Posted on Sep 17, 2015
LCDR Deputy Department Head
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Apparently though discharged in 2001, he thought he was in the Army Reserve. What do you think?

http://www.militarytimes.com/story/military/guard-reserve/2015/09/15/senate-candidate-in-virginia-misstates-military-record/72330710/

RICHMOND, Va. — A Democrat running for the state Senate says he thought he was still in the U.S. Army Reserve, but it turns out he hasn't been in the military since he was discharged in 2001.

Gary McCollum — who was recruited by Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe to run in a closely watched contest that could determine which party controls the Senate — had listed on his website and campaign materials that he was currently a major in the Army Reserve.

The former Army Ranger and current executive at Cox Communications has touted his military service during his campaign against Republican Sen. Frank Wagner. The Virginia Beach district where they are competing has a high concentration of current and former military members.

But on Tuesday, McCollum's campaign issued a statement saying he was "informed that his understanding of his current military classification was not correct." The statement was issued after the Virginian-Pilot newspaper first reported the discrepancy.

The statement said McCollum remains proud of his years of service and will change the information on his website and campaign material.

McCollum was discharged from the Army as a major in September 2001, according to Army spokesman Ray Gall. McCollum's service information shows he served in both the Army and the Army Reserve, and transferred to the inactive Army Reserve in June 1992 until his 2001 discharge. As a member of the inactive Army Reserve, McCollum had no formal duties or regularly scheduled commitments to the Army.

The Republican Party of Virginia called on McCollum to withdraw from the race.

"Falsely claiming to be a major in the Army Reserves is an insult to veterans and automatic disqualification for public office," chairman John Whitbeck said in a statement.
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Responses: 41
SGT Jeremiah B.
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I was never entirely certain when my IRR status ended, but I would never have thought to claim reserve status either. So I guess it's possible but really unlikely.
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SGT Jeremiah B.
SGT Jeremiah B.
6 y
LCDR (Join to see) - 14 years seems a touch excessive unless none of his paperwork has an end date.
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SSG Accountant
SSG (Join to see)
6 y
I've seen and known a soldier that was called up after 18 years from the IRR to go to Iraq.
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COL Vincent Stoneking
COL Vincent Stoneking
6 y
SGT Jeremiah B. - As an Officer, his commission is indef. It remains until MRD or until actively resigned/removed.
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PVT Jesse Young
PVT Jesse Young
6 y
your status as an IRR ends when you get the last official discharge. it usually comes with a diploma sized card that says:
This is to certify that
John Smith Rank USAR
was Honorably Discharged from the
United States Army
on the whatever date blah
blah honest and faithful service
whoever
rank USA
commanding.
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SSG John Erny
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OK, so I am in the retired reserve until age 60. Do I have a unit, No. Do, I have a commander, No. Do I have to pass PT, Rifle qual, or put on the uniform, no. Does my rank mean a hill of beans to anyone on active duty, no. The only way any of that matters if all hell breaks loose and they start calling back anyone with a heart beat. Niether does his from that point of view, now had he done one simple thing and put (Ret.) or (Veteran) after his name he would be good to go. I think the Litmus test would be are you subject to UCMJ if you mess up!

The only thing my rank does do is when I drive on a base and some kid that looks like he should still be in high school says good day SGT as he hands back my retired ID. I was never that young I tell you, Never.
LCDR (Join to see) SGT Jeremiah B. CW4 (Join to see) Sgt Richard Buckner
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PO1 John Elliss
PO1 John Elliss
6 y
None of us were. (Ever)
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COL Vincent Stoneking
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Based on just what is in the article, which is short of specific detail, I find it completely believable. In fact, my belief would be that until such time as he SPECIFICALLY RESIGNED his commission, he would technically remain a member of the IRR. (Officers are Indef, and do not ETS until they hit MRD or actively separate) I would need to know the exact nature of his "discharge" to know if his claim was false. I note that is statement stated that his "understanding of his status" was incorrect, not that he did not still have a commission....

As a member of the IRR, would I claim to be "serving" in the Reserves? No, I would not - it would be misleading. However, it would be technically correct. Which is honestly the best you can expect from a politician.
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1LT William Clardy
1LT William Clardy
6 y
COL Vincent Stoneking, the way I always described being in the IRR to civilians was that my name was on a roster behind a piece of glass labeled "Break in case of a Really Bad War", and that if I got called up it would probably be to lead a platoon of drafted Boy Scouts up some hill.
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MAJ Keira Brennan
MAJ Keira Brennan
6 y
1LT William Clardy - id be careful about that mindset. My entire civil affairs team in oef 7 were irr retreads. Actially, there were a slew of usma grads marking time called up in 06.
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1LT William Clardy
1LT William Clardy
6 y
MAJ Keira Brennan, I actually wouldn't mind getting recalled -- it would almost be worth the pay cut to don the uniform again, even knowing that I would be stuck at 1LT forever.

But I've seen the DoD regulations which require (if I recall correctly) explicit SecDef level approval to recall someone in my status (Honorary Retired) to active duty. Plus I know how colorful my military record is, which is why I was retired in the first place.
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