Posted on Jan 10, 2019
SPC Detention Supervisor
22.8K
1.15K
180
145
145
0
This is a question cadre keeps asking us at Chow before we leave. Kinda makes me wonder what made others choose this path.
Avatar_feed
Responses: 109
LTC Leonard M. Manning, Sr
89
89
0
I started my Army career as an enlisted soldier and served almost 6 years in various units ending in the 82d Airborne Division and having a roaring good time jumping out of airplanes. While there I met the 2LT that would change my outlook. My 2LT was not the brightest bulb in teh package and I figured that I was at least as smart as he. So I turned down SSG, ETS'd, returned home to start college. I graduated and recieved my commission in 1981. I served as an Officer for 28 yeaars and retired as a LTC. In all I held 9 ranks Enlisted to Officer. And, I must say that I enjoyed both sides.
(89)
Comment
(0)
PO1 Lyndon Thomas
PO1 Lyndon Thomas
1 mo
LTC, I had a similar story, and the inspiration was a man much like yourself. A hard Charging E9 who decided to become a Warrant Officer. He was the epitome of every soldiers Dream Leader. Combat proven and battle tested Hardened by service and worthy of the highest honor. Needless to say, when he asked me if I would consider Officer Candidate School (OCS) I turned it down. It was earl in my military career and I figured I had plenty of time to consider. I loved being ground forces. I started in the military with five (5) years of AROTC, and actually went to Airborne jump school in Fort Campbell as my last year in ROTC, but decided the Army was my Grandfather and my fathers choice. I chose Navy. Salute to all the men and women who become Officers and Leaders in our Armed Forces. You Are Necessary!
(2)
Reply
(0)
SFC David mCgILLIS
SFC David mCgILLIS
1 mo
Great story. I, on the other hand elected not to apply to OCS. My reason for NOT applying for and/or going to OCS, has a bit of a longer story. I grew up with my Annapolis Grad grandfather who commanded his own Destroyer during WWII, my Great Grandfather was an Army Engineer Officer during WWI, but I did not want to go to college… I wanted to be a Tanker and nothing but a tanker.
After being in the Army for ten years as a Tanker and being an E-5 promotable for four years with a wife and three children, it was time to do something.
In 1993 my chain of command was all for it and behind me (CO was a West Point Grad), my Lieutenant was prior service who ETS’d after his first enlistment, then went back to school in Montana and gained his commission that way. While stationed at Fort Riley, they sent me off to do a full semester at Kansas State University, to fulfill a good chunk of the College requirements. Then I came down on orders to go to Korea for a year. I knew I would be able to get the remaining college credits while I was there, so the plan was still in place, to apply before I even finished my first eleven years in the Army.
On the way to Korea, I stopped at home for a week to visit with my grandpa and when my wife told him my plans of applying for OCS, the salty ol naval commander was ecstatic. Sitting down in his man cave (best way I can describe it) with him, he asked me all about it. I filled him in on what I had done and what I was looking at and he said, “You don’t seem very excited about it, what’s wrong?”
I explained that even IF I was accepted to OCS, there was no guarantee I would be placed as an Armor Officer and I could kiss my blessed tanks goodbye. I went on to explain, that even IF I was commissioned as an Armor officer, I would only be on tanks for 12-18 months, then it would be off to a desk. I went on to tell him if all went well, I could possibly get a tank as a company XO and if/when I made captain, it would be another 12-18 months max, as a company commander… then back to a desk. If I were fortunate enough to make Major, I may get the chance to be a Battalion XO and might get a tank again for another 12-18 months, then back to a desk…
In the way only an ol salty naval commander can do it, my grandpa said “So why the hell are you going to do it?” I told him about the pay difference and that with almost ten years in the Army already, I had to start thinking about my financial future.
My grandpa just leaned back in his chair and chuckled, before he said “David, if it is just about the money… don’t do it.” He went on to say, if you really want to be successful, you have to be doing something that you are not only good at, but enjoy what you are doing. I am not going to live forever (he did make it to 92 years old), but when that day does come, YOU will not need to worry about money!
Although receiving a substantial inheritance was never ever going to be a guarantee, what he said to me really stuck with me. I knocked out a total of 87 more credit hours while stationed in Korea, earned two ARCOM’s, an AAM, the Commanding Generals award, a fist full of coins and finally made the cut off list and pinned on my E-6. I retired from the Army in 2003 and although I may not have become an officer, but I was damn sure treated like one, just by being myself and doing all that I could to be a bad-ass tanker.
To all of you that have serve and/or are serving, I salute you. To those of you that are tanker, it truly is the best job you will ever have… HOOAH and Charlie Mike.
David McGillis
SFC (Ret)
(2)
Reply
(0)
CSM Charles Hayden
CSM Charles Hayden
1 mo
SFC Greg Bruorton A Peter Principle promotion caught me also. No problem, I soon sensed it was above my level, retired and never looked back!
(2)
Reply
(0)
MAJ Mike Yeksavich
MAJ Mike Yeksavich
7 d
That is the same reason I went to law school. I never dream it possible until I mets some law students and came to the conclusion I was as smart as they was. The reason I was an officer is because my father, a career Air Force Sergeant (B-17 tail gunner), brought me up telling me I would not go into the military as he did so off to Army ROTC I went.
(0)
Reply
(0)
Avatar_small
MAJ Contracting Officer
62
62
0
Because I got sick of dealing with dumb LT's so I figured I should be one :)
(62)
Comment
(0)
MAJ Contracting Officer
MAJ (Join to see)
9 mo
Lt Col Paul Boley - I'm sure several people think so!
(6)
Reply
(0)
Sgt Mark Tarte
Sgt Mark Tarte
9 mo
I LOVE this answer!
(6)
Reply
(0)
Capt Christian D. Orr
Capt Christian D. Orr
6 mo
ZING!! (Prior enlisted myself, for the record.)
(2)
Reply
(0)
Lt Col John (Jack) Christensen
(0)
Reply
(0)
Avatar_small
CPT Jack Durish
47
47
0
I couldn't imagine not being an officer. I had finished college and law school before enlisting. I also had my Coast Guard license and was pursuing a commission in the Navy. They screwed around with my application until I went to see the Army recruiter and they immediately talked about a direct commission in JAG which I didn't want so I enlisted with a commitment to Infantry OCS. How's that for a round about answer?
(47)
Comment
(0)
Capt Christian D. Orr
Capt Christian D. Orr
6 mo
SrA Tony Cos Oh wow! Though he wasn’t a law school grad at the time, just a mere baccalaureate degree holder at the time, but one of college student newspaper colleagues enlisted as a PJ and successfully completed the pipeline.....never even bothered going to OTS after they finally opened to PJ career field to O’s (the Combat Rescue Officer AFSC).
(5)
Reply
(0)
SSgt Boyd Herrst
SSgt Boyd Herrst
2 mo
You must of had them scratching their heads on that.. turn down a easy direct commission in JAG to go infantry..
(4)
Reply
(0)
SSgt Boyd Herrst
SSgt Boyd Herrst
2 mo
Oh.. payback can be hell.. and that works both ways,.. eh CPT Jack Durish
(3)
Reply
(0)
CPT Jack Durish
CPT Jack Durish
1 mo
Capt Christian D. Orr - O-3, thus the Capt Jack. Actually Army Captain and Coast Guard Licensed Captain
(4)
Reply
(0)
Avatar_small

Join nearly 2 million former and current members of the US military, just like you.

close
Seg?add=7750261&t=2