Follow the latest on RallyPoint. Get insights from the top online professional network for service members and veterans.

Most Recent Discussions

13
13
0
Ce9159bc
Have a funny interpretation or application of Army Regulations?

(I'm sure that not every regulatory base is covered in the ocean of wild possibilities within our ranks.)
86 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
32
32
0
1c965eff
Note: My friend Carlos is in the Coast Guard and sent me this question last night. He said he's not on RP due to OPSEC (whatever), so he asked me to ask this on RP on his behalf. He is pretty hell bent on getting this Soldier punished. Anyway, let him know your thoughts on the below.

//
I’m in the Coast Guard and have been active duty for 6 years. I’m stationed in Hawaii right now. I was up by Schofield Barracks and went on base there, and went to go shop for a few things at the Commissary. I was waiting in line for some fresh meat and there were 2 Army soldiers also in line, in front of me. They were looking at me and saying things to each other. It looked like they were laughing at me. I heard one of them refer to me as a “POG” which is a slang term I am familiar with from social media stuff. I said to them “Excuse me, I heard what you just said, and I feel disrespected.” I was just trying to stick up for myself. One of the soldiers then squared up to me and said “Yeah, I did call you a POG. Because you are a POG. You need to up and leave here – this is an Army Commissary.” A few other people in line heard this and started laughing. I felt so angry that I just left the building.

I know the soldier’s last name from his top, and I would recognize his face. What actions can I take to report him to his chain of command? What other advice do you have?
Posted in these groups: Deca_logo CommissaryUcmj UCMJUnited_states_coast_guard_seal Coast Guard
489 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
19
19
0
B7a0601
Posted in these groups: Imgres President (POTUS)Donald_trump Donald Trump
181 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
13
13
0
23fd9307
A570b121
0631e6fc
58297dd3
I went into DEP on 15 Feb 80, and left Newark for Fort McClellan, AL (by train) on 1 Oct 1980 as a PV1. Getting promoted to PV2 was cool, as was being promoted to Acting Sergeant (Acting Jack) after just two years, and getting promoted to Sergeant at 30 months TIS. 2LT was huge. But, for me getting promoted COL, after being flagged by the DAIG for over 36 months - for BS - was the best!!!
Posted in these groups: Star PromotionsUs-medals AwardsUntitled Memories
17 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
3
3
0
4e730255
By necessary I mean, realistic. Realistically would I ever use the training? I'm a pog, 25U to be exact.
Posted in these groups: Train2 Training
7 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
9
9
0
Edb5fb52
This is the flip side, what was the worst unit you were ever in or saw and why?
Posted in these groups: Images Military Career
195 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
0
0
0
2 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
2
2
0
The RP job listing below seems very vague. Any PWC representatives have in-depth info on this?

https://www.rallypoint.com/organizations/pwc-new-york-city-ny/jobs/885794-us-it-technical-administration-specialist
3 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
1
1
0
One said you can change your Mos After 4 years and it will be hard, but the other one said after 1 year and it will be easy.He mentioned because you know Farsi you can use this skill and change your Mos because the Army needs this language.
4 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
4
4
0
Ba04f1ed
I am battling back and forth with myself as to whether or not I am prepared to reenlist. Going through this, many options have been given to me whether I reenlist or get out all together. As far as becoming an Army Reserve Drill Sergeant, what would that entail as far as schooling / training?
Posted in these groups: Drill Drill Sergeant
6 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
1
1
0
What happen if someone failed ALC?
3 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
Rp-logo-flat-shadow
Command Post What is this?
23
22
1
422edf63
Agree — but put the K-bars away until you’ve read through to the end…

Whether the United States Marine Corps (USMC) should be part of the United States Army has been a question since the founding of the USMC, 241 years ago. But the true question is not one of Army vs Marines, but rather one of having a single service dedicated to operations on land, and the correlating operational, political, and budgetary influence that would entail. Throughout history, all the way up to the present day, the Army and USMC have shared overlapping, sometimes duplicative missions, doctrine, and acquisitions. Even the separate missions exclusively filled by the USMC today require Army support at some point during, or soon after the operation commences. The Marine Corps should be folded into the Army so that there is one branch dedicated to operations on land. But that branch should be more like the Marine Corps.

The first companies of “naval infantry” were raised in 1775 with the intent of providing the fledgling United States the ability to secure its ships, and take the war to Britain’s shipping and possessions along the American coast and overseas. Concerned with the immediate strategic threat posed by the British Army in North America, the Continental Army could not be put to the task. Therefor a separate branch was conceived (though under the purview of the U.S. Navy). In the succeeding 19th century, the notional missions of the Army and the Marines diverged and solidified. The Army concerned itself almost exclusively with operations on the North American continent, to include the American Civil War. The Marines provided security on Navy ships (which justified their existence at the time), but also began to develop a nascent expeditionary capability to complement increasing instances of gunboat diplomacy. These separate missions developed during an era with a general absence of strategic threats to the nation, an isolationist foreign policy, and a general distrust of a standing military, all of which kept budgets and manpower low for all services. Also throughout the 19th century, (what was) the Marines’ primary mission, security of navy ships, began to erode as the threat of piracy was greatly reduced, more and more ports were opened through other means, and the specter of shipboard mutiny was practically eliminated. America’s first truly overseas conflicts, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, provided a series of watershed moments that redefined the mission of the USMC.

Because of their presence aboard Navy ships and their correlating amphibious doctrine, the Marines were often the first U.S. troops to arrive in a given theater. During the Spanish-American War, Marines seized vital ports and harbors and provided additional land forces for combat operations. Upon America’s entry into World War I, Marines were among the first American troops to arrive in France, and later earned acclaim for their prowess in battle. In World War II, while technically still part of the Navy, Marines played a major role in the war in the Central Pacific as they developed innovative tactics, techniques, and procedures for amphibious warfare, and further proved their mettle against a determined enemy. These events, along with the vision and temerity of its commandants and political advocates, staked a claim for the USMC as a separate fighting force with a distinct mission, autonomous from the Navy. This has inevitably brought it into conflict with the Army, especially in years of budget austerity.

Maintaining a marine corps within, but autonomous from the Department of the Navy, is analogous to maintaining a separate airborne corps within, but autonomous from the Department of The Air Force (though one wonders if such a thing would exist, similar to the German Fallschirmjäger, had the U.S. Air Force began as a separate branch from the Army). The entire USMC is roughly the same size as the U.S. Army Reserve alone, and accounts for just 4–6% of the Department of Defense’s budget, versus the double-digit percentages of the other services (~31% for the Army). The Army, for all intents and purposes can, and has, performed the same functions as the USMC. For example, Operation Overlord, the largest amphibious operation in the history of modern warfare, is credited to the U.S. Army, along with numerous other amphibious operations in Africa, Europe, and the Pacific during World War II. Furthermore, doctrinally the Army provides extensive support to the USMC, especially in the areas of logistics, communications, and command & control capabilities. This is in part due to the USMC’s exclusive focus on combat (every Marine is a rifleman) and maintaining an expeditionary mindset, though even combat operations directly under marine command are usually augmented and/or supported by Army combat forces, which are just as effective. Most recently, the USMC temporarily vacated its expeditionary mindset when it became a battle-space owner in both Iraq and Afghanistan, separate from the Army. Taken in sum, this all leads to concerns for true unity of effort in a given operation. For these reasons, the USMC should be officially made part of the U.S. Army.

But only if the U.S. Army can then be made like the Marine Corps. The Army is a ponderous, vast organization, and contains a wide array of Soldiers and equipment, that are not necessarily amenable to a combat-focused, expeditionary mindset. When all things are reckoned, it is the unique culture of the USMC, fostered through generations and inculcated into every recruit, that makes it truly separate and distinct from other services, to include the Army. Furthermore, due to its small size and focused mission set, the USMC as an organization is adept at working with other services and organizations, and at leveraging influence within bureaucracy and politics. While the Army certainly has Soldiers and units that embody a similar combat focused, expeditionary mindset to the USMC, due to its size and wide array missions and specialties, that mindset may not be present to the same degree throughout the whole force. Additionally, many of the Army’s missions, outside of combat, simply are not riveting or flashy, let alone easy to understand and articulate to either politicians or the general population. These same concerns no doubt exist within the USMC, but are shielded from outsiders by its heraldry and carefully crafted narrative.

The best time to fold the USMC into the Army was at the transition between the 19th and 20th centuries, when the USMC was redefining its mission. The only way to do so now, absent a dynamic catalyst for change (e.g. dramatic budget cuts), would be if the Army itself became a like-minded organization, and was guaranteed to preserve the heraldry, structure, and capability of the Marine Corps. The Army would need to inculcate a combat focused, expeditionary mindset into all its Soldiers and systems, while still maintaining its ability to fulfill the various missions that require it to be structured as it is. This would allow it to better manage the rotation of personnel through marine units, though an individual must first volunteer, and then qualify as a Marine. The unique capability and doctrine of the Marines could then be transitioned to the Army. Within the Army structure, Marine units would then be utilized for their distinct capability (i.e. amphibious operations), similar to the 82nd Airborne Division, or the 75th Ranger Regiment.

The United States’ military risks nothing substantial, however, by keeping the two branches separate under the current structure. So long as the military is able to fulfill its core, fundamental missions, and safeguard U.S. interests around the globe, the current structure works — and, if nothing else, the Marines have earned the right to their independence. Notionally, perhaps even practically, folding the Marine Corps into the Army makes sense. But there is no reason at the present time to justify such a move, and all the pain and angst it would cause (even under the best of circumstances). It should be done, it could be done, but realistically it will not be done, and absent an extreme justification it should not be forced.

----------
Nathan Wike is an officer in the U.S. Army and a member of the Military Writer’s Guild. The opinions expressed are his alone, and do not reflect the official position of the U.S. Army, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government.

----------
This topic was taken from the list “Fifty-One Strategic Debates Worth Having”, from the U.S. Military Academy’s Modern War Institute (http://mwi.usma.edu/).

----------
COVER IMAGE
Created by the author
167 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
2
2
0
I'm getting released from National Guard to go Active Duty wanted to know how long is the process? I'm now awaiting to hear back from the Colonel at state.
Posted in these groups: Ae62b08c DA Form 41872316986927_56807405_scaled_231x260_xlarge Prior Service
10 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
14
14
0
When President Obama won, there was a deluge of complaints, the birther movement, a different brand of "Not my president." Now that President Trump has won office, there's similar sentiment. On either side, there is a lot of aggression being thrown around. Do you feel Service Members have a higher responsibility to be respectful of the American voters, regardless of their choice?

Respect of the POTUS is a given, we're expected, as service members, to render that. My question is more in line with respecting the fellow Americans that voted; it seems antithetical to me to be aggressive and hurtful to fellow Americans, especially those that have dissenting opinions from ours, for exercising one of the fundamental rights we swore to uphold and defend.
52 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
23
23
0
17367322
02273260
636c6a82
F6dc4571
Of all your great memories in the military, what was your very best day, and why was it?

- For me, of all the schools/badges, graduating from OCS, then Ranger School, were the very best. Knowing how many started (OCS-1-85 started with 270, and graduated less than 100 & Ranger Class 12-85 started with over 300 on day one, with 250 admitted, and graduated less 90...

- In terms of awards, there were many, but my favorites where these... (1) 1983, I was doing a color guard for 172nd Inf BDE change of command, and it was windy as hell... After we done, CPT Bucher, our company commander, patted me on the back, and said you guys did a great job, that was it... Just a pat on the back and sincere word. (2) Next would be getting my 1st Division 10th Mtn Div Coin from the ADC on REFORGER....

- In terms of singular memories, it would be meeting Saddam Hussien, and smoking my very first cigar with him. We were responsible for him, and as a Deputy Brigade Commander I had to visit him, and check on him daily, until we/I transferred him to the GOI for execution.
54 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
267
267
0
08a24fcb
Here's the background. You're a senior E5. Your troops are in formation and you're handing out work for the day. You hand out an assignment to a fresh E2 with less than a year in and only a few months at your command. They blatantly complain and tell you to choose someone else. You calmly tell them they will do this task and they tell you to shove it and give it to someone else. How do you react?
1809 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
12
12
0
How are Warrant Officers viewed in your branch of service? Is it a popular career route? &nbsp;Are they as respected as the senior E8s and E9s? &nbsp;Are there routes for Warrant Officers in your service to transition up to the regular officer corps?<div><br></div><div>In the Coast Guard, one has to be an E6(who placed in the top 50% of the E7 promotion list) or E7-9 in order to apply for the Commission. &nbsp;Some specialties are tougher than others. &nbsp;I just found out that I made it after my third application(once a year). &nbsp;In the medical career field, we have only 24 CWOs. &nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>The Coast Guard does not have the WO1 or CWO5 grades. &nbsp;After three years of service as a CWO2, we can apply for a promotion to Lieutenant(O3E). &nbsp;Is this opportunity also available for CWOs of other services?</div>
52 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
Rp-logo-flat-shadow
Command Post What is this?
18
18
0
Ff64fafe
So this is another subject that is real near and dear to my heart. I have been tossing around this subject for about a month and wanted to have a real candid discussion about domestic violence in our ranks. First, let’s define what domestic violence is. Domestic violence by its very definition is violent or aggressive behavior within the home, typically involving the violent abuse of a spouse or partner. This includes any behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, blame, hurt, injure, or wound someone. This is a real problem not only in our ranks but in our society as a whole and I am not there yet in believing that this is getting the attention and seriousness that it deserves. So is it? Is it not? Why or why not? What causes this chain or cycle of behavior? Is it because the abuser had it done to them through adolescence? Did they see it growing up in their own homes and determined that to be the norm? Most times, the answer is yes to all of these. Most times, that is. So then it creates a cycle that can be hard to break if not addressed and squashed immediately. How badly does this cancer affect our troops and how does their morale because of this affect the rest of the command? This sentence is just something to think about as all things in the military have cause=effect. Now with all this being said, if you aren’t too busy this afternoon, let us take a look at the various types of domestic abuse.

Physical Abuse: Hitting, slapping, shoving, grabbing, pinching, biting, hair pulling, etc are types of physical abuse. This type of abuse also includes denying a partner medical care or forcing alcohol and/or drug use upon him or her.

Sexual Abuse: Coercing or attempting to coerce any sexual contact or behavior without consent. Sexual abuse includes, but is certainly not limited to, marital rape, attacks on sexual parts of the body, forcing sex after physical violence has occurred, or treating one in a sexually demeaning manner.

Emotional Abuse: Undermining an individual's sense of self-worth and/or self-esteem is abusive. This may include, but is not limited to constant criticism, diminishing one's abilities, name-calling, or damaging one's relationship with his or her children.

Economic Abuse: Is defined as making or attempting to make an individual financially dependent by maintaining total control over financial resources, withholding one's access to money, or forbidding one's attendance at school or employment.

Psychological Abuse: Elements of psychological abuse include - but are not limited to - causing fear by intimidation; threatening physical harm to self, partner, children, or partner's family or friends; destruction of pets and property; and forcing isolation from family, friends, or school and/or work.

Domestic violence can happen to anyone regardless of race, age, sexual orientation, religion, or gender. Domestic violence affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels. Domestic violence occurs in both opposite-sex and same-sex relationships and can happen to intimate partners who are married, living together, or dating.

There are two main objectives here. Number one, let’s discuss the second, third, and fourth order effects of domestic violence in the military. Number two, for those of you that are survivors of domestic abuse, please by all means share your story and how you persevered. Only share if you are comfortable sharing. This a delicate issue intended for a quality discussion.
36 people commented on this discussion.
Avatar_small
Seg?add=7750261&t=2