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Command Post What is this?
Posted on Dec 15, 2015
RallyPoint Team
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Responses: 12
COL John Hudson
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Edited 4 y ago
As a hiring manager for an international travel card organization, I reviewed numerous resumes daily. Best = no more than two single pages. Address the hiring requirements up front and on point. A resume is a snapshot - NOT a life story. One will get into the details during an actual interview. Be flexible; different career organizations may use varying types of printed and/or on-line resumes that don't follow a standard format, so there's no "one size fits all" with this. Brief, concise, and to the point always got my first attention. I set those aside for a more thorough and detailed examination. And yes, by all means please 'demilitarize' your verbiage. I understand we are all proud of our military achievements and awards, but the common civilian in business won't recognize their value as readily as any individual with previous military experience will. Usually, the last area on a resume asks for information concerning recognition or awards. I did not make it a practice to list all the items awarded to me during my service, simply stating rather, "Numerous military awards and accolades." The interviewer would then inquire as to what those were and I was given full opportunity to explain. And one final point. A lot of businesses out there use on-line job application forms. They receive thousands of such applications daily. What makes you any different? What can you do to stand out? Very simple and locked in the stone of long experience. Hand carry your printed resume to the company you applied for on-line and ask to see the hiring manager or staff. There will NEVER be any better method of marketing yourself than a face-to-face introduction. Tell that person you've stopped by to meet them personally and drop off your resume. Trust me on this one - you will plant a seed and leave an unforgettable impression that any on-line application can't match.
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CPT Steve Curley
CPT Steve Curley
4 y
Great advice!!!! As a retired COO I add one more item. Spend as much time on a well written single page cover letter. Many times I never got to a resume because individuals applying for senior positions had written an ineffective cover letter. Remember the cover letter is your means of presenting yourself and your resume to the hiring manager.
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CAPT Tom Bersson
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the article is okay. My advice: 1. Do not use an objective statement unless you have a focused resume. Otherwise they are too limiting. 2. Remove acronyms. 3. Do not attempt to de-militarize your resume to the point that they get confused on who you are and what you have done. I've seen many resumes where they made grand assumptions about the civilian equivalent of their military jobs and they are usually wrong.
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CPT W Brown
CPT W Brown
4 y
Great advice CAPT Tom. #1 and #2 are absolutely spot on. #3 is to put military experiences in terms that industry can understand. I think mine back in the day explained the scope - # of people, equipment, $, leadership, and performance of the unit - as a mechanized infantry Co CO. As to my last duty assignment, all I wrote was 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne). Even back in the mid-1970s, SF needed no translation to any potential employer I faced.
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Capt Brandon Charters
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Great Command Post here. Doing the homework on a company who is considering hiring you is so critical. Even more than looking online, connect with employees (Vets if you can) and ask them what it's like to work there. Start thinking about solving their biggest challenges before ever walking in the door and make your unique skills stand out as you walk them through it.
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CPT W Brown
CPT W Brown
4 y
Good job, Capt Brandon. I suggest folks hit LinkedIn re the potential company, focusing on PAST employees. They will almost always be flattered you're asking and will spill their guts, especially if they had a marginal to bad experience.
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