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Command Post What is this?
Posted on Sep 1, 2014
RallyPoint Team
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COL Jean (John) F. B.
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Edited 8 y ago
I don't know the parameters of this study, but I assume it is not really an accurate reflection of the percentage of domestic violence of military personnel as compared to the population as a whole. I have seen other such studies over the years that alleged that military personnel had more child abuse, spouse abuse, etc. and I questioned them, as well.

While I certainly do not think that there is no problem with domestic/child abuse in the military, I believe the actual percentage, as compared to the overall population is not anywhere near one-third. What I believe this study and others fail to take into consideration is that military personnel are more prone to report abuse; if not the victim, certainly others who know or suspect the abuse.

Neighbors in military housing report family violence much more than neighbors in civilian neighborhoods who "don't want to get involved".

Victims are also much more likely to report abuse to a service member's chain of command than they are to a civilian employer (who, frankly, typically does not care about employees' personal issues when not at work).

Victims confide in other service members/spouses/children, which then, more often than not, end up being reported through the chain of command. That simply does not happen in the civilian world.

There is a problem in the military with domestic violence, however, I do not think the stats stated are accurate.
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SN Investigator
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Edited 1 y ago
The problem of domestic violence never disappears from the pages of news publications, the issue is very serious and thanks to the Internet people are uniting efforts and looking for ways to improve the situation around the world, I recommend you this link https://papersowl.com/examples/domestic-violence/ to a useful collection of materials about domestic violence, which lists various cases with children, wives or situation in different states and regions, study the analysis of this problem and know more, offer your options for solutions in small steps and be an adequate role model yourself.
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SGT Mark Sullivan
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Had a good friend and roommate, while I was stationed on Ft Story, who was beat up by his wife regularly. To add insult to injury, she would show up at the commanders office the day after the incident and blame everything on my roommate. There would be no mark on her whatsoever, where he would be black and blue, fat lip, black eye, etc... He would get punished because she said it was him. Turns out she was cheating on him with someone from another branch, and planned this out so she could see her boyfriend while he was confined. When he finally found out who the guy was, he got pissed up drunk, drove to the guys barracks and beat the crap out of the guy. He had finally snapped. Was this his fault or his wife's fault. He had never laid a hand on his wife
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COL Jean (John) F. B.
COL Jean (John) F. B.
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I saw several similar situations over the years. Folks would be surprised at the number of "battered husbands" out there. Part of the issue is that the male is afraid to "hit back" (nor should he -- he should simply walk away) and is certainly reluctant to report the wife (much more so than the wife is to report the husband, even with that reporting much less than actual occurrences).
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