Posted on Nov 13, 2013
CPL(P) Cyber Threat Intelligence Consultant
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The business driver or motivation for switching from NG to Reserves could be manifold. There is little to no guidance from unit career counsellors ( generally speaking) for planning and executing on transferring from NG to Reserves.

If you have switched from NG to Reserves would you please share your modus operandi.What worked for you.

1. Does one have to go thro the MEPS process while switching from NG > Reserves ? ( medical, ASVAB)
2. Is it convinient from a recruiting process to move from NG to IRR and then IRR to Reserves or go direct NG > Reserves.
3. Are the Guard units supportive of such moves ?



Posted in these groups: Army-national-guard-logo Army National GuardUnited_states_ar_seal.svg Army Reserve
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Responses: 28
LTC Training Officer
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<font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);">I transferred from the Guard to Reserves 3 years ago. &nbsp;Here are a few suggestions I have:</span></font><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);">1. &nbsp;Complete your contract/mandatory commitment to your State. &nbsp;</span></font></div><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;a. &nbsp;To expect them to let you go while still paying off the State's investment isn't realistic. &nbsp;I'm not saying it can't happen but...live up to your commitment and your request will be much better received.</span></font></div><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;b. &nbsp;remember that using tuition assistance and attending certain career development and voluntary attendance schools often requires additional commitment to the State.</span></font></div><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);"><br></span></font></div><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);">2. &nbsp;Typically there are two methods..conditional release and unconditional release:</span></font></div><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; a. &nbsp;Conditional release is when you provide a paragraph and line number of the gaining unit and you transfer without a break in service. &nbsp;It's seamless.</span></font></div><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; b. &nbsp;unconditional release is when the Guard puts you into the IRR which allows the Reserve to pick you up. &nbsp;This can also result in seamless service if they process you within a day or two or you can take a month or two off before starting to drill with the new Unit.</span></font></div><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);"><br></span></font></div><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);">3. &nbsp;Begin by contacting an Army Reserve Career Manager nearby. &nbsp;Google it. &nbsp;In the Reserve there are more units and a high liklihood of finding options closer to home. &nbsp;Depending on your Branch you may find a unit you'd fit right into or maybe one with Branch immaterial slots. &nbsp;Ultimately though, you may need to reclass/rebranch in order to maximize your career development and promotion potential. &nbsp;If you're willing to re-branch/re-class immediately then obviously your options increase substantially.</span></font></div><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);"><br></span></font></div><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);">4. &nbsp;Once you have talked to the Reserve career manager and you have a plan of action, communicate your wishes to your Guard unit and have good reasons for making the move. &nbsp;Generally, promotion opportunities are better in the Reserve and if you're in a dead end Guard job or situation where several qualified people are waiting for just a couple potential openings, the Reserve is a good option. &nbsp;I also think its a great reason to ask for the transfer, but be tactful and gracious as appropriate...don't burn bridges before you cross them.</span></font></div><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);"><br></span></font></div><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);">5. &nbsp;There are a slew of memos, counseling statements etc. that your State will require to get the ball rolling. &nbsp;Ask the Reserve career manager for advice and any info they have on the process in your State, then contact an experienced full timer in your S-1/ personnel section and find out exactly what you need. Develop and use a checklist so you don't miss anything. &nbsp;Ask for example packets of others who have done this before....it will be most helpful!</span></font></div><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);"><br></span></font></div><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);">7. &nbsp;Remember the process takes time and its not going to happen overnight. &nbsp;Stay calm and continue to be a good soldier while you're waiting for everything to work its way up the chain. Don't over advertise what you're doing to others in the unit and don't try to do it with a group of others. &nbsp;Work alone and quietly....everyone will appreciate it. &nbsp;Once approved make sure you thank the folks you work with &nbsp;because you're probably not going to see about 90% of them ever again.</span></font></div><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);"><br></span></font></div><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);">Hope this helps!</span></font></div><div><font color="#4d4d4d"><span style="font-size: 14px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);">CPT Sweeney</span></font></div><div><br></div>
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1LT(P) Chemical, Biological, Radiological & Nuclear Officer
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Thank you sir for such beneficial information. Could you approximate the time it took from the beginning of the transition to when you finally signed into the USAR?
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LTC Training Officer
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1LT(P) (Join to see) - For me it took about 3 months. I completed the entire packet and teed the memorandum of support from my Battalion Commander myself and only asked him to sign it after I had everything ready to go. Form there it goes to Brigade level for BC approval and that's what took about 3 months. -MAJ S
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CW3 Mobility Officer
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I went from the Guard to the Reserves about nine years ago, it took me three months as well and I had passed my ETS. The average transfer time is 90-120 days. I had to sign a new contract with the Reserves, submit 1380's for pay and just wait for the paperwork to catch up. As long as you owe time you can be held. You don't want to generate any animosity along the way. CW3 L
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2LT Platoon Leader
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I'm considering going to graduate school in Texas. I currently live in Minnesota. I would think it would be less work for the Army to transition to the Reserves, continue serving in Texas for 2 years, then transfer back to a Reserve unit in Minnesota once I come back home. Would anyone recommend otherwise? Another reason to transition is similar to what has been said, there are somewhat better options in the Reserve. There is a chance I could find a closer unit in the city. My roommate is in the Reserves and quality of work sounds much better.
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SFC Agr Tng Nco
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dude, go to a reserve counselor, have them prep a dd-368 and then submit it to your unit, once they approve it (stay on top of it ), take that form back to the reserve recruiter and go from there. You will most likely have to go to MEPS and swear in and stuff like that, you may also have to pick a new MOS depending whats open and where.
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CW2 Aviation Maintenance Officer
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Where you a former recuiter, becasuse your answer was spot on.
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SFC Agr Tng Nco
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no , just went thru the process myself about a year ago and that's what I did.
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LTC Charles T Dalbec
LTC Charles T Dalbec
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No reason to see a recruiter. As stated you need to see a 79V Retention NCO and let them assist. Okay!! Hooah!
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LTC Charles T Dalbec
LTC Charles T Dalbec
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Chief I’m a former Retention Officer/HR Guru and I supplied what needs to be done by the Soldier. He/She needs to be persistent and follow up with what’s said until the reassignment is completed. ,
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BG Dep. Director, Military Programs
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I have seen the process take from a few days to over a year. As stated, the NG has historically been slow to release the troops to the USAR. However, reports from my Battalion Commanders state that it is improving because the NG is over strength in many areas. Look for this to accelerate as the drawdown is much more severe to the NG than USAR.
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