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This Soldier was asked by two NCOs to fix his pants. The Soldier claimed to not be a Soldier, but he was at a military clothing looking to purchase the new PTs. He was very disrespectful and not receptive of the orders. What else would you suggest if he refuses to give his command's or his personal information?
Posted in these groups: Discipline1 Discipline454274742x356 DA Pam 670-1
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Recently the President said that he wanted to raise the age for the purchase of firearms from 18 to 21, meaning long guns.
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New here, sorry if formatting or any rules are broken.
I am ready to submit my 153A packet on deadline 18may18 for the July board. I am still waiting on my Battalion Commanders Lettie and he wants to introduce me to the SWO on bliss as they are good friends.
Question is here to help my anxiety. I have a 58 SIFT score and 115 GT on the AFCT (:/)the physical is all well (H2 hearing waiver has been approved by the flight surgeons at Rucker) and rest of paperwork is done to include DA photo. I am an 11B E5 sergeant and my resumes includes my CIB, EIB, commandants list from BLC and a prior soldier of the month. finally, I will have 34 credits from AMU after this physics class ends next week. Does this packet sound strong?
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I am going to make this blunt..... I am NOT looking for argument on old army vs new army and butt hurt reports and bull. I get it back in such and such day if someone didn't fit in they just ate some nails, rubbed dirt in it and moved on not caring cause robots ruled!

It's not healthy regardless of what people say think or feel it isn't healthy to be a lone wolf. Ironically lone wolves die and since we are suppose to be a army of one and never leave a fallen comrade that is what I am looking at. This is NOT me I have seen this be an issue as a lower enlisted and took steps to try and help. Now that I am moving into a NCO position I'd really like to hear from other fellow leaders of how they have handled those who are having a hard time adapting to military life in a new unit.

I'd also love to hear how you helped other leaders do better by there peers in encouraging them to help there soldiers. I'm mean it's in the NCO Creed that we are to care for our fellow soldiers but some just don't uphold that so advice in this area is welcome!
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Again(yes I know I am posting a lot lately but being in school I am seeing things and curious on how to better handle via peers actual experience) I am not looking for a debate on whether females should be in combat roles. That isn't what this post is about or the advice I am looking for. What I am looking for is assimilating females into training when it comes to combat OPS. I've notice that the vast majority of the time here when it comes to desk, medical, etc jobs, where females have commonly been present, that females are more then ready to integrate with the males and it isn't hard to see a mix of male and female groups. Pretty easy and straight forward they call for 5 man groups and it is a fast and easy mix.... but now that we are moving into combat ops it is very much a game of "get with the guys"... leaving anyone who isn't male on the outside going....."darn we need to learn this too how about we mix this up so you can now teach us".

This morning that was the issue 4 leaders were picked, one was a "POG" and when they split teams those with experience ran to there buddies and everyone without experience or any real idea of how to do movements, SALUTE, etc was left in a single team of "oh crap". (They ran a lane prior to covering any of the class's so we had not had a chance to learn much and for most of us it's been 5-10years since we touched any of this) ClusterF was an understatement.

Of course 3 teams were pretty damn decent and did a good run through and the final time..... it was bad.

How do we prevent shit like this for happening? How do we better the mindset of "HELP YOUR FELLOW SOLDIER" and get rid of the idea that only X people need to survive. Because speaking bluntly the mindset this morning tells me if we were all in the field ALL of these others would have left the final team to die.
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Hiw would one go about applying to the Military Prep school as a current soldier? How likely is it to get accepted into this program, ie what does it take to get in?
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For me I am most proud to wear the American Flag!
Posted in these groups: Us-medals AwardsHqdefault BadgesRibbons-banner2 Medals
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Command Post What is this?
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The US Army Values are Loyalty, Duty, Respect, Selfless Service, Honor, Integrity and Personal Courage.
Former Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl apparently forgot these when, on June 30, 2009, he deserted his unit in Afghanistan, where he wanted to, in his words, “make the world a better place.” Former SGT Bergdahl also forgot that he was wearing the uniform of the United States Army, and that armies fight wars. He signed up. No one forced him into service, and no one forced him to continue service if at any point he decided he had had enough.

In the Army there are legitimate avenues of redress of grievances, and now more than ever before. Your chain of command, the Chaplain, a JAG (Judge Advocate General) officer, or even the highest commander above where you think your problem lies. SGT Bergdahl had whipped himself into an almost psychotic state of isolation, from his unit, from his battle-buddies and even from himself. In the end, the enemy seemed more desirable than the mess he had made in his foxhole.

The sentencing of SGT (now PV-1) Bergdahl is now complete. Instead of a 14 year sentence, sought by the prosecution, a sentence of time served, a reduction in rank, forfeiture of pay and a dishonorable discharge will have to do.

Although Bergdahl had plead guilty to desertion and misconduct before the enemy, the circumstances under which SGT Bergdahl was released, the trade of five Taliban leaders notwithstanding, has its own implications of treason. Some have said that Bergdahl has suffered enough, including his defense team. Some say he is not fit to live, let alone wear the uniform. Several witnesses have testified about their war injuries and losses they claim happened because of Bergdahl’s desertion. There were rumors but no evidence that SGT Bergdahl had given the enemy critical information about the unit, its operations and Standard Operating Procedures (SOP). This would allow the enemy to anticipate the unit’s movements and tendencies, potentially deadly information. Some say, while searching for SGT Bergdahl, they were hit and men died. One man, a former Navy SEAL, claimed tearfully that his service dog was killed on one such mission, and others suffered crippling and career ending injuries. All of this was supposedly taken into consideration before the sentence was handed down by the military judge, Col. Jeffery Nance.

In my opinion, all this testimony is over-engineering. It’s all good, but shouldn’t be necessary to complete the project. Bergdahl deserted in a time of war. How do you maintain good order and discipline if you allow folks to just walk away? There is no claim of insanity. There is no plea bargain. There is no excuse. The punishment for desertion can be death.The reason for this goes back to the beginning of human conflict. If you run in the face of the enemy, you have abdicated your responsibility as a member of the group to help keep the group safe.
In our own Revolutionary War and subsequent conflicts, such as the Civil War, it wasn’t so much power and punch that won the day as it was which side would run first. Name a war or conflict, and what wins the day more times than not is the will to win or survive. Fight or flight. This is why the American Army is so effective; we are trained that in war the mission comes first. We are trained to never leave a soldier behind. We are trained to be good teammates. We are trained to care for each other, help each other and protect each other. And in the foxhole, when the bullets are flying, it’s about you and your battle-buddy, fighting for your lives.The bigger picture is that you are defending the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic, part of the oath of enlistment that Bergdahl breached. But if you allow soldiers to run and then suffer inadequate consequences, what are you telling everyone else who swore that same oath? What then does it mean? In our politically correct, social media, “If it feels good, do it” society, oaths and promises seem blasé and passé. In fact, they are our lifeblood. If we let one instance of obvious and blatant desertion slip through the cracks, what then do we do with the next one, or the next? Kneeling for the national anthem and the absence of even one American flag on the opening night of a national political convention are not simply warning signs, they are signs of the apocalypse that feed the idea that Bergdahl did nothing wrong. That he is innocent of desertion because he was oppressed and that somehow his actions were free speech. It’s not about any of that. It’s about loyalty. The number one most important Army value, and value in life. The acronym constructed out of the Army Values is LDRSHIP (Leadership). The Army aspires to train every soldier to be a leader. In the American Army, even E-Private Zero, Snuffy Smith is expected to carry out the mission if all the leaders above him are incapacitated, in the spirit of Audie Murphy. Murphy, the highly decorated farm boy turned hero from WWII who was battlefield promoted from sergeant to second lieutenant and saved many lives with his heroism, over, and over again, all at 5’4” and 112 pounds, carried on with the mission, time and again. We owe it to the memory of all those who gave their lives in defense of this great nation. We owe it to those who were injured and may have died while searching for Bowe Bergdahl, and we owe it to the future of this nation that Bowe Bergdahl’s punishment fit the crime. But the punishment in this case has not fit the crime in any way, shape or form. The echo from this proceeding will carry far and wide, that the perceived suffering of one man, a deserter, held more weight than the entire history of the military of the greatest nation on earth.
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I bring up this question because my wife was treated very poorly by another spouse because of my rank! Here husband is a Major in the Marines and she has told others that is the reason she doesn't like my wife.

Why play the "Rank Card?" RP Members your thoughts?

Why is this still happening in our veteran and retirement community? I've always addressed service members here on RP by their rank initially out of respect for what they have accomplished and then I drop it and start addressing them by their first name as much as possible. Accordingly, RP allows you to highlight the name of another member, so your RP Connections will receive an email and the rank is required - got it!

I think once we leave the service there shouldn't be a stereotyping of rank or service - we should get along and respect each other as veterans and retirees that served a "common purpose!" Again, this just my opinion!

By thw way my wife has never played the "rank card" and never will!
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Some officers are meant to command and lead, and others probably should never be allowed the opportunity. I'm a witness to the case of an ousted ex-commander now working as a staff-O "leading" a highly technical department - his lack of technical competence and inability to mentor and lead others is obvious. Should such an officer be "encouraged" to separate or retire early to make room?
Posted in these groups: 200210106b CommandGeneral_of_the_army_rank_insignia OfficerDod_color DoD
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There are some things we do in the military that was deemed appropriate for the time it was created or existed, but by today's technology and standard of living and expectations may seem overkill or unnecessary. I think its time that the military evolved itself into adulthood and get rid of some things. Formations are one.

(Let me clarify - not all formations are set to disseminate information. Face-to-face can be done out of formation [if you're not stuck behind your desk], and accountability is typically done before a formation - if someone is missing, you either will call them, knock on doors, or go to their house. There are circumstantial units that exist where formations don't happen; deployments are typically one of them. Most units don't do D&C or Manual of Arms these days. So what are we really doing in a non-event i.e. promotions, awards, or ceremonies that can't be done outside of a formation?)
Posted in these groups: Tradition-crest TraditionF3af5240 Military History
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I am planning on wearing my uniform to an appropriate event but have since grown a beard. I have looked for he answer in AR670-1 and 10 USC 772 but can not find the answer any help would be greatly appreciated.
Posted in these groups: 4276e14c UniformsAfp_getty-511269685 Dress Uniform
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Command Post What is this?
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*The views expressed in RallyPoint Command Posts are those of the authors’ and are not endorsed by RallyPoint*

This whole gun debate is getting out of hand. We’re focusing on all the wrong things in my opinion. So, I did some thinking and came up with a tried and true way of bringing school shootings to zero. Or close to it.

Most of the arguments I hear about how to stop school shootings are focused on the shooter. That’s our first problem. It’s an impossible task to try to stop the next shooter when they’re all different, have different motives, and different resources. The other arguments focus on the weapons. AR-15’s bear the brunt of this. What makes this weapon so bad? Magazine capacity? Ok. So, will forcing the shooter to reload more save lives? Maybe, maybe not. Most everyone I know with an AR-15 shoots FMJ rounds like we use in the military. If I had to choose between my child getting shot with a green tipped 5.56 round or a 30.06 Core-Lokt round, I’ll pick the AR-15 round 6 days a week and twice on Sunday. So, let’s be careful before we force these murderers to choose a 30.06. Just food for thought.

So, if focusing on the shooter and focusing on the weapon won’t work, what will? We need to focus on the school. Bear with me as I walk through this.
I was a Marine Security Guard at the American Embassy in Bogota, Colombia and Harare, Zimbabwe. Despite what you see in movies, the MSG’s job is to protect the people and information INSIDE the embassy. Much like what needs to be done at a school. What happens outside was of little concern. We literally never talked about the threats to the embassy unless they were an actual force like the FARC in Colombia. There was no point in spending time trying to pinpoint some individual that no one knows who might do something one day. So how did we protect the people and information inside from these unknown threats? I’ll use the embassy in Colombia for this analysis since it was much more fortified. First, we start with the building to be protected being placed far away from any streets. How far? Far enough that if a car blew up on the street nothing would happen to the building. Next, we have a wall (not a fence) surrounding the property to keep people and vehicles from going off-road and getting to the building. The entry point will have armed guards and barriers. Every vehicle and every person is searched at this gate before entering. The armed guard inside has cameras on the entire property. Could someone still scale the wall and sneak onto the property? Sure, but we’ll cover that later.

What if someone shoots the guards outside and heads toward the building you say? Well the building is fortified with bullet proof glass and blast resistant doors. And those doors are locked and controlled by another armed guard inside. This guard also can control the barriers at the outside gate should he need to. (Make a mental note that at this time the guard inside just triggered an alarm and 5-10 other guys that are nearby are suiting up to come help.) Located around the perimeter of the building are CS canisters that the guard inside can deploy as needed. So, the intruder that killed the guards outside and made a run for the front door is now sucking in gas.

What if someone has a gas mask and somehow gets inside the building with a gun? Remember that armed guard inside the building? With the flip of a switch he can magnetically lock all the doors in the building. So now the intruder can only attack those who find themselves outside of the locked down areas. But he better hurry because that armed response team I mentioned earlier is only minutes away. And this team does nothing but train to clear and defend this particular building. They have rehearsed this scenario more times than they can count, and they know every nook and cranny in the building. You can’t hide. Their whole purpose in life is this exact scenario. The intruder will soon be dead.

You can see how much better this is than the current situation schools face where the shooter just walks through the front door and starts shooting. A single police officer may be there in a minute, but it takes some time figuring out what’s going on. He also doesn’t know the layout of the building. Meanwhile other law enforcement arrives and a plan is developed. All of this takes time and during that time people are dying.

But you also see the enormous cost this would entail. It is impossible to do what I’ve described in every school if any. So, what do we do? We start peeling off layers of security. The building won’t be fortified. Maybe we have an armed guard, but he isn’t in a protected position and most likely becomes the first casualty. We might install a metal detector, but it will be inside and useless for someone looking to start shooting. In the military we call this Risk Management. FM 6-0 defines it as the process of identifying, assessing, and controlling risks arising from operational factors and making decisions that balance risk cost with mission benefits. We know at the beginning of an operation people will die. We do what we can to limit that, but we can’t prevent it completely. Every layer of security we peel off from what I’ve described means we assume a little more risk which equates to possible deaths. Is the embassy scenario overkill? Probably. But at what point do you stop adding security measures and accept the risk?

The point of this is to show that A) there is a way to protect our children in school almost completely. And B) the cost to do so would be astronomical. Now we just need to decide how much we’re willing to pay (since our taxes pay for schools). But we must focus on the facility being protected. We don’t focus on unnamed, random threats in the military so why do that here? We also don’t focus on getting rid of something so prevalent as guns. We have entire government agencies focused on getting rid of illegal drugs and they can’t do it. If you think outlawing guns in the US won’t make every arms dealer in the world start drooling, you’re wrong. The influx of illegal weapons into our country would be enormous and immediate. It’s basic economics.

So, we have the plan. And like most other things in life it really comes down to money. How much are you willing to spend and how much risk are you ready to assume?
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Recently at the Florida shooting, we found out that the Broward County Sheriff assigned to the school did not go into the school or try to intervene during the school shooting. Governor Brown of California in 2018 has made it illegal for School faculty having a concealed weapon aside from sworn officers. All I hear on NPR is no no no! PBS NewsHour debated this with NRA students. What do you think?
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What would you do, if a passenger in first class "boo'd" a Gold Star family for being allowed to leave the aircraft first to receive their fallen son/daughter in the military?
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If today you were given the chance to, what changes would you make. At least one change should be in reference to improving some aspect relating to your technical classification and the other either to the branch you service or the military as a whole. Leave a comment, what you would change, why, and what benefit you believe it would bring.
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Some people said it's Sir/Ma'am but some also say that it's Mr and Ms/Mrs
Posted in these groups: 22px-us-army-cw3.svg CW322px-us-army-wo1.svg WO122px-us-army-cw2.svg CW222px-us-army-cw5.svg CW5
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So this CSM from the the 8th MP BDE seems to be out of regulations. From the comments she has been corrected but she claims she is being harassed. I don't even understand how she got to be a CSM at a BDE. What COL out there is letting this happen? In one of the photos she is wearing stilettos in uniform. WTF? What kind of example is this. The worst is from a Facebook user that said:

"This one!!!! Holy **** she was in charge of us in Afghanistan!! I could go on and on about this toxic leader!! Trying to maintain professionalism but this one.....when a CSM so jacked up like this, she was laughing her ass off during our rehearsal of my brothers ceremony after he was killed in Afghanistan, she f***ing yelled at me because I "took too long saying my goodbye " as I'm f***ing crying kneeling in front of it. This post will probably get me in trouble, and ruin the rest of my army career as well as my day and my army experience."

What would you do if you were there? What if you were on command?

What should the Army do about this?

(Thanks to Army MP WTF Moments and it's followers for the photos.)

**************UPDATE************************
The 8th Theater Sustainment Command CSM will be travelling to the 8th MP BDE to have some one on one time with this CSM. It is amazing as leaders will do when they are being called out. He should have done that a long time ago.
Posted in these groups: Army-usa-or-09b.svg CSM583px-ambrose_burnside21 Grooming Standards
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It has been 50 years since race relations training has been incorporated as mandatory training in the military. During the 70s all military were required to attend race relations training and this included general officers and admirals.
The training was directed at the Caucasian heterosexual and the majority of instructors were black NCOs. I can remember sitting for hours in race relations classes where all the black soldiers were grouped together, by choice, and watched as the Caucasian soldiers were targeted by the instructors. If a soldier was removed from a race relations class for any reason, he was in trouble. In the combat arms line units, racism from ALL groups was very bad. There were KKK Klaverens and Black Panther Chapters active in units fighting over the drug trade. One out of three company commanders were being relieved in Germany. Our once STRAC, show boat army in Europe had turned into a cesspool. (If anyone is interested in how bad it had become, I wrote a novel—that was based on a 500-page IG Report titled RABBIT HUNT. It can be found as a E-book at amazon or as a trade paperback at barnesandnoble.com)
One of the major problems was the recruiting “Buddy Program” where men could join as groups and be guaranteed to remain together until they reached their first unit. This dumped intact gangs in line units.
Diversity training also created huge problems, especially the large influx of women who demanded they be billeted in the same unit barracks they were assigned. All military barracks had been designed for a single sex with open latrines. The army responded to those problems by hiring civilian guards and kitchen workers, lowering PT testing standards, building college style dorms and giving the female soldiers special privileges the males did not have.
In 50 years the military has come a long way. There are now four-star female and minority group generals and admirals. The military is completely integrated. It is time to do away with all race relations programs and diversity training.
The military needs to operate on a single principle: Equality under the law and achievement based on one’s ability. There should be one test for everyone that is the same and the top scorers get the prize.
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