Posted on Dec 23, 2013
Col Regional Director, Whem/Ssa And Congressional Liaison
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It's likely happened to all of us at one time or another, you didn't volunteer for an event... rather, somehow or someway you were *drumroll please*... "volun-told;" since we've all been there, I'm pretty sure there's some absolutely hilarious stories out there... so, what was yours? It could have worked-out well, and actually been an interesting and maybe even rewarding experience in hindsight, or maybe not so much! lol The aim here is to share those memorable events, duties, etc. that you were voluntold for, as well as any lessons learned, and wisdom gained. The idea here is to open a fun and enlightening inter-service conversation, on the one thing that we all definitely have in common across the "joint spectrum of operations." lol So, put on your thinking caps folks, pull up a keyboard, and let's get this thing started; thank you for all that you do, and... see you all in the discussion threads!
Edited >1 y ago
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Cpl Ray Fernandez
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There was one time when I was voluntold to drive a few Marines out to a training range to clean up brass. I had to drive out about 3 in the morning for some odd reason. There were a few times that I drove in my sleep. The Sgt in charge told everyone not to wake me because I drove the hummer much better in my sleep. I drove to that range so often I could actually drive it without looking.

Another Marine in my platoon once said that I spent so much time driving to the different ranges and training areas at 29 Palms, that I could tell when a rock moved.
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SSgt Brycen Shumway
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While I was stationed out at Beale AFB, CA; I got the lucky draw to be volun-told for the Honor Guard. I was somewhat interested in what they did; never expected that one.

Come to find out I was one of a small handful of people on the base who fit the exact dimensions for the bases mascot, "The Dragon-Lady". Mostly used in Parades down town Yuba City/Marysville.

So, yeah... That happened.
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TSgt Quality Assurance, Launch Recovery Team/Detachment Supervisor
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I'm so sorry SSgt Shumway but the thought of you rocking the dragging lady at the Yuba City Peach Festival is bringing me to tears with laughter. Good on you!
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TSgt Quality Assurance, Launch Recovery Team/Detachment Supervisor
TSgt (Join to see)
7 y
Oops dragon not dragging. Darn autocorrect
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SSgt Brycen Shumway
SSgt Brycen Shumway
7 y
Ha! Someone actually knows the suit! It slowly grew on me over time. After I PCS'd I got into Cosplaying. So far I only have 1 costume (Altair from Assassin's Creed), but I'm working on skills that will help me make my own costumes. As for the Dragonlady... She needs an updated suit.
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CMDCM Gene Treants
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I was a Brand New Petty Officer Third Class on my first ship and on my very first port visit to a foreign country during my very first Mediterranean Cruise. On our Very First night I port, my section had the Duty and I was told that I was on Shore Patrol.

USS Cambria (APA-36) was a Fast Attack Troop Transport and we were carrying a fully equipped Marine Unit as a part of the Task Force. We were in port in Valletta, Malta. was really excited to be in a really foreign country, but bummed out at not being able to go out and have fun with my friends.

Shore Patrol on Gators is a little different from other ships. We went out in teams, Sailors and Marines making up each Team of two. My teammate was a grizzled combat vet, a Staff Sargent, willing to teach me about being on Shore Patrol. As we walked, he talked and told me Sea Stories of Ports all over the World and his various adventures. Finally at one bar, there was s fight and he went in to break it up, sending me to get help at the corner. I went and got the ready partoll back up and they took care of the survivors. Then the Sgt. and I resumed our patrol.

I learned two valuable lessons that night: 1) Always take a Marine on Shore Patrol if you can get one. And 2) Volunteer for Shore Patrol the First Night in a new port. You get to learn all the Good Places and where the fun really is.

BTW: on Shore patrol Sailors wore Arm Bands with SP on them, Guard Belts, and Night Sticks. The only exception was in Turkey. There we went out in three man teams, The third man carried a Radio and none of us carried a Night Stick. Night Sticks in Turkey were considered weapons and we were not allowed to carry any, but of was called for help, Turkish Military Po;ice would respond with their Night Sticks, Knives, Pistols, and Automatic Machine Guns,
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PO1 Master-at-Arms
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7 y
So much for not having night sticks back then! Nowadays they make collapsible batons so they're more incognito and can be carried at many places. And your number 1 and 2 could be added to a list of Murphy's Law of Shore Patrol
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