of the Military Writer’s Guild. The opinions expressed are his alone, and do not reflect the official position of the U.S. Army, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government.
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This topic was taken from the list “Fifty-One Strategic Debates Worth Having”, from the U.S. Military Academy’s Modern War Institute (http://mwi.usma.edu).
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COVER IMAGE
Terrorism Word Collage
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Today I learned I was being admin separated from the navy reserves for failing 2 PT test in a 3 year span (very embarrassing) Which is 100% my fault obviously. I know my RE code is going to be RE-3F and I know I can get a waiver to get back in. How likely is that going to happen? Will I be able to keep my rate in the reserves? What's the process?
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I'll be joining a unit that's going on deployment soon, but I won't be with them, thus putting me behind the curve on points. Best advice for the best and fastest route to E-5 and stay in the guard?
Posted in these groups: 79ad2ecb Promotion PointsStar PromotionsUSARNG
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Posted in these groups: Georgia ARNG
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Posted in these groups: Georgia ARNG
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I am trying to figure out where would be the best place for me and my family to pcs to that is open for 19K's that would be good for not just me but my family as well
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So when wearing ASUs, you wear all your unit awards (self and unit). When wearing the Dress Blues version (with bowtie), I know you remove your DUI. The part I haven't been able to find in either AR or DAPAM 670-1 is whether you only wear your own unit awards (as you would in a DA Photo), or if you wear your unit's as well.

Thanks to those who help out. NCOs can always learn something.
Posted in these groups: Unit_awards_logo Unit AwardsAfp_getty-511269685 Dress Uniform
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Posted in these groups: Cac_story_800 CAC
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479db597
If you have read some of my other posts, it should be obvious that I love genealogy. I have had experiences with the Sons of American Revolution and Sons of Confederate veterans.

What I wanted extra help with (from you gurus) is where to go find Civil War documents and pensions. My ancestor was in the National Guard and only served 100 days. It's making it much harder.

http://www.suvcw.org/
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I was just asked for a more recent certificate since mine is dated from 2013. I went on ALMS and that says I'm 100% complete and doesn't show an expiration date.
Posted in these groups: USARNG31m8esm34pl SafetyDriving2 Driving
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I'm interested in joining the Air Force as a prior service an going throug the school. Is this possible?
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Hello,
It's been a bit challenging for me as to getting some consensus on where I stand regarding my competitiveness for OCS. So I figured I'd just post everything here. I am 35 with a Bachelors of Arts at GPA 2.9 (yes, I know what your thinking). GT 121, AFPT 251, 2 AAR's, 8 years experience as an assistant professor overseas prior to service. Honor Grad from BCT. AFPT award from AIT (it was over 280 back then). On average I max pushups, my sit-ups are decent but my run time suffered alot being that I'm in the ER. Run time took a dive (from a 14:00 to 17:00). Seemed to happen to everyone I meet around my duty station.

I am currently working on getting my PT up to a 270. Thoughts?

If your wondering about my age and rank I joined pretty late at 33 years of age.
Posted in these groups: Size0 OCS
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