Posted on Oct 15, 2016
SGT Intelligence/Electronic Warfare (Iew) Ncoic
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So my specific situation is as a 35T we are expected to have a very broad knowledge base. Imagine the 25 series in one MOS (35T used to be the 33 series). So having a 35T straight out of AIT I almost expect them to pick up a TM and get to work and ask questions as they go. But working in an S6 we have a bunch of 25's that needed their hand held as they did a task. Anyone else have a similar story?
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CPO Officer Candidate
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I feel high expectations and high standards bring about better results. The problems we face in today's military are rarely because the standards and expectations are too high - rather it's because the standards are not high enough and the expectations are not properly communicated. A good leader can set the standard for his troops, express their expectations in an effective manner, and bring about an excellent quality result.
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SPC Kevin Ford
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Edited 8 mo ago
A good quote is, "There is nothing so unequal as the equal treatment of unequals." The point being that not everyone is at the same state of development and some may gravitate to one job or another based on where they are at, or may have been trained to be more or less reliant on direct instruction. If you expect all your people to come in at the same development level and need the same things, you will be in for a rough ride.

An interesting concept to look into is situational leadership. In that, you take a look at your people, evaluate where they are developmentally and use a leadership style appropriate to that situation. An important thing to remember is a soldier may require one type of leadership in one situation and a completely different one in another. It's always easier when you have a bunch of knowledgeable, motivated self starters but that isn't usually the reality you have to work anywhere where junior resources come into play, sometimes senior ones too.
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SGT Writer
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25U's get the same treatment. I've gone from EOD to ADA to Infantry. As good logisticians like SSG Derrick L. Lewis MBA, C-HRM stated, it always helps to understand other MOS's. Many aren't taught important skills during AIT. That's where the Leaders come in. Lead.
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SGT Writer
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SGT (Join to see) - Very true. The most applicable thing I retained from AIT was the mindset that I would have need to embrace the "jack of all trades, master of none" mindset. I'd recommend you introduce them to skillport and LandWarNet and try to get them to read TM's. During downtime, I used to give Soldiers random Signal-related questions and issues to research and do a lot of hip-pocket training. You have to make time for those things sometimes, but they will help.
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SGT Intelligence/Electronic Warfare (Iew) Ncoic
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SGT (Join to see) - Yeah I've been doing similar things. Working in a BDE S6 I've got one into Linux+ and everyone into Sec+. FEDVTE and Skillport have been big ones. And then of course the everyday troubleshooting which most tickets are typical A+ scenarios.
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SGT (Join to see) - You're on the right track, then. FedVTE is hit or miss. Professor Messor and Cybrary.it are usually more interesting for me. Just a thought.
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SGT Intelligence/Electronic Warfare (Iew) Ncoic
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SGT (Join to see) - Pro Messor is always my personal go to.
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