Posted on Apr 20, 2014
CPT Health Services Administration
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Being part of the Army Medical Department, I am aware of great diversity within the field. You have your super-hooah special operations medical personnel and you have personnel who always have/will work in a clinic/hospital.<div><br></div><div>Whenever I enter a clinic environment or hospital, I cannot help but notice the lack of discipline as well as customs/courtesies at times. I do realize that military hospitals may not even be on a military post and that many providers are direct commissionees. Even though the focus of a&nbsp;<font color="#000000" face="Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, Arial, san-serif"><span style="line-height: 16px;">Table of Distribution and Allowances (TDA) unit is not directly going to war, I feel there should be more emphasis put on military discipline and customs/courtesies. I believe in a comfortable work environment but also one&nbsp;that is disciplined/professional. I am not saying there should be&nbsp;courtesy patrol roving a military hospital, but maybe a blue book distributed so providers are aware that they should not walk around constantly talking on their cell phones in uniform. Just a thought/suggestion...what do you think?</span></font></div>
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SPC(P) Analyst
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Though customs and courtesies are important, sometimes they can be a hindrance to mission performance. For example, when my direct boss was a LTC he told me flat out that it was more important to rapidly convey information then bother with standing at attention etc. I still called him sir of course and outside the office it was back to stringently following the guidelines, but when time is a crucial factor the mission is going to come before niceties.
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SSG V. Michelle Woods
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I'd say yes absolutely. Of course this falls on the leadership allowing it to get too relaxed. I understand the need to adjust operations for certain jobs, for instance, it's impractical to have an S1 clerk stand at parade rest while fixing your ERB.&nbsp;<div><br></div><div>In my case, I worked at brigade as a SPC and SGT and got so used to working with senior leaders that every once in a while I would get too relaxed. Plus when I would go to parade rest, the senior would look at me crazy which made me feel stupid lol. Luckily I had those "mean" NCOs and one officer who would enforce basic customs and courtesies which I am so grateful for now.&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div><br></div>
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LT Jessica Kellogg
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I think a medical environment is one situation where a doctor-patient relationship should take precedence over military formalities. &nbsp;As a patient I'd prefer the newest, most junior corpsman speak to me directly rather than worry about me being an officer. &nbsp;Likewise, my doctor is a Commander; I do call him Sir and give him the appropriate respect. &nbsp;But I do appreciate that he first introduced himself as "doctor" not "commander," I think it helps alleviate the potential nerves of speaking to someone of significantly higher rank.<div><br></div><div>That being said, I do think medical providers should observe military courtesies amongst one another, especially in front of patients. &nbsp;But also, I understand that health care is a different environment and so has different requirements. &nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>I also think that the prevalence of civilian providers in military treatment facilities contributes to this more lax attitude.</div><div><br></div><div>Sorry if this reply was all over the place...<br><div><br></div><div><br></div></div>
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