Posted on Oct 8, 2019
PO3 Aaron Hassay
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COMNAVSURFORINST 3502.1e
CHAPTER 1
SURFACE FORCE TRAINING
SECTION 5
1501. General.

Selected Reservists are organized into units with specific mobilization billets, generally onboard active commands
(“gaining commands”)
1502. Training Philosophy. A primary objective in the training of the SELRES is the integration of individuals and units with their active
duty counterparts.

To the maximum extent possible, commanding officers should work to foster a close working relationship with their counterpart
reserve units by frequently communicating with them, coordinating the embarkation/debarkation of reserve unit personnel, and developing tailored training programs designed to optimize limited reserve active
duty training and personnel qualification opportunities. To achieve
these goals, Commanding Officers must recognize the inherent
limitations of the Reserve training environment and develop innovative programs to overcome these limitations. Stand­alone reserve units will work in close coordination with their ISICs and supported/supporting commanders. Training of reservists will be conducted per reference
(a).
a. Reserve Training Environment.
1. Inactive Duty Training (IDT) is accomplished two days per
month, usually on the weekend; Annual Training (AT) is accomplished two weeks per year.
2. Training for individual reservists must be sequenced, well
orchestrated, well defined, and must account for inherent problems of discontinuity. Close coordination and liaison between the NRF ship CO/XO/Training Officer and the reserve unit SELRES Coordinator and Administrator (reserve unit CO/XO) are key to a successful reserve training program. Remember that these reservists are members of your command and most of these individuals have previous active duty experience.

COMNAVSURFORINST 3502.1D CH­1
14 Oct 08
1­26
b. Personnel Qualifications (NRF Ships). NRF ship Commanding Officers are to assign all primary crew SELRES to Condition I and III watch stations. SELRES will use PQS to train for final qualification
in these watch stations. Qualification time lines are as assigned by
the commanding officer, commensurate with drill and annual training time available, present ship's employment, prior active duty, and PQS qualifications documented in service record page 4's. Once PQS qualified for their Condition I and III assignments, SELRES may undertake other PQS, such as inport watch stations and ESWS. General DC and 3M qualifications should be accomplished early in the SELRES' tour of duty in conjunction with initial Condition I and III watch
station PQS. This watch station assignment/job accomplishment policy applies only to the NRF primary crew SELRES and not to the SELRES who perform one time annual training in support of fleet operations.

1504. Naval Reserve Force (NRF) Readiness Criteria. NRF units are generally tasked with the same training requirements as their active
duty counterparts. However, due to limited days underway with selected reservists embarked, and limited availability of inport trainers, these
units may experience training degradation beyond their control. Accordingly, NRF units may complete the advanced unit phase of training without achieving C1/M1 readiness in all primary mission areas. The mission area readiness ratings listed in Figure 1­5­1 specifically
prescribe the minimum acceptable standards for NRF units at the end of advanced training and during repetitive (proficiency) training.


How was I at 18 to overcome the Inherrent Limitations of sporadically being put on a guided missle frigate for 5 years forced to try to fit in and not be affected by being insecure when all the other sailors knew what was going on and some in deck would isolate bully threaten assault, not to mentions sea sickness constantly being sent home without health care benefits of leadership access, and I was far below poverty and education and professional development socially economically in all realms just starting my life on and off the ship.

I was 18, after meritorious bootcamp gradation, assigned to guided missile frigates for 5 years with a reserve SAM enlistment. The instructions specifically mention most sailors had previous active duty experience at sea. What if you did not? What if you were 18 and forced to acclimate qualify with all these “Inherrent Limitiations” and no other SAM enlisted on the ship. Yes that is correct I was the only SAM on a ship of 200 guys. My Navy Army Transfer and the medical disqualifications starts making a lot of sense now 1998 off the ship.

Can you imagine sprinting for days or weeks or month straight no idea how to pace yourself on high alert trying to absorb all these things on a a ship and sent home beat up sea sick emotionally drained every month for 5 years?
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LCDR Mike Morrissey
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As a career Naval Officer and one who spent the latter half in training and administration of reserves (twice a reserve center c.o., a readiness command surface program manager, two shipboard tours, and Reserve Surface Force Program Officer), I am at a loss as to what you are asking. It seems that you were an interservice transfer from the Army and still don’t understand the armed forces expectation that you take responsibility for getting your quals done? On the other hand, chronic seasickness is just as much a disqualifier as airsickness for flight crew. It’s a physical issue and not uncommon, but still a disqualifier just as color blindness and bad vision. I’ve known new officers and others who just never could function. Some could not step foot on a ship...how they got commissioned?? The answers are plentiful.

There are thousands of sailors who enter the same program you signed up for and have been successful—some just satisfactorily to others who are exemplary. There are the quals standards for basic seamanship and those for promotion. All are obvious and available. Success sometimes can be just by the luck of the draw. Why I survived without a scratch an 80mm mortar attack and the guy several steps away from me lost his whole face...

All that being said, if you approached your time in the Navy in the same manner as your above stated quandary I can understand the responses you experienced. The Armed Forces are difficult, a very different life and not fair. I’m a retired surface warfare officer and a riverine combat vet. I really wanted to be a pilot but my eyesight changed in flight school. I seldom got the desired geographical assignments as the needs of the service is the reality. Some assignments sucked, and some COs were idiots but they were the CO.

It now all depends on what you decide to do to take your tough experiences, learn from them and make them work for you.
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PO3 Aaron Hassay
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Basically why I am struggling is I am about 20 years delayed socially economically in experience a smart man usually is able to attain with some goals leadership that are normal time tested and customary as most apprenticeships are in all other professional endeavors.

My my fiance who i met at 19 and left me at 22, my mom my younger sister and brother watched and were burdened and affected when I fell apart and started having psych problems off the ship under such pressures of assignment of the ship that I was very proud to have served but got really violently ill in various ways.
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LCDR Mike Morrissey
LCDR Mike Morrissey
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While others have denigrated the VA and seem to outshout we who have experienced the benefits of that system, I would recommend you seek assistance from the VA. There are training programs, mental health assistance and other helps. Your description of your situation may even qualify for some disability compensation. You may even qualify for special funding to get you through vocational training.

The main thing to remember is that nobody will seek you out. It takes your initiative, but you are not alone...seek out the DAV or even drop in to a VA clinic. There are also State VA offices.
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PO3 Aaron Hassay
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https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7lQ90By3XqwelhaOEZWeGxDQ00/view?usp=drivesdk

CHAPTER IV
NAVY MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS
I. INTRODUCTION
A. General
This chapter outlines the Navy's requirements for active,reserve, and civilian manpower for FY 1992 through FY 1994.

Further, it reviews the Navy's initiatives and programs geared to meet the challenge of maintaining their readiness posture within the context of a more fiscally constrained environment.

The Navy must be able to fill key positions to perform its mission successfully and safely. Therefore, the recruiting and retention of high caliber officer and enlisted personnel to man our technologically-sophisticated Navy remains a top priority. Retention of experienced enlisted personnel during force drawdown will require stable levels of compensation, continued advancement opportunity and an acceptable quality of life for both the sailor and his/her family.

Navy Manpower
Active
480,800
Reserve
113,400
SAM Sea Air Mariner
893
Civilian
250,800


The Sea and Air Mariner program, a non-prior service accession program inaugurated in FY 1984 to help the Naval Reserve meet its junior enlisted personnel mobilization requirements, is drawing down to maximize the retention of spaces for the more highly trained and skilled veteran personnel. An offshoot of this program, Sea and AirMariner II (SAM II), was developed specifically to place individuals serving two years on Initial Active Duty Training, onboard FFT 1052class ships. With the cancelation of the FFT program, the SAM II program draws down in FY 1994.


3. Naval Forces Manpower

‘phased reduction of junior unskilled positions in active shipaugmentation units.’



Even More rare is the SAM enlistment was drawn down the same year I signed it 1994 and there were only 900 SAM in the whole Navy and its safe to say out of those 900 a few like me were fresh recruits 18, and most would not see a ship.
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PO3 Aaron Hassay
PO3 Aaron Hassay
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SGT Javier Silva

I answered below in this feed. Sometimes I am not asking questions as much as review and conversation over instructions reports I have over the very specific commands and enlistment I had. Then it always spawns into the fact I was actually the son of a Army soldier 66-68 11 LIB recently discovered knowledge about 10 years ago and my grandpa his dad WW2 Navy Battle Coral Sea and Guadalcanal and I am trying to process all this.
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PO3 Aaron Hassay
PO3 Aaron Hassay
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SGT Javier Silva https://youtu.be/LyWM8oom_GU

Here is me attempting to start a community project in west Oakland 2008. Tools were stolen that same summer in grand theft
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PO3 Aaron Hassay
PO3 Aaron Hassay
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https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BydOn6Wn4iwoMXdtRDBxRlFMRlg4WE9icHdLRUg0SkpjOE5z/view?usp=drivesdk this is a write up about the project. My Name Hassay is my fathers and Salmon my mom. My parents divorced when I was like 8 and my dad disappeared for the most part later to be discovered some 20-30 years later like 2005 in VA care an injured Army Soldier Veteran Vietnam 11 LIB 66-68 RIP Love That GUY

I was able to keep Hassay to join the Navy well because the Name change was not complete when I joined
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SGT Javier Silva
SGT Javier Silva
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PO3 Aaron Hassay - You cannot ask us to help you decipher something without asking what exactly you want to know. This was posted as a question, but then no question was asked.
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