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Bea59a0
The latest tragedy of gun violence against the LGBTQ community is just a continuance of the attack in the SC church, the campus shootings, Navy Yard assault, Theater attack, and assaults upon our children at schools. Assault weapons are the issue, not "guns." How do we fix this?
861 people commented on this discussion.
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If the man at the top may be unstable - then the White House is likely to exhibit some instability - as well as some efforts by the White House staff - who are normal infighters - to undermine and replace the man at the top. The problem, however, is how to accomplish regime change (the replacement of a mentally unstable incumbent with another member of the ruling political party) within the very strict confines of the United States Constitution - and within the constraint of maintaining the full faith and confidence of the citizens. Time to bring Mike Pence up to bat.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/donald-trump-mental-health-new-york-times-incapable-being-president-warning-open-letter-a7578831.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/13/opinion/mental-health-professionals-warn-about-trump.html

http://www.lancedodes.com/new-york-times-letter
159 people commented on this discussion.
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Talked to a recruiter today about going back into active duty and he told me they would have to do a rank determination on me and there's a possibility I may have to be reduced one rank to E5. Has anyone or would anyone take a reduction in rank to back into active duty? Would it be a smart move? I'm looking for opinions and advice from people have done it or considering it.
39 people commented on this discussion.
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Ed6424b7
We've all got one - that moment in your civilian job when the CPO came out of ya, or the LPO came out...maybe even the CO or XO rose it's head. What's yours? When did your military bearing come to play?
27 people commented on this discussion.
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Had an interesting moment where in a soldier had me direct dial his BN CMD while correcting him about him wearing black lipstick, earrings, finger jewlery and ripped pants.

The CMD informed me I needed to read the regulations, which I have done so.

As far as I've read and know, there has been no update that allows male soldiers to wear this off-duty while on post.
28 people commented on this discussion.
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I had a debate today about the hypothetical that if the President of the United States broke a law on a Military Base, would the MPs be able to touch him and have jurisdiction over him? Of course I said yes, due to him being on a Military installation. But quite a few said no, because his secret service wouldn't allow it? Curious if anyone knows any actual facts to something like this happening?
26 people commented on this discussion.
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5fca438d
I have always been curious about this and can't find anything about why.
Posted in these groups: Rank RankEnlisted_logo Enlisted4276e14c Uniforms
23 people commented on this discussion.
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A4346dd6
Any job big or small that created doubt about whether to stay in the military.
Posted in these groups: Tumblr_static_tumblr_mtb09amgp11s0247uo1_1280 Military Life
128 people commented on this discussion.
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8e5f8ddc
I had a newer Private in my unit pose this question to me at my last drill weekend. In context, this Private was walking outside the Company area and saluted a cadet who did not return the salute. I have minimal experience dealing with Cadets, and informed him that I would get a proper answer for him. To my understanding they can be saluted as a sign of respect, but it isn't required yet.
27 people commented on this discussion.
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A2bd5b55
*RP Staff Will Be Monitoring This Discussion*

From RP Staff: Brig. Gen. (Ret.) Carol Eggert completed a 30-year military career in 2014, with service in the active duty U.S. Army, as well as the Army Reserve and Army National Guard in Pennsylvania.

She now leads an eight-person team as the Senior Vice President of Military and Veteran Affairs at Comcast NBCUniversal headquarters in Philadelphia. The team provides strategic leadership to all aspects of Comcast NBCUniversal’s programs and outreach to the military and veteran community, including hiring, community investment, business development.

With Comcast NBCUniversal’s commitment to hire 10,000 veterans, National Guard and Reserve members, and military spouses by the end of 2017, Carol will talk about how valuable the military community talent pool is to America’s employers.

Carol completed her distinguished military career in 2014 as the Assistant Adjutant General for the Pennsylvania National Guard and the Deputy Commandant for the Army War College. She served in a variety of command and staff positions and completed numerous overseas deployments, including a 15-month combat tour in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom as Chief of the Women’s Initiatives Division and Senior Liaison to the U.S. Embassy, Baghdad, and received numerous military awards and commendations, including the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star, and Purple Heart.

Her leadership in the private sector has been recognized by HillVets, who placed her on their 2016 list of the 100 most influential veterans in America, and by the Philadelphia Business Journal, who named her one of their 2016 Veterans of Influence.
21 people commented on this discussion.
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C1beddb8
It seems to me that officers are recogized far more often then enlisted soldiers. I mean an officer and junior enlisted could do the same exact thing, or an enlisted could do more then an officer and chances are the officer will be given a higher award. Why? I have been in for almost 8 years and only have 1 AAM which is my only actual award.
42 people commented on this discussion.
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They're impossible to escape: those words or sayings that you would never hear outside of the military, were once cool or at least tolerable, but now you just can't stand them. Whether it be slang, a saying, an insult, or a cadence, most everyone has one that just makes them cringe. What are yours??? Also, if you know the origins of others' annoying words or phrases, please reply to their comments!

I have three in particular:

1) 100-Mile-an-Hour Tape (You mean duct tape?...)

2) Hardball Road (I don't know if you're referring to that paved road over there or just a confrontational course of action)

3) "More messed up than a soup sandwich" (It was funny the first time I heard it, novel the second time, and annoying every time after)
220 people commented on this discussion.
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Screen_shot_2015-01-16_at_3.08.21_pm
With how busy so many Service Members are due to their military duties, it’s sometimes tough to ensure that our spouses are fully up to speed on rules and regulations that may be relevant to them, or to the time we spend together on the installation. Below, we list 7 of the most common “in-uniform rules” spouses should know.

Which ones would you change, and why? What else would you add to this list?

//

1. PDA is typically prohibited, except for certain special situations.
Military regulations take public displays of affection (PDA) more seriously than many spouses realize, due to high standards for professionalism. Special situations like a return from a deployment MIGHT be acceptable circumstances for a quick “welcome home” kiss, depending on your chain of command.

2. My right hand is empty for a reason!
While in uniform, Service Members are typically expected to keep their right hand empty while in conditions that would require a salute, which is done with the right hand only. This may seem obvious to SMs, but many spouses do not know this!

3. I can’t talk on my cell phone while walking.
Talking on your cell phone while walking in uniform on base is one of the easiest ways to get jacked up as of late. It’s like putting a target on your chest. We’ve heard countless stories of Service Members witnessing a Senior NCO sprinting across the street to make this correction! Epic.

4. Why I say “no” when you offer me a piece of gum.
Many military units prohibit chewing gum while in uniform, especially while stateside. We’ve heard reports that this may vary depending on the military branch or command policy of the SM, including the degree to which it’s enforced. But just in case, it’s important to know this!

5. I can’t use an umbrella when it’s raining. Seriously.
Uniformed SMs typically cannot utilize an umbrella when it’s raining outside. They have wet weather gear for that, even though that gear still allows them to get soaked most of the time. We’ve heard reports that some female SMs may be allowed to use an umbrella under certain circumstances, and we also can’t confirm how strictly a SM’s chain of command enforces this. But beware that SMs using umbrellas is as squared away as a football bat.

6. Wearing my uniform items could get me jacked up, or worse.
This is a sensitive topic for some SMs, but there have been countless situations where a spouse wears the SM’s uniform items in inappropriate ways and is perceived as casting the military profession in a negative light. Enforcement of this policy also depends on the SM’s chain of command or installation policy, but PLEASE be thoughtful and considerate if you ever decide to put on your SM’s uniform items while outside of the home environment.

7. I still need to salute and greet while we’re together.
This aspect of the military profession occasionally irritates spouses, but when a SM is uniformed and on the installation he is still required to greet and salute IAW regulations, even if the two of you are enjoying a nice private walk together. This issue occasionally catches “new” military spouses off guard – meaning those who are new to the military culture, perhaps due to recent marriage or their SM recently joining the military.

//

Which of these would you change, and why? What else would you add to this list?
Posted in these groups: Rules_logo RulesSpouses_logo SpousesRules_and_regulations Regulation
272 people commented on this discussion.
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705e434c
Share your experience and how you cope. What you share could help other find better ways to manage their health.
16 people commented on this discussion.
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3177428/Latin-Kings-gang-member-28-accused-stabbing-death-17-year-old-transgender-girl-burying-backyard.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0uuAnulDHY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtwBgm8HEpM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oK2ECuNt6kM

'All across the country, right now, all across the world, at this very moment, there are young people coming to terms with being transgender. They’re learning that they’re different and they are trying to figure out how to handle that, on top of every other problem young people have.

'They’re getting bullied, they’re getting raped, they're getting beaten up, they’re getting murdered and they’re committing suicide. The numbers are staggering, but they are the reality of what it is like to be trans today.

'Just last month, the body of 17-year-old Mercedes Williamson, a transgendered young woman of color, was found in a field in Mississippi stabbed to death . . . and buried in her murder's back yard.

'Are we mature enough, do we care enough, can we stop the violence?
130 people commented on this discussion.
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I know it's a stretch, but hear me out. I have recently completed my respective MES for my level. The Senior leadership were WAY out of touch with the reality of today's green suitor. I refused to ask them any technical questions as they had no idea of what I was asking. So, I stuck with administrative questions. Is it feasible to ask those charged with creating a POI to go research it themselves?
9 people commented on this discussion.
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Head_shaving
So I was in basic training land today to help with some medical stuff. I couldn't help but noticed all the shaved heads all over the place and then the females with 20 ft of hair. In an era where we are screaming equal treatment; is this equal?I am also wondering why does a new private have to get his head shaved in the first place? Why not just a haircut within Army Standards?

Have the lines between male and female been erased?  Are they trying to be erased or are we picking and choosing which ones we want to erase? Why does a male soldier have no choice in keeping his hair but a female does? If you love Liberty you will vote below.

ADDED: Could this be considered a form of hazing with the crackdown on hazing since this is obviously not a requirement but more of a tradition? I'm not saying I think it is I'm just asking the question. If it's not required and it doesn't apply to everyone.

*****UPDATED******
Well, well, well what do we have here?
http://www.navytimes.com/story/military/careers/2015/01/08/rtc-boot-camp-haircuts-navy/21439483/
138 people commented on this discussion.
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Osr_medal
I deployed to Afghanistan in 2012 with Temporary Change of Station (TCS) orders that said my tour would be no longer than 270 days (about 9 months). My tour ended up being 8 months and 1 day, as my unit redeployed a few weeks early. The unit I deployed with awarded me the Overseas Service Ribbon (OSR) for having completed a tour. I arrived at my current unit a few months ago, and prior to my recent appearance at the promotion board, S1 reviewed my records and removed the OSR from my ERB, stating that I didn't serve overseas long enough to qualify for the OSR. My Platoon Sergeant is the one who made me aware of S1's decision to remove my OSR, and he hasn't disagreed with S1's decision or made any moves to investigate the situation, so I did the research on my own.

AR 600-8-22 says that the OSR is awarded to Soldiers who are credited with a normal overseas tour completion according to AR 614-30. AR 614-30 says that a Soldier has completed a tour if he serves to within 60 days of the prescribed tour. I was deployed to within 21 days of my prescribed tour, and my early return wasn't under my control or by my request; my whole unit redeployed a few weeks early. According to my research, I should be able to keep my OSR.

I'm going to print my TCS deployment orders and take them to S1 to show that my prescribed tour was only 9 months, but beyond that, I haven't decided what to do. Has anyone else been in this situation, or can anyone explain where I went wrong in my evaluation? What would you do in my situation?
58 people commented on this discussion.
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