Posted on Feb 27, 2014
LTC David Chang
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Studying past battles is important to learn lessons on tactics, leadership, strategy, etc. I enjoy history and the outcome of some of these battles. There are lesser known ones like Admiral Yi-Soon Shin who was the first to invent an iron-clad warship (The Turtle Ship, not the Monitor and Merrimac) and with 13 of them defeated 133 japanese ships, saving the country from annihilation.

I believe the battle of Hastings in 1066 where William of Normandy invaded England, the battle of stalingrad, the battle of Gettysburg, and Incheon Landing are other really big battles that changed the outcome of history.

What are your battles and why?

Posted in these groups: Herodotos_met_91.8 History (Major)3da17ee6 Events
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Responses: 14
SFC Greg Bruorton
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Custer's Last Stand--25 June 1876 became the pivotal point when the U.S. Army began focusing all its manpower and weaponry against the Plains Indians with the objective to bring that war to an end.

Although this was a major victory for Crazy Horse, Chief of the Oglala Sioux, it was only the beginning of the demise of the American Indian on the Great Plains. He knew it, as for a full year, he and his small band of Oglalas tried their best to reach the Canadian border and to ultimate safety. But that was not to be.

Crazy Horse and his followers had depleted their ability to protect themselves from the overwhelming power of the U.S. military and consequently turned himself over to the Commander at Robinson Barracks, Nebraska Territory, in September 1877. The chief was thrown into the brig.

Having only a knife he kept hidden, Crazy Horse broke loose from the escort that was proceeding toward the freshly constructed gallows in his honor. As a result, one of his tribesman, on duty as an Indian policeman at the time, thrust his bayonet through the side of the chief, thus fulfilling a vision Crazy Horse had had when he was a youth that he was to end his days of mortality by one of his own.

With the spirit and backbone of the Sioux finally broken, the U.S. Army was now ready to focus strongly on the capture of Geronimo and his renegade followers in Arizona by the full activation of the 9th and 10th Cavalry Regiments--the Buffalo Soldiers. Geronimo surrendered for the second time in 1886 and was shipped to a Florida prison by train, accompanied by the loyal Apache scouts of the U.S. Army as dictated by General Nelson A. Miles.

The Seventh Cavalry was not ready to forgive and forget their humiliating defeat at the Little Big Horn. As a consequence, troopers from the Seventh rounded up unarmed men, women, and children of the Oglalas and massacred them in December 1890 (The Wounded Knee Massacre.)
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LTC Stephen F.
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LTC David Chang Kursk and Midway affected WWII dramatically. Agincourt and Crecy affected the 100 years war and mounted knights recognized they were vulnerable.
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1SG Fred "SARGE" Bucci
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I think the Battle of Okinawa was a key in WWII. The length of time it took to take this tiny island and the number of casualties we incurred was critical in not attempting to invade mainland Japan. It forced Pres. Truman's hand to resort in using the atomic bomb. If we did invade mainland Japan we would have lost well over a million service men. Japanese civilians to include children were prepared to fight to the death for their emperor. Not to mention the number of Kamikaze's they had to hit our ships. The Japanese people were fanatical believing that if they were to die for the emperor their spirit would live forever.
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