Posted on Sep 6, 2015
SGM C2 Sergeant Major
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I have worked with all the services frequently during my career. I see the ups and downs in each service. The Army seems to have the biggest attitude towards itself though. I would like to hear thoughts as to why Soldiers seems to talk bad or dislike the service that I love. Some may disagree this is true, but I do not think I am off base by stating this.

****FOLLOW UP QUESTION****

Do you think it is possible for the Army to ever show the universal pride in service that the USMC does?
Edited >1 y ago
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Sgt Aaron Kennedy, MS
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I don't think it's a comparative lack of pride in so much as it's the way it's "focused."

In the Marine Corps, we are very focused at the "Corps level" when it comes to pride. Just being a Marine. We don't really have "Unit" or "Branch" pride in the same sense that the Army does. But Marines talk smack the same way the Army does. we have our "haters" but being a much smaller service, and being much more geographically isolated also limits that exposure greatly.

But back to the Army. I think the Army tends to be much more "diversive" when it comes to culture. Legs vs Airborne, Ranger vs Ranger Qualified, Cav vs whatever Cav goes against. Then you get into the Units themselves, each with their own DEEP history and traditions. And then Branches, which I really have a hard time wrapping my head around. All we really have is Ground vs Wing... and we still deploy as MAGTFs.

This is just an outsider looking in.
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SSG John Eroh
SSG John Eroh
1 mo
As a retired Army Signal Corps SSG I have a lot of pride in my service but have more pride in being Signal Corps, especially of being fixed station versus tactical communications for my 20 years. Our technical standards were higher than for tactical commo where "good enough" was accepted. At one site, a E-6 who had come from a tactical background was told by the4 site chief to go by what I said because my whole background was in fixed commo. Didn't make the E-6 happy but going by what he though was OK would have brought some heat down. So we fixed guys did/do have a lot of pride.
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SSG John Eroh
SSG John Eroh
1 mo
SSG John Eroh - Tahe fixed commo MOS's usually required a higher GT & EL test scores too. We didn't express our pride to others as much but between each other we would put down others.
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PO1 Ron Clark
PO1 Ron Clark
1 mo
I think that because the Marines are the President's force, and can be ordered to hot spots without Congressional Approvement, this stands in the minds of the Marines, that they are almost always first to get to fight and this instills a special pride in them to be the best at what they do. This being said, In my 27 years I have yet to see a "Real" Army soldier i.e., "those who want to be in the Army", lacking pride. They too exhibit pride and professionalism, each branch has members who needs extra motivation, those who dont show the espirit de corp they way the service intends. This can be soldiered off if someone hopefully senior, mentors those individuals properly and help them along so they too can be proud of their profession.
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MAJ Tracy Pim
MAJ Tracy Pim
21 d
almost always first to the fight?????? i don't think so........
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GySgt Robin Boggs
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Marine boot camp is a transformation process. It may seem superficial, but Marines are EXPECTED to project a certain image when wearing the uniform; their success is reflected in their individual evaluations throughout their careers. Does this universal expectation exist in the Army, or is it up to the individual or the unit? I remember seeing a group of loud, chubby young women in BDUs hanging out and thinking to myself they would look just as at home in the ghetto except for the uniform. The transformation (basic training), the organization's expectations, and the image that the service members project all have a part in the input (recruits) and output of a particular branch of service. Maybe the Army just doesn't expect enough, so it's left to the individual soldier--some of whom are superstars.
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SPC Jerry Jones
SPC Jerry Jones
23 d
Well said GySgt Robin Boggs. I too think it is the boot camp transformation. The Marines have a very strict and rigorous boot camp, and the Army just has a basic boot camp (tough, but not as transformative). The transformation during boot camp molds you into what people see. It's a different mindset between the 2 branches. The camaraderie or Marines is 50 times tighter than the Army.
I think it is partly due to the uniforms as well. The Marines ,hands down, have the best looking uniforms and look so "badass" in them, while the Army has lame uniforms that look like high school ROTC uniforms.
EXAMPLE: If you take a child and put them in embarrassing clothing, they will have no pride...but put them in sharp, eye-catching clothing, and you will see pride emerging, and their confidence will shine while wearing them.
(I served 7 1/2 years in the Army, and loved it, but seeing Marines around base and in joint training always made me want to switch over to Marines.)
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GySgt Jim Plunkett
GySgt Jim Plunkett
20 d
1SG Paul Kern - 5 years in the Marine Corps? Still don't know how to spell Corps? (Core)
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SPC Keith Rayeski
SPC Keith Rayeski
18 d
I know and work with both, as well as retired air force, one retired navy and one retired coasty.....there's no difference, but the uniform.
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SP5 Ronald Williams
SP5 Ronald Williams
3 d
My son is a Ranger and very proud of his status. He strives to be the best of the best. It has been my observation that some posts such as Benning & Bragg are real army, while others are career prep for a civilian vocation. Let's face it, the army, overall has become soft except for infantry & special ops (Rangers & SF).
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CSM Michael J. Uhlig
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We like to say we empower our Junior Enlisted, the USMC actually empowers theirs....why do we hold back the rank of CPL, while the USMC has it as a normal progression for them....are we scared to trust our subordinates? When is the last time you've trained with a Marine unit or been on a base, it is constant training - all day, whether combatives, weapons, shooting, more weapons......we have to remember what our task is, and when we get away from our mission which is to kill the enemy (not wearing fluffy socks)......
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Sgt Jude Eschete
Sgt Jude Eschete
3 mo
According to MCO P1400.32D W CH 1-2, minimum regular promotion requirements.
Pvt -> PFC: 6 months TIG/6 months TIS
PFC -> LCpl: 8 months TIG/9 months TIS
LCpl -> Cpl: 8 months TIG/12 months TIS/Cutting Score Req
Cpl -> Sgt: 12 months TIG/24 months TIS/Cutting Score Req
Sgt -> SSgt: 27 months TIG/4 Years TIS/Board Selection
SSgt -> GySgt: 3 Years TIG/6 Years TIS/Board Selection
GySgt -> MSgt/1stSgt: 4 Years TIG/8 Years TIS/Board Selection
MSgt/1stSgt -> MGySgt/SgtMaj -> 3 Years TIG/10 Years TIS/Board Selection
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PFC Garion Hines
PFC Garion Hines
19 d
Oorah,Semper Fidelis.
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Cpl Clinton Britt
Cpl Clinton Britt
19 d
In the Marines, we hold NCO billet well before we pick Cpl up. Once we pick up Cpl we are normally moved the next leadership bullet. For ex: in a grunt unit, I have never seen a Cpl team leader it has always been a E-3 and a E-4 was a squad leader. That seems like 100 years ago
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MGySgt Joseph Magyar
MGySgt Joseph Magyar
18 d
while i was on recruiting duty a Major (army) was rifted by the army. He asked what rank he could get in the Corps. After being offered GySgt (E7) which de accepted. He came back to talk to me and stated that as a Gunny he had more authority as a Gunny then as an officer in the army. This authority and responsibility given to individuals as a lot to do with the pride that we feel.
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