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"(Unit Name withheld) BCT ordered to remove combat patches during training at Fort NoMatter so the ones without them don't get ‪‎hurt feelings‬.

Reason? "The unit just returned from Afghanistan and almost everyone has a patch but the large influx of new soldiers are E1 and E2s that have never deployed and they are saying they are left out because they don't have a patch."
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the closest I seen to a standard uniform for the Armed Forces was the multicam uniform when I was in Kandahar, and Air Force all wearing the uniform at one point with few deviations. Would do feel about this?
Posted in these groups: 4276e14c UniformsOfficers_logo OfficersImages-20 NCOsDod_color DoD
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Fighting against his poor and negligent leadership, on each and every step of his assignment, in almost a decade and a half of active service, an officer was errantly discharged to cover-up the mistakes of his leadership, clear thru to GOs. Fighting the system; this officer was diagnosed with PTSD. Was this diagnosis another cover-up or can PTSD develop in peacetime?
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It seems like duplicative effort for me for the US Army come up with their own light armored vehicle. Canada General Dynamics had this system for decades. The USMC bought it the LAV 25...hopefully, we see them upgrade to the existing LAV 3. River Crossing operations is one Army mission but the Stryker is not amphibious.The US Army is doing the same thing as it did to its most recent uniform fiasco and in Reinventing the wheel. Puzzle Palace Politics??
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6Szn-1TJVI
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E1-E9, W2-CWO5, and O1-O10. It has been that way for a long time. Enlisted salute officers (W, CWO, and O), W and CWO salute higher ranks, and Os salute higher ranks; however this is not where all of the responsibilities lie per say. In the navy at least, E1-E4 typically look to their E5-CWO5 and their Senior officers. E7-CWO5 look towards their senior officer; however the junior officers (O1-O3) look to the NCOs mostly to learn their trade before becoming senior officers. Do you think the ranking system needs to be changed?
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https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/how-i-lead-intensity-intimidation-maynard-webb?trk=pulse-det-nav_art
Got lost in RallyPoint Internet Space - CHANGED THE PICTURE - IT WAS THROWING OFF A FEW RP MEMBERS!

Here is another interesting article on Leadership! I wanted to get the RP Membership comments and thoughts on this author's perspective.

Lead with Intensity, Not with Intimidation
by Maynard Webb, Influencer
Chairman, Yahoo!, Former COO, eBay; Author 'Rebooting Work: Transform How You Work in the in the Age of Entrepreneurship.

'"The strategies in my arsenal to lead with inspiration instead of sheer will:"

Here is a snapshot:

More mentoring: Spend more time validating, cheerleading, and coaching. Praise in public, but coach and critique in private. Never make someone feel bad in front of his or her peers.

Paint the picture: In my earlier days. I used to tell people what to do. Now, I try to inspire them with what we should do rather than tasking them to do it. It’s much more rewarding to orchestrate a masterpiece than assign them to paint by the numbers — and the results speak for themselves.

Ask more questions: Great inspirational leadership means operating on a level that’s more than transactional. This means asking questions to get others engaged and invested. I often ask, “How do you think about this?” “Is this doable?” “Why do you think that’s a problem?” “Have you thought about this, or what about this?”

Raise the bar: The most powerful moments with an individual and the ones I love best are not transactional. They are not about whether or not you did what you said you were going to do, but focused on how we can do more and do it better. I call this “wonder mode” and find we are able to achieve it easier and earlier by making the previous practices routine.

In the toughest moments lead with intensity, but not with intimidation. Some of the strategies I employ:

Alignment through 1:1s: Communicate constantly. Determine together what success looks like. I encourage people to share problems early. That enables me to help solve them while I still can. No one wants to hear about issues by the time they’ve festered and are too late to fix. I end every 1:1 with a question: “What else do you need from me? What can I do to help you?”

Objective setting at the beginning of a project or quarter: Work with teams and individuals on establishing what we are going to achieve — and what’s most important to do first. I always ask, “What trumps what?” I believe in aggressive goal setting. That’s why I believe it’s okay if we hit 80 percent of the goals. If we hit 100 percent, I know the goals were not aggressive enough.

Keep it cool: Even in bad times, losing your temper is never a fine moment. Be patient.

More mirrors: Instead of telling someone what they did wrong and telling them how I see it, barking at them, “You missed a date!” Instead, I ask them to reflect on the situation for themselves. “Look in mirror, what do you see? What do you think? How do you see it?” Seeing it through their eyes is helpful for them — and for me.

Address performance quickly. My more inspirational leadership practices do not mean that I no longer hold people accountable. I work with them to help make them better, but if they don’t learn from their mistakes, repeat mistakes, or don’t live up to their potential and my demands, I will let them go — but I try to do it in a humane and caring way.
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It seems that everyone has something that signifies them as special or different from others such as the color beret, Stetson, buttons. How did this all start and why? Is it good to have or does it divide us between us and them....legs vs. Airborne?
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What would you do, if a passenger in first class "boo'd" a Gold Star family for being allowed to leave the aircraft first to receive their fallen son/daughter in the military?
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What happened in Benghazi is an aggravation, ‘a craw in our side’, with many veterans still today. It is a sad story of Americans being abandoned by their nation, and it’s unfortunately been used by many politicians for political gain. Excuses were made to explain what happened and to somewhat justify it. Both Republicans and Democrats distort the facts during TV appearances and hearings. But the damage to those left behind - the families and survivors - seems forgotten, without explanation.

Many Americans don’t even understand what these men and women went through - they were living in hell for the thirteen hours preceding the final assault and the evacuation from the CIA annex. Many incorrectly think that the four Americans - Ambassador Stevens, Sean Smith, Tyrone Woods, and Glen Doherty - died during the initial assault on the U.S. Diplomatic Compound. There was actually four separate attacks; the first attack on the compound and then three more on the CIA annex where everyone fled to after the first assault. Also, ten others were injured in these attacks. The compound was not an embassy, which means that it didn’t have the normal security detail or bunkering/protections that an American Embassy has. Only five diplomatic security special agents were in Benghazi at the time of the attack; two of them were there by chance, having traveled with Ambassador Stevens from Tripoli. One mile away, a CIA team at the annex was the quick reaction force for the compound, but no one was supposed to know that the CIA security team existed.

Ambassador Stevens was adored by many Libyans and had a great fondness for the country. He felt he could make a difference in the lives of those in Libya, and wanted to show the people that the United States stood behind them in establishing a new democracy. Eastern Libya, Benghazi in particular, was a key hub for intelligence operatives monitoring Ansar al-Sharia and members of Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb. Along with Ambassador Stevens, Secretary of State Clinton also wanted a more permanent post in Benghazi.

There was quite a bit of instability in the region prior to the attacks of September 11, 2012. There was frequent IED-related violence. The International Red Cross office in Libya was attacked and there was an assassination attempt on Dominic Asquith, the British ambassador. Requests were made for more security, but according to the regional security officer, Eric Nordstrom, they were rebuffed. Nordstrom told media that, for him and his staff, “it was abundantly clear that [they] were not going to get resources until the aftermath of an incident.” Lt. Col Andrew Wood, U.S. site security commander in Libya, testified that a regional security officer had tried obtaining more personnel, but was never able to attain a level of security that he felt comfortable with. It was pretty well known within the American intelligence community during the months preceding the attack that Benghazi was unstable and increasingly dangerous - and that a significant attack was imminent.

Top U.S. officials reported the attack as if it had been a spontaneous protest created by an anti-Muslim video...yet there were no such protests immediately prior to the attacks. There was, however, every indication that everything was premeditated. The assault began at nightfall, by militants swathed in flak jackets with covered faces. They were armed with RPGs, hand grenades, AK-47s, mortars, and machine guns. With that level of artillery, it’s quite apparent that this was not a spontaneous protest.

But for some reason...that is what we were supposed to believe.

Ambassador Stevens and State Department information management officer, Sean Smith - an Air Force veteran, died during the initial assault on the compound. The Global Response Staff team, which included former SEAL Tyrone Woods, left the CIA annex approximately twenty minutes later as the Quick Reaction Force in order to aid and/or rescue everyone at the compound. The Quick Reaction Force evacuated everyone from the compound to the CIA annex where they began preparing for potential continuing assaults.

In the ensuing hours, attacks continued as they bunkered at the CIA annex waiting for reinforcements or rescue. Meanwhile another former Navy SEAL, Glen Doherty, and six other men (five CIA operatives and two volunteer Delta operators) gathered at the Tripoli Embassy preparing to mount a rescue - 406 miles away from Benghazi. Since this was not a planned evacuation or rescue attempt by U.S. leadership, they had to figure some way to get to Benghazi. They somehow garnered $30,000 and, with a little persuasion of a couple of Libyan military pilots, they got them to fly from the airport in Tripoli to Benghazi.

At the Benghazi airport, they met up with supportive Libyan troops who took the team of seven men to the CIA annex. Upon arrival, Glen Doherty met Tyrone Woods on the roof of the annex. Within minutes, mortars were fired and both were mortally wounded - two more Americans killed in Benghazi within hours. After this final assault, everyone remaining was transported to the Benghazi airport with the help of the same Libyan troops who assisted Glen Doherty and his team.

The whole incident is very disappointing to me, and something I will never forget. We, as Airmen, Soldiers, Marines and Sailors, exist under an oath stating that we will “never leave our brothers and sisters behind”... but these people were left to die. They were left alone - abandoned by the administration, Congress, and in a sense, by their country. Their families also seemed to be forgotten as they never received any explanation regarding this incident. The names of everyone else who had been in Benghazi were also quickly forgotten. It seemed as though many Americans heard enough and didn’t want the truth regardless of the facts...and still don’t. Overall, the incidents that day were incredibly tragic, and I will continue to hope that someday everyone will have the answers they need!
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I bring up this question because my wife was treated very poorly by another spouse because of my rank! Here husband is a Major in the Marines and she has told others that is the reason she doesn't like my wife.

Why play the "Rank Card?" RP Members your thoughts?

Why is this still happening in our veteran and retirement community? I've always addressed service members here on RP by their rank initially out of respect for what they have accomplished and then I drop it and start addressing them by their first name as much as possible. Accordingly, RP allows you to highlight the name of another member, so your RP Connections will receive an email and the rank is required - got it!

I think once we leave the service there shouldn't be a stereotyping of rank or service - we should get along and respect each other as veterans and retirees that served a "common purpose!" Again, this just my opinion!

By thw way my wife has never played the "rank card" and never will!
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I have found yet another fake here. Danny Erickson. I think I am getting good at this. But when you see a person claiming to be an SF officer you would expect them to provide a better story than this. This fake has been in since Somalia and is still a CPT. But don’t worry. He has also been in Hollywood working with the Mighty Morphing Power Rangers. But he still had time to hit just about every conflict in the past few decades. He should have at least one star on his CIB if not 2 stars. I love how he went to Alpha base at Benning. I guess I wasn't cool enough to be there. And to do all of this as a CPT, pretty impressive.


This comes from his own Bio. This bio was supposedly developed from an interview in 1995. Please excuse the grammer. This reporter couldn’t seem to find a single period in this essay on how awesome Danny was.
1. His Mother had once shot for them ,the quickly Sponsored Denny and Archery Became just as if not more Important than Martial Arts and Gymnastics which was Great because at 9 years old He had Reached 150lbs and 5'4" Which for a 9 year old was pretty large
2. By Sophmore year Denny Was Already being bussed to William Rainey Harper College to start Gen Ed and Law Enforcement Classes , at 17 he Opted to Enlist On the Concurrent Enrollment Option Basic and AIT while finishing his Degree in Business Admin With Minor in Law Enforcement Studies ,He Graduated AIT 2nd Lt. And Was Sent to Alpha Camp outside Ft.Benning Ga, and then Fort Cambell Ky, 101st ABN Air Assault ,75th Ranger Training Corps.
3. The Then Very Green 2nd Lt. Was Deployed to Kuwait and then to Panama then Back to Saudi ,Kuwait and Afghanistan . Upon Visiting Home He was Offered Work as a Martial Arts Stunts Trainer for MMPR by an acquaintance starring in the show , for the next few years arranging his leave around the filming schedules .
4. After reporting back to the Army during a routine Halo with Canine Insertion Jump , Denny Sustained a Career ending Injury , Broken Neck C5-7 and T6-10 .
5. Den Erickson was a Martial Arts And Tactical Instructor For DOD/DOJ in the Midwest ,Recently Specializing In Canine Deployment . Teaches Krav Maga , Holds an 8th Dan Shotokan Karate ( Rank Of Kyoshi) Practices Kyujutsu /Kyudo (Japanese Archery) Fought MMA in His Youth To Keep His Edge ,was often Disqualified for Being too Aggressive, the Fights Had with Oleg Taktarov and Dan Severn Among his Best were Draws with MMA in its infancy was not legal in most states at the time .

If you go to his IMDb page you can read the whole thing but if he takes it down you can still read it in the photos.

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm7583758/bio?ref_=nm_dyk_trv_sm#trivia

http://www.rallypoint.com/profiles/567130-18a-special-forces-officer
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Most of us look to something to get us by on a day to day basis. Is there a necklace, charm or anything else that you keep on your person at all times?
Posted in these groups: Dog_tags_logo Dog TagsGeneral_of_the_army_rank_insignia OfficerEnlisted_logo Enlisted
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I am working on a BA degree and almost done. I am thinking of joining either the national guard or reserve and going in as an officer.
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You may be one of the thousands upon thousands who are seeking compensation from the Military for an injury or mental situation you are facing. You are not alone.
What follows are some suggestion to hopefully help you on your journey. Please know that these are just suggestions and will not necessarily get you compensation.

One of the things I learned quickly is that the older you are the harder it is to get compensation. I was in the Military from 1959-1962. I was deployed to Korea in 1960. This was not war time. This was not Vietnam. I was in between all of that. I was selected to be in the Army Security Agency (somewhat like the Military CIA). My training was to be a radio/teletype operator; MOS 053-10. I monitored the airways for breaches in security. It was not an exciting job, and there were hours upon hours of nothing while working. Once and awhile it got interesting, like when a Colonel came on the air and invited all of his officer friends to his drunken party. He even gave directions, and contact information over the air. I jumped on it immediately and contacted the Local MPS. They were at his spot within minutes, and stopped the “party.” He was later busted.

Your job was to never take the earphones off of your ears. You had to spend every minute (for twelve hour shifts) listening to air ways and picking up Morse code messages.
The static was pretty intense at times, even more when you had to take one side of the earphones off and try to adjust the frequency of the receptor. Again, I had to leave the earphones on. This took a heavy toll on my hearing. I had tinnitus (ringing in the ears) coming on. I had headaches during my off duty times. But, during my time in the Military, and I am sure still now, it was duty first. You had to fulfill your duty while you were working. I had another incident while in the military. I was in a jeep accident where I was flung from the jeep and landed back first on a boulder. I was knocked unconscious, and woke up in a field medical tent. I had three surgeries; two on my neck and one in my lumbar area.

When I came back to the United States, I was stationed at Ft. Bragg, North Carolina. I finished up my Army time, and took my parting physical. They cleared me with a statement that I was physically sound. They never ex-rayed my back or performed a hearing test. I got out of the Military, and still had the tinnitus. I let it go for many years thinking there wasn’t an avenue to receive help from the military. I didn’t know about the compensation program. I just began to seriously seek help about seven years ago, when I was 71 years old. I had severe hearing loss. I had strong tinnitus, and battles with depression, because I couldn’t hear what my grandchildren were saying. That is when a hearing specialist, that was treating me, shared the compensation program from the Military. I had no idea. So, I met with a Veteran’s advocate group. This is the VA advocacy that has representatives who fight for you. They helped me file a disability claim to the Veteran’s Administration. I put down what I did for a MOS (job) and what I did daily in Korea. I also filed a claim for a back injury.

As far as my hearing, I got a form letter back from them saying my hearing loss was due to aging, and I was denied. This happened because I waited for over 50 years to file a claim. The details were cloudy as far as my time in Korea according to the VA. The claim for my back and neck were also denied because they felt, again, that it was due to old age.

You need to start your claim immediately if you are injured or have physical problems of any kind. Do not wait. It is easy to procrastinate like I did, but then you will be facing disappointment and heartache. It is much harder to get a claim passed. What you will need is a written letter from a doctor saying they felt your injury was due the time you were in the military. That is a huge game changer, and should get you the claim you deserve. It may take you a while to find a doctor willing to do this, but they are there and keep looking.

Above all… don’t ever give up! I am still fighting for my rights and you should too.
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Recently, I have found myself having long conversations with civilians about the military. I am a full time student at a private university in Kansas and much of the faculty and student body has never even thought about joining the military. It isn’t anything strange; this is to be expected at such a small school and the fact that the military makes up less than 1% of the population of the country. What is interesting is that many of them have only the movies to go off of when forming their view of what everyone does in the military. Sadly, making movies about productive supply sergeants and personnel clerks doesn’t really make people line up outside of the theaters. Many civilians, in my experience, have this idea in their head that every single member of the military is out on the battlefield, kicking in doors and getting shot at or blown up. Those of us who have spent any amount of time in the military knows that this is far from the reality of the military. Perhaps this is where recruiting takes the biggest hit.

I spoke to a professor of mine who is going through a point in her life where she is trying to make a transition from her current position to a new one. As she was looking through openings at different universities across the country to put in a packet for the position, I made a joke about how she should just go and commission in the Air Force or something. Don’t get me wrong, I loved being in the Army, but I also know the kind of people that would be able to be successful in the Army and she is far more suited for the Air Force. She actually took the comment seriously. The money as an officer is more than she is making now. The opportunity for advancement is obviously there. The only real concern that she had was that she didn’t want to find herself in Iraq or Afghanistan in a year, getting shot at and blown up. I couldn’t help but to laugh.

I began to explain how the military is made up of many occupations that have almost nothing to do with direct combat. This was new information for her. As I began to name off occupations like public affairs, logistics, intelligence, and clerical her eyes went wide. I tried to break it down in the easiest way that I could by telling her that you can think of the military as a microcosm for the country. We know that the military makes up less than 1% of the population in the United States and in almost an exact, similar fashion, those who work as combat arms occupations (such as infantry, tankers, and cavalry) make up about 1% of the military. I went on to break down the military into the three categories that we all know and love: combat, combat-support, and support. I finished up by explaining that, if she chose a certain occupation, the chances of her being involved in direct combat were slim to none. I will follow that statement up by saying that I did tell her that there is always the possibility and that there are still non-combat service members that are injured or killed in combat.

This entire conversation made me wonder if this woman’s view of the military, where everyone is running around with fully automatic rifles, night vision goggles, going in under the cover of night and wrecking shop, is really what the rest of the country thinks is all that is done. They don’t know what goes on behind the scenes; they don’t know what goes into conducting a single mission long before the first HMMWV rolls out of the FOB. After this thought, I began to wonder if this is why many people don’t give military service a single thought.

Next, I wondered if this same idea is why we have so many guys, or gals, who leave the military honorably after serving in a support role and decide to go out and say that they were Delta Force Seal Special Ranger Snipers or whatever the kids are saying these days. Are all of the recent military movies that glorify only that small percentage to blame for these issues? When we really begin to think about it, if combat arms is such a small population within our military, just how small is the population that works as a member of these special groups? It is tiny.

I do not know what the remedy for this issue is. I do not think that there should be a ban on military movies glorifying heroism and bravery under fire, even if I do find that many of the movies are awful. What is there that can be done though? Is there any way that we can properly educate citizens on what makes up the military? How can we also get it through the minds of our people that get out after serving that there is no need to act like something that you were not?

The military takes all kinds. It is a giant machine that requires numerous moving parts. If one part fails, every cog in the machine grinds to a halt or, at a minimum, does not function nearly as well as it needs to.
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*First Edit*
There seems to be some misunderstanding: the nature of my question isn't about disrespecting or defying the POTUS, it's about when service members berate, insult or lash out at civilians, friends, peers or family members on social media or otherwise, simply because they voted for the opposite candidate.

*Second Edit*
Also, to clarify, I believe the behavior in question is wrong. I think some folks interpreted my question as asking for justification to be a jerk, but that couldn't be further from the case. I just wanted to generate discussion about people's opinions regarding whether being aggressive or hateful towards voters because of their choice was just being a crappy person, or a legitimate punitive breach of military bearing and discipline.


When President Obama won, there was a deluge of complaints, the birther movement, a different brand of "Not my president." Now that President Trump has won office, there's similar sentiment. On either side, there is a lot of aggression being thrown around. Do you feel Service Members have a higher responsibility to be respectful of the American voters, regardless of their choice?

Respect of the POTUS is a given, we're expected, as service members, to render that. My question is more in line with respecting the fellow Americans that voted; it seems antithetical to me to be aggressive and hurtful to fellow Americans, especially those that have dissenting opinions from ours, for exercising one of the fundamental rights we swore to uphold and defend.
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Had an interesting moment where in a soldier had me direct dial his BN CMD while correcting him about him wearing black lipstick, earrings, finger jewlery and ripped pants.

The CMD informed me I needed to read the regulations, which I have done so.

As far as I've read and know, there has been no update that allows male soldiers to wear this off-duty while on post.
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All in fun 2LT's. We've all been new somewhere at sometime.
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