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I bring up this question because my wife was treated very poorly by another spouse because of my rank! Here husband is a Major in the Marines and she has told others that is the reason she doesn't like my wife.

Why play the "Rank Card?" RP Members your thoughts?

Why is this still happening in our veteran and retirement community? I've always addressed service members here on RP by their rank initially out of respect for what they have accomplished and then I drop it and start addressing them by their first name as much as possible. Accordingly, RP allows you to highlight the name of another member, so your RP Connections will receive an email and the rank is required - got it!

I think once we leave the service there shouldn't be a stereotyping of rank or service - we should get along and respect each other as veterans and retirees that served a "common purpose!" Again, this just my opinion!

By thw way my wife has never played the "rank card" and never will!
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Posted in these groups: Hqdefault Boot CampStar Promotions
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*First Edit*
There seems to be some misunderstanding: the nature of my question isn't about disrespecting or defying the POTUS, it's about when service members berate, insult or lash out at civilians, friends, peers or family members on social media or otherwise, simply because they voted for the opposite candidate.

*Second Edit*
Also, to clarify, I believe the behavior in question is wrong. I think some folks interpreted my question as asking for justification to be a jerk, but that couldn't be further from the case. I just wanted to generate discussion about people's opinions regarding whether being aggressive or hateful towards voters because of their choice was just being a crappy person, or a legitimate punitive breach of military bearing and discipline.


When President Obama won, there was a deluge of complaints, the birther movement, a different brand of "Not my president." Now that President Trump has won office, there's similar sentiment. On either side, there is a lot of aggression being thrown around. Do you feel Service Members have a higher responsibility to be respectful of the American voters, regardless of their choice?

Respect of the POTUS is a given, we're expected, as service members, to render that. My question is more in line with respecting the fellow Americans that voted; it seems antithetical to me to be aggressive and hurtful to fellow Americans, especially those that have dissenting opinions from ours, for exercising one of the fundamental rights we swore to uphold and defend.
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I was told the other day my 5TH grade daughter did here first ESAY and it was on Veterans Day and this what she wrote.

Veterans Day

Do you know why Veterans Day is a holiday? Veterans Day is a holiday because we celebrate the people who sacrifice for our country and the purpose of Veterans Day. The people who served did a big deed for us. My Dad served for 20 years. Veterans Day is on November 11. Let me explain the history of this important day.
Veterans Day is formerly known as Armistice Day but since 1938 it has been called Veterans Day. the first Armistice Day was on November 11 1919 because of Woodrow Wilson. This holiday honored World War I Veterans. In 1938 they changed the word ''Armistice'' to "Veterans" to honor veterans of all wars. In 1975 President Ford officially made the date to celebrate this national holiday. Our veterans are honored for making sacrifices.
Many veterans have made sacrifices. Some are injured very badly and some have died. My dad joined the Army when he was 18 years old. He fought in several tours of duty, often putting his life at risk. He spent time away from his family, and had to see some unpleasant things. He now suffers from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder because of the wars that he has gone through.
I am thankful for all of those who have served including my dad. It is important to remember why we celebrate Veterans Day and the individuals it honors. Veterans Day is very special to me because of my dad. Veterans make sacrifices so we can live in a country with freedom. I am proud of my dad and proud to be an American.
Posted in these groups: Vets Veterans Day360511c5 American Flag
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A few years ago…OK, a few DECADES ago, I was a young E-3. I was stationed at U-Tapao AB, Thailand. The title of this article was uttered by my E-8 shop chief. Don’t let the title fool you. I hope to impart some good advice and hope you find it useful if not interesting. Now being a former G.I. I will admit to having a mouth and am known to cuss like the proverbial one-armed sailor – with no disrespect intended to one-armed sailors. I’ll do my best to keep it clean.

It’s no secret that today’s military is nothing like it was in my day 45 years ago. Oh, there are still a lot of things that will never change, however, getting up at Oh-dark hundred will always be one of them. In all seriousness, things are very different now.

Some of the things that need to be contended with then were often overlooked and left to “work themselves out” as opposed to today where much has been refined. In my day, if you were married and got orders the first thing you did was see if it was accompanied or not (if you were married). Was it a remote or isolated tour, how long, etc? When I was on active duty during the Vietnam War I had 7 PCS assignments in 7 years. Today’s military is faced with what seems to be endless deployments.

Today’s MILFORCE is tired. Pure and simple, it is worn to the bone. We have been engaged in Iraq / Afghanistan nearly as long as we were in Vietnam. One of the biggest things I see is the need for fresh blood (metaphorically, that is). We cannot continue to continually send our war fighters into harm’s way over and over and over again without repercussions. As a PTSD patient I know from where I speak.

During Vietnam a tour was a year to 13 months with a break around halfway for R&R. If you were lucky, you got home and did not get orders back. Some of us volunteered to go back and some like me got back to back tours in SEA. I went from working on B-52s in Thailand to working C-141 and C-5s in Vietnam the next year. I know how much of a toll it took on me and can only imagine the toll it is taking on today’s force. With many of our best having deployed three, four and even five times, it is unfathomable how long these brave warriors can continue before they become permanently broken.

As each day passes, I know we all hope the conflicts facing our nation will come to an end. When that time comes we need to be sure we are ready to readjust…readjust to CONUS duty, OCONUS duty, transfer to the Reserves or National Guard, Discharge, promotion to PFC (Permanent F*****g Civilian) or to retirement.

Readjustment is not easy. Forty-five years after Vietnam and I still haven’t totally readjusted. The time to get yourself ready is before you head out the gate. In a word, NOW is the time. The DoD has done a good job of helping refine the programs to help you make the change and I urge you to take advantage of those programs. If you take nothing else from this, I want you to know that many of you will suffer from PTSD. That is a fact of war. Even before you separate, retire or move on to another base, do something about your PTSD. To ask for help is not a sign of weakness. It IS a sign of strength…strength to stand up and do what others would not do. At this point we know there is no cure for PTSD but with treatment, counseling if you will, you can live a good life after the military. If you need help, get it. If you can’t find it, let me know and I will help you find it!
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On February 15, 2016, Senator Dean Heller of Nevada introduced S. 2596. This bill would permit veterans who have service-connected, total and permanent disabilities to travel on military aircraft in the same manner and to the same extent as retired members of the armed forces are entitled to such travel.

This bill would afford priority to totally disabled veterans for transportation on schedule
Posted in these groups: Va Veterans Affairs (VA)Afa1541c DAVFreeby_travel_1p3770 Travel
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Did you hear that a Boy asks for donations to give to disabled veterans instead of birthday presents?

Great story and video - check this out!

http://www.aol.com/article/2015/09/23/boy-asks-for-donations-to-give-to-disabled-vets-instead-of-birth/21240230/

BRAZIL, Ind. (Sept. 23, 2015)-- Adam Jay Perkins II, 8, has a birthday request that might be a little different than wishes of other boys his age.
The Van Buren Elementary second grader is asking all of his friends to skip the presents and give a gift to veterans.

"My mom asked me if I wanted to do a charity and I said, 'Yes,'" he said. "She said, 'Do you want to do Disabled American Veterans?' I said, 'Yes, my dad's a veteran.'"
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While standing in line today at Whole Foods to get some chocolate milk (don't judge) I saw a magazine at the check out and the cover had a picture of a fighter jet on it and the title of an article "Going Back to Iraq, Getting it right this time". I stopped and looked at it again and then the thought hit me "What did we get wrong from 2003 - 2011? We set off with a objective to not only look for weapons of mass destruction but to also remove Saddam from power. Well we don't get into the whole WMD thing but the truth remains that we Saddam and his son's are dead. We tried to stage the country for success. We training their leaders and their military however upon the first sight of trouble, the same guys we trained threw down their weapons, ripped off their uniforms and left their posts.

Now the ISIS has control of the country and after a weekend when we saw an American beheaded, the country is again looking to the east and yelling for action.

What a lot of people outside the military fail to remember is the reason we left Iraq wasn't because of some person sitting behind a desk at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. We left because the SOFA expired and the country of Iraq said they could handle their business. So we took the training wheels off their bike and let them go. Now, they are on their side looking for help and we are once again being called to clean up a mess.

So what did we get wrong between 2003 - 2011? Is it our fault that the country who said they could handle it failed to do so? Is there anything more we could have done? For those that served in support of OIF how do you feel about going back? Do you see any sort of damage being done to the mental health of the US Warfighter by asking him and her to return to a place where we were told our job was done?
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I personally think we all looked a little more professional wearing a beret although it didn't block the sun from blazing your eyes.
Posted in these groups: Ccredberet BeretVtvr2bwn4 Soldier4276e14c Uniforms
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“I remember it getting dark, even though it was a bright day. I remember the darkness closing in. It’s amazing how clear everything becomes when you think your next breath could be your last.” – SSG Dale Beatty

On November 15, 2004, during his deployment in Iraq, SSG Dale Beatty, U.S. Army National Guard (Ret.), while on a routine clearing mission with U.S. Army engineers, was injured by an IED explosion. Since then, he has suffered through 26 surgeries and the eventual amputation of his left leg.

The Fisher House Foundation, founded and supported by Zachary and Elizabeth Fisher, provides cost-free housing for recovering veterans, Active Duty personnel and their families.

Because of Fisher House, after being discharged as an in-patient, SSG Beatty was able to go to therapy and then come “home” in the evenings; “Not to a hotel,” he said, “But come home to Fisher House.” Without Fisher House, SSG Beatty’s family probably would not have been able to stay by his side while he was receiving treatment.

Because of Fisher House, the family was able to stay together and support each other through the very difficult road to recovery.

Collocated with Veterans Administration medical facilities and on military bases, Fisher House Foundation makes it possible for families to stay together at a time when being apart could be the difference between making or breaking a wounded soldier.

SSG Beatty is a great example of someone who has found healing through support of his family. “Without Fisher House,” explains SSG Beatty, “I don’t know what my prognosis would have been. If I had had to stay alone, in a hotel for a year, who knows what would have happened?”

As the spouse of a wounded warrior, SSG Beatty’s wife Belinda explained that she didn’t know what she would have done had Fisher House not been available. She described the love she felt from Fisher House representatives, and also those family members who were going through some of the same things she was with their military loved one, as being life saving.

“I’ve seen a lot of charities do a lot of different things for the military, only really the Fisher House has that focus on the entire family,” said SSG Beatty.

SSG Beatty is just one of many examples of American Heroes who have paid dearly for their service with great personal sacrifice.

Will Reynolds, a retired captain for the U.S. army was injured in an IED explosion during his deployment in Iraq nearly 12 years ago. His injuries led to 26 surgeries and the eventual amputation of his left leg.

A collegiate athlete who competed in gymnastics at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, Reynolds found comfort in sports during his recovery, particularly running, and competed in several Invictus Games, winning three bronze medals. Last year, his successes led him to becoming the co-captain of the 2016 U.S. Invictus Games team.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has stated that disabled veterans who participate in adaptive sports report benefits such as less stress, reduced dependency on pain and depression medication, fewer secondary medical conditions, higher achievement in education and employment, and more independence.

Competitions like the Invictus Games aid in holistic healing throughout the recovery and rehabilitation process of our soldiers: mentally, emotionally, spiritually, physically and socially.

Invictus means ‘unconquered’. The games seek to embody the fighting spirit of the wounded, injured and sick military service members/veterans and what these tenacious men and women can achieve post injury.

During his rehabilitation, Reynolds spent time in a Fisher House, allowing him to devote his attention to recovery and have his family by his side. Will is a great example of someone who has found healing through sports. Both he and Dale are a testament to the statement that a family’s love is truly the best medicine.

With Fisher House, these brave and patriotic military personnel also received salvation.

Please watch this eight minute video of SSG Beatty’s story: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGn4A9Wr5iM
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Here's the background. You are an experienced Soldier. You walk in to the commissary to see a young 2LT shopping with a headset on. You professionally and politely get the 2LT’s attention and address the deficiency. They blatantly are rude, dismiss your comment, and tell you that those rules do not apply to him as an officer. Whether you are an Officer or Enlisted, how do you react?
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I am currently attending excelsior college and although it seems to be a good school I am not sure I would like to go that route. My major is Business Administration with logistics concentration, with all the class that I have taken up to this point it is really killing my moral with every class. I came across Organizational Leadership at brandman university and that degree seems to be filled with soft skill courses. Im not looking be the next VP but I am looking for a degree that can help me out when I get out and it seems that OL with a supply chain emphasis will be able to help with that. I still have hopes to take up a trade when I get out in 2021 but this degree will help me also to become a better leader.
Any thoughts.
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I have noticed through the years of being in the Air Force (Security Forces member here) that most people in the Air Force are clueless when it comes to M-4/M-16/M-9. This is outrageous! What are they supposed to do if the enemy comes knocking on our door step and everyone needs to fight. I have taught classes on the M-4 with communication airmen and have seen them completely mess up clearing out the weapon, loading it (magazine upside down or rounds the wrong way), and just completely incapable of achieving a zero on target after four rounds of firing. I am a big fan of how the Army and Marines teach that your are always a rifleman first. It almost seems like some of the Airmen don't expect to carry a weapon (ummmm why did you join the military in the first place)? I wish the Air Force would pick up on this to make us a more combat ready force. But, enough of me what are your thoughts?
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Recently, at a military event in Washington D.C., I was struck by a feeling that something just wasn’t right. As the US flag was brought into the indoor event by an incredibly professional flag detail, all the civilian and military personnel rose and stood at the position of attention. Military personnel adjusted to continue facing the flag as the flag detail moved across the room. Then, the national anthem played and all of the military personnel remained at the position of attention while the civilians placed their hand over their heart. As a “Twice the Citizen” soldier, I felt conflicted and I couldn’t help but feel as though I was not paying the proper respect to the symbol of our nation. Shouldn’t I be doing something with my hand and my arm? Everything was in accordance with the military regulations that cover indoor ceremonies but, in my view, that didn’t make it right.

After 37 years of military service in all three components of the US Army (Active, National Guard and Army Reserve), I must admit I have a soft spot for Old Glory (the US flag) and for our national anthem. Some people might say I’m just a patriotic fool in view of all the challenges our nation currently faces. But to that I reply - we are a resilient nation of optimists who will find our way eventually and likely come out stronger than before. I am not convinced that standing at the position of attention, while all eyes are on the military, is the best way of paying our unequivocal respect to the symbol of our nation.

I’m a simple guy who believes in simple, yet powerful, concepts. What if every past and present military member always saluted Old Glory 100% of the time in a show of respect and solidarity - indoors or outdoors, rain or shine, with or without headgear? Past and present military members are bound by their service to our nation and this act of solidarity would further bind us to each other. Imagine never having to remember again which situation or circumstances dictated what to do when Old Glory passes or when the national anthem is played. Today, during a military or civilian parade when the US flag passes, veterans always rise, come to the position of attention, and salute. At a baseball game, when the national anthem is played, people rise to their feet, remove their headgear and place their hands over their hearts. What if all the veterans at the baseball game saluted instead of placing their hands over their hearts? Why not take the same approach, 100% of the time, for all events? I once had a drill sergeant who provided some sound advice when asked how often enlisted personnel should salute officers. That drill sergeant said, “You can’t go wrong if you salute 100% of the time.” So why not take that same, simple approach with Old Glory and our national anthem?

Have you ever asked yourself why military personnel don’t salute the US flag 100% of the time? I’m not sure how we got to where we are today with differences between indoor and outdoor events, and differences with and without headgear. Maybe it’s time to revisit and update those regulations. In this day and age, when military service is more rare than in generations past, isn’t it time for all veterans to band together in support of one another and in support of our country? Who knows the value of that symbol of our nation better than those who have fought to defend it? I think it’s time to salute Old Glory. As veterans, we have earned the right, and we have a solemn obligation to those who made the ultimate sacrifice to salute the symbol of our nation. Imagine being at your next event, and seeing all active duty and veteran military personnel saluting the US flag. How would that feel? I’m confident I would feel a tremendous amount of pride in seeing that solidarity and mutual outpouring of enduring respect for the symbol of our nation.

I believe all military members should start a grassroots effort to salute Old Glory 100% of the time. At my next military or civilian event, I intend to take the lead and salute Old Glory – will you join me?

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This editorial is my personal opinion and does not reflect the views of the US Army Reserve, the US Army or the Department of Defense.
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