Posted on Aug 19, 2014
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Should the federal government have a say so , or should we go by the 10th amendment ?
Posted in these groups: Education_logo EducationGraduation_cap Education
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MAJ Intelligence Officer
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I think you may be misapplying the 10th amendment here. There isn't a clash.

First, the legal justification for the constitutionality of federal education programs is under the Commerce clause, thus making it not in conflict with the 10th Amendment. The reason for that is that the fed sets standards for education and make compliance with them a condition of receiving federal funding. States can decide to go it alone, but they wouldn't be able to afford it. It's the same way that the fed controls highway speeds and the national drinking age by tying it to federal highway funding.

Second, private and home school options are available everywhere. In most jurisdictions, they are held to little standards at all, and in some places no standards at all. Options are out there in droves.

Third, the government (local, state, and fed) has a specific interest in setting education standards and in making said education available to the widest degree possible. There is the inherent benefit of having an educated populace, but also the value to the economy of having a workforce derived from a pool with a good foundation of education. There's also the broadcasting factor that standards allow, which permits a diploma from most public schools to be considered at least roughly on par with each other. And don't forget that, as weak as the standards are (I think they should be much stronger), without them we would be slipping further and faster into international irrelevance in education.
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I agree with the block grants but I think categorized grants are a little to far. I just think the states shouldn't be under pressure of having to accept the money for a certain specific thing (at times yes it is necessary) I just believe it is over used for the government to get there hands inside the school. What are your thoughts on high school education , as in what they are learning ?
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MAJ Intelligence Officer
MAJ (Join to see)
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Personally, I think it doesn't go far enough. Far too many kids are able to attain a diploma, but are woefully under-prepared if they try to go to college.

To illustrate what I mean by that, when I graduated High School, there was a $10k block scholarship in my state provided to any student who attained a diploma with at least a 2.5 GPA, with the condition that it could only be used at accredited, in-state colleges (and was only good for 10 years). During my college years, they smartly advanced the requirements to a 2.75 and later a 3.0 GPA, as well as limiting it to courses toward attaining a degree. The big change, however, was when they restricted it so it could no longer be used on remedial (sub-100-level) courses, a change made only a few months before the start of the school year. Attendance by new freshmen fell dramatically, and has stayed lower since, and the class sizes (and number) of remedial courses offered also fell. Pretty much 100% of the lost students were those not ready to enter college.

Now, in my mind, that means they weren't prepared, and thus the courses needed to get a diploma should be more involved and demanding. It also means that there were a lot of people who squeaked by who (and I hate to say this as a liberal but it is true) should not be going to college, but had it drummed into their heads that they must because there were not nearly enough vocational options available for them to find alternate careers that they could be passionate about and excel in. The lack of good vocational training is a completely separate but equally problematic failing of the system.
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PFC Admin Officer
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Hmm I see your point, I agree I believe the class should be more indepth. I remember when I was taking high school literature in honors & AP I practically learned nothing, because the classes didn't demand a standerized test and it completely screwed me over when I started college literature. I know in the state of Georgia they have implemented mandatory test for ever class at the high school level to make sure the teachers are doing there part. Which I personally believe it's a great idea , because I noticed the classes I had (including acedmics) that didn't have a mandatory testing the teachers didn't care. So I believe the new mandatory testing for every class including electives is an excellent idea. I believe if they had it while I was taking high school classes I would have been more educated and prepared for college. This is why I started this discussion.
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MAJ Javier Rivera
MAJ Javier Rivera
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I have to agree 100% with your entire statement regarding vocational education MAJ (Join to see). College is not for everyone and for whatever reason, it has been drilled to all of us (yes, I include myself) that it’s a must to succeed in life. False!!!!! Many vocational / trade careers outhere with an exponentially better outlook than a college degree!
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Cadet CPL Aircraft Mechanic
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Edited 27 d ago
Students prefer to search for answers on Google. This is normal practice, but Google cannot provide mental education. I recently read an article https://www.supanet.com/google-vs-professors-what-google-can-never-teach-students-a23842.html about the struggle between Google and the professor. The main idea is the impossibility of replacing the human mentality with the help of artificial intelligence.
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Betti Volk
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I hired a tutor for my children at https://www.medicmind.co.uk/interview-online-course/. Because both have problems with chemistry. And they want to be doctors. So I have to teach her hard. So maybe you this company will come in handy.
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