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LTC Stephen F.
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Thanks SP5 Mark Kuzinski for honoring Medal of Honor recipient Chaplain (Major) Charles Watters
Images: 1. Chaplain (Major) Charles J. Watters celebrates Mass in Vietnam with his chaplain assistant (name unknown) shortly before his death (November 19, 1967). The U. S. Army Chaplain Center & School is named in his honor – Watters Hall.
Photo courtesy of the U. S. Army Chaplain Museum, Fort Jackson, South Carolina
2. Chaplain (Major) Charles J. Waters
3. 1967-11-19 Chaplain (Major) Charles J. Waters Medal of Honor tombstone

Here is his Medal of Honor Citation
The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the
Medal of Honor to
*WATTERS, CHARLES JOSEPH
Rank and organization: Chaplain (Maj.), U .S. Army, Company A, 173d Support Battalion, 173d Airborne Brigade. Place and Date: Near Dak To Province, Republic of Vietnam, 19 November 1967. Entered service at: Fort Dix, N.J. Born: 17 January 1927, Jersey City, N.J.
Citation:
For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Chaplain Watters distinguished himself during an assault in the vicinity of Dak To. Chaplain Watters was moving with one of the companies when it engaged a heavily armed enemy battalion. As the battle raged and the casualties mounted, Chaplain Watters, with complete disregard for his safety, rushed forward to the line of contact. Unarmed and completely exposed, he moved among, as well as in front of the advancing troops, giving aid to the wounded, assisting in their evacuation, giving words of encouragement, and administering the last rites to the dying. When a wounded paratrooper was standing in shock in front of the assaulting forces, Chaplain Watters ran forward, picked the man up on his shoulders and carried him to safety. As the troopers battled to the first enemy entrenchment, Chaplain Watters ran through the intense enemy fire to the front of the entrenchment to aid a fallen comrade. A short time later, the paratroopers pulled back in preparation for a second assault. Chaplain Watters exposed himself to both friendly and enemy fire between the 2 forces in order to recover 2 wounded soldiers. Later, when the battalion was forced to pull back into a perimeter, Chaplain Watters noticed that several wounded soldiers were lying outside the newly formed perimeter. Without hesitation and ignoring attempts to restrain him, Chaplain Watters left the perimeter three times in the face of small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire to carry and to assist the injured troopers to safety. Satisfied that all of the wounded were inside the perimeter, he began aiding the medics--applying field bandages to open wounds, obtaining and serving food and water, giving spiritual and mental strength and comfort. During his ministering, he moved out to the perimeter from position to position redistributing food and water, and tending to the needs of his men. Chaplain Watters was giving aid to the wounded when he himself was mortally wounded. Chaplain Watters' unyielding perseverance and selfless devotion to his comrades was in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Army. "
Vietnam Combat Chaplain Charles Watters
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSAr4cb3s5k
FYI COL Mikel J. Burroughs LTC Stephen C. LTC Wayne Brandon LTC Bill Koski Capt Seid Waddell Capt Tom Brown Maj Marty Hogan SFC William Farrell SSgt Robert Marx PO1 William "Chip" Nagel SPC Margaret Higgins MSgt (Join to see) AN Christopher Crayne SPC Tom DeSmet SGT Charles H. Hawes SGT (Join to see) SGT Michael Thorin
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Capt Seid Waddell
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One does not expect a chaplain to be awarded the MOH. He must have been something else!
RIP Chaplain Watters.
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SP5 Mark Kuzinski
SP5 Mark Kuzinski
>1 y
Great question Capt Seid Waddell !
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SP5 Mark Kuzinski
SP5 Mark Kuzinski
>1 y
http://v-forvictory.blogspot.com/2013/04/the-medal-of-honor-chaplains.html?m=1

The (Congressional) Medal of Honor was established in 1861, during the Civil War. The qualifications for being awarded the Medal have been tightened up and refined over the years, but it is currently awarded to a member of the U.S. military for acts of intrepidity and gallantry above and beyond the call of duty while involved in combat operations.

Since the Medal of Honor was established, it has been awarded to nine chaplains. Four Protestant chaplains were awarded the Medal for their service during the Civil War: John Milton Whitehead (Chaplain, U.S. Army, 15th Indiana Infantry); Francis Bloodgood Hall (Chaplain, U.S. Army, 16th New York Infantry); James Hill (1st Lieutenant, U.S. Army, Company I, 21st Iowa Infantry); and Milton Lorenzo Haney (Regimental Chaplain, U.S. Army, 55th Illinois Infantry). One Catholic priest serving the Confederate Army, Fr. Emmeran Bliemel, O.S.B., was killed at the Battle of Jonesboro while administering last rites -- the first American chaplain to die on the field of battle -- and is said to have been postumously awarded the Southern Cross of Honor.

Since the Civil War, five more American chaplains have been awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. Every one of them was a Catholic priest, and two have causes for beatification. The fifth member of this exclusive society of Medal of Honor priests was inducted just this week, with the award of the Medal to Servant of God Emil J. Kapaun, for his valor during the Korean War. Herewith the five priests who have been awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor:

SFC (Join to see) SMSgt Dr. G. A. Thomas Capt Christopher MuellerCOL Mikel J. Burroughs Cynthia Croft SSgt (Join to see)Capt Seid WaddellSrA Christopher Wright LTC Stephen F. PO2 Richard C. MSG Tom EarleyPVT James Strait Alan K. SGT John " Mac " McConnell SFC William Farrell LTC (Join to see) SSgt Robert Marx PO1 Tony Holland Maj Marty Hogan SCPO Morris Ramsey
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Capt Seid Waddell
Capt Seid Waddell
>1 y
SP5 Mark Kuzinski, great article! Thanks for posting it.
One wonders what happened to Chaplain Capt. Angelo J. Liteky to repudiate his MOH and turn against his religion and country.

Considering the times he served in, one might suspect drugs had something to do with it.
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