Avatar_feed
Responses: 5
MAJ Javier Rivera
3
3
0
Edited 8 mo ago
When I see a trend of folks been fired it makes me wondered: are they really cleaning the house of unprofessionalism or just getting rid of regular folks who just cannot/won’t drink the PC Kool-Aid? Granted, some folks just gotta go!
(3)
Comment
(0)
Avatar_small
LCDR Joshua Gillespie
2
2
0
You know, for a while, I was convinced this was coincidence-maybe Ma Navy was just clearing out her wood shed. Now, I'm not so certain. We all understand that people slip through the cracks, that power often corrupts, and combining the high stress of command at sea, with the somewhat archaic (but necessary) structure of the same is often a recipe for trouble...but this is beginning to look like a "purge". CDR Bowen was a Chief before commissioning, and enlisted in '84...this man's been serving since I was in kindergarten. Hard to believe someone with over thirty years of service could be "incompetent". It's much easier to believe he's probably "old school", doesn't take any crap off any rank, has no time for sea lawyers, and has little patience for the variety of things that can make an already challenging job even harder to accomplish. My guess? He flamed the wrong person...someone who had friends. That, or he's taking one for his sailors in the finest traditions of the Navy. I hope we won't find out there's something darker at play.
(2)
Comment
(0)
CPT Lawrence Cable
CPT Lawrence Cable
8 mo
That's probably as true a statement in a Combat Arms unit in the Army. When you hit Brigade, the Commander of a mixed task force could be Infantry or Armor, but I can't think of an example where a combat commander came from even the Artillery or Engineers. What I see as the big difference is that your officers are more Generalist than the more specialized Army Branch's.
(1)
Reply
(0)
LCDR Joshua Gillespie
LCDR Joshua Gillespie
8 mo
CPT Lawrence Cable - I'd agree somewhat with that. It's probably because a ship at sea does all the same things a command at shore does...it just does it with fewer folks. The Electrical Division Officer on an LPD is probably also an OOD, a member of the Damage Control Training Team, and maybe even a VBSS officer or Force Protection Officer. That differs dramatically from an aviator who may indeed have many collateral duties (NATOPS officer, training officer, etc.), but whose primary role is to fly a tactical aircraft. I won't suggest that being OOD on a destroyer is as technically challenging as flying an F-18. However, it is somewhat disturbing that the twenty-three year old responsible for safely navigating a warship at 2 a.m. has probably been up since 5 a.m. the previous morning. He likely came to watch tired, focused on several other "crisis" issues in his division, struggling to stay ahead of his own qualification process, and regarding his next eight to twelve hours on the bridge as something of a "break"...as opposed to his primary area of responsibility at that time.
(0)
Reply
(0)
CPT Lawrence Cable
CPT Lawrence Cable
8 mo
LCDR Joshua Gillespie - I don't mean to imply that Army Officers don't wear a number of different hats. As an Engineer Platoon Leader, besides leading the platoon I was the Task Force Engineer on the Task Force Commanders staff, the Company NBC Officer, Movement Officer and all the others that the Captain didn't want and I couldn't stick on one of the junior officers. That doesn't stop as you go up. On Battalion Staff and above, however, most of the positions outside of Commander, XO and generally the S3, are branch immaterial. The theory being that an S1 Admin Officer or S4 Supply functions the same in an Infantry unit as it does in a transportation unit.
(0)
Reply
(0)
LCDR Joshua Gillespie
LCDR Joshua Gillespie
8 mo
CPT Lawrence Cable - That makes sense, and it's not really any different in the Navy...perception is everything I suppose. You guys call it 'combat arms', and we call it 'line", but it seems to generally be the same mentality.
(0)
Reply
(0)
Avatar_small
Lt Col Charlie Brown
2
2
0
That's what we do- take them out of command
(2)
Comment
(0)
Avatar_small

Join nearly 2 million former and current members of the US military, just like you.

close