Posted on May 14, 2015
SPC Jan Allbright, M.Sc., R.S.
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Marines-cpp
I was looking at both the Army and Marine method of combat pistol. To be quite frank I think the Marines have a better handle on this. What so you think?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sU17hG4zZvw
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Responses: 101
MSG Brad Sand
118
118
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Edited >1 y ago
As soon as you said 'Combat Pistol' everything that followed seemed a bit foggy. If you are in combat and going to your pistol...well I am praying for you already.
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1LT Nick Kidwell
1LT Nick Kidwell
10 d
I was once told by a combat-arms NCO that Iraqis didn't pay attention when you pointed a rifle at them because that happened all the time in the Middle East. But they paid attention when you pointed a pistol. According to this person, if someone under the Hussein regime drew a pistol, that's when someone else was about to get killed up close and personal.
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MAJ James Burns
MAJ James Burns
3 d
I served with the 11th ACR in Vietnam. I commanded an ACAV and used an M2 HB .50 cal. I also carried an M79 40mm grenade launcher and a M1911 .45. During Tet 1969, the VC stormed our vehicles from spider holes so close the .50s, M60s, and M79 were ineffective. I disposed of many enemy at close range with my .45. There were other times the pistol was very handy in close quarters combat. I’ll never not want a pistol in combat.
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1SG Ernest Stull
1SG Ernest Stull
2 d
Just my 2 cents the pistol in combat is a self defense weapon. With that being said If you shoot any weapon enough and yes experience matters, you can be an expert as long as no one else is shooting back at you. I earned a lot expert badges during my career and I Instructed Soldiers on weapons proficiency and how to shoot. but when the SHTF use whatever is available and be the best you can be with it. Hope that make sense.
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PO1 Kevin Dougherty
PO1 Kevin Dougherty
2 d
As a Coastie my perspective is a little different. From a practicality standpoint, first man over the side on a boarding carried a 1911. Second man had a slung 12 Ga. Others had a 1911. The entire party was covered from the ship by a .50 cal mount, usually on the starboard bridge wing. That was in the early days of interdiction, so it likely has changed. They have much better equipment and usually have helo or drone coverage these days.
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GySgt Wayne A. Ekblad
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Edited >1 y ago
Msm023_2
Marines (of course)! How could you have possibly thought otherwise? :-)
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CPT Canon To The Ordinary
CPT (Join to see)
11 mo
Uh-huh. LOL
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SGT Todd Morelock
SGT Todd Morelock
4 mo
I got the Army pistol expert badge and M16. Not that hard if you follow instructions..
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SSG Robert Clark
SSG Robert Clark
1 d
SGT Carl Blas - Congrats Marine, Though I do find it mildly ironic that the above cert. for the "Combat Handgun Coarse" doesn't depict a single soldier using a handgun. LOL.
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SGT Carl Blas
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1LT Platoon Leader
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As a federal agent I can tell you that based on this video their technique is just not the best. For example sticking both hand out and drawing the weapon all the way out when you can just shoot from the hip. In addition they seem to just look left and right before holstering their weapon, this is intended for the firer to watch his six, not just his left and right. Lastly, when they holster their weapon they need to do it without looking at their holster, one would not be able to see in the dark. Just some pointers. 
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LtCol G6
LtCol (Join to see)
28 d
Attempts to apply law enforcement techniques, where the pistol is your primary weapon and engagements are generally expected to be 1v1 at close quarters versus the military where the pistol is secondary and engagements may be 1v1 or 12 v 12 or whatever are misplaced. This is an annual qulaification course, not the course of fire for "high risk personnel" which does include hip firing, single handed firing, and firing behind obstacles etc.
Before you post a critique, know what you are critiquing and its purpose.
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SSgt Robert Van Buhler III
SSgt Robert Van Buhler III
9 d
Shooting from the hip? I think not. I also question fully extending your arms at rest with a pistol at ready as the repeated muscle memory training technique. I teach and was taught pulling in closer to the chest prevents taking away your weapon. As an NRA certified handgun instructor, I demonstrated, with blue guns, how to take a handgun away from someone with the gun extended like that. It is relatively easy to do with a judo-like sweep of the gun away from the person's strong arm while you pull it out of battery, especially if the shooter is disengaged from the trigger guard. The move works against the shooter's hand strength. A better technique is to bring your two hand hold in closer to your chest unless you are ready to shoot. Not like on TV where they go around corners with the gun sticking out into unknown territory. All of this is just on line palaver and palabra to keep us entertained, I suppose. But it is fun.
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SA Michael Moore
SA Michael Moore
1 d
A different perspective: In the late 40's, I lived with my grandparents and an uncle who was newly married and we all lived as a family in a single house. Granddad had been a deputy for a small town Jerry (uncle) was too young for War 2 and worked for Brinks armored deliivery in Alabama. I loved to listen to his exciting stories. One thing he told me was the way they learned to shoot. They had a shooting range in the basement of their office building and every guard had to fire?? rounds every day after they got off work but before they left for the day. They used .38 special revolvers, but their technique was not to aim, but instead to extend the index finger along the frame parallel to the barrel and point at the target.The claim was that you could accurately point at a target and with the practice could land the bullet there.
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SA Michael Moore
SA Michael Moore
1 d
I also recall him saying they believed you could always point accurately no matter where yur arms were.
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