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Responses: 29
MGySgt Rick Tyrrell
25
25
0
Ellen Haring is not a very bright female. Since she is complaining about not being able to carry 152 lbs when male candidates get booted from the course. She clearly wants a double standard for females. To bad suck it up carry the weight or get out of the way!
(25)
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SFC Damon M.
SFC Damon M.
>1 y
Now, I've been out of the Marines for a long time, but I was with Weapons Co. 1/4 and Weapons Co. 3/7. At the time the M2 was a "light" infantry, crew served weapon (and still may be). The receiver weighs 60 lbs., the barrel weighs 24 lbs., and the tripod weighs 44 lbs. The M252 81mm mortar, was also a "light" infantry, crew served weapon, components all approached 30 lbs. Neither of these weights include the ammo required to be humped around with it so the systems were functional. At the time, and maybe still, we did what was called the MCRES, which included a 26 mile force march in full combat load in under 8 hours. I had the misfortune of doing it with both units. I never weighed my ALICE and load, and I really have no desire to know what it actually weighed in at. I can tell you it was heavy, it was required, and it was a bitch. If Marine Corp infantry was easy, anyone could do it.
(5)
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LCpl Darrell J. Farley Jr.
LCpl Darrell J. Farley Jr.
4 mo
SSG Warren Swan it’s a conditioning thing, Marine Infantry Officers (in my day) didn’t make their troops do anything that they themselves couldn’t do. Again, in my time (early 80’s) my LT, my Platoon Sgt, And section leaders (I’m an Amtracker) would jump twice as far than the rest of us by going up and down the columns checking on us.
(1)
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PO3 Bob McCord
PO3 Bob McCord
3 mo
SFC Damon M. - Yeah that's why I joined the Navy. I salute you Marines and Army infantry that do that. I just prefer traveling on water over marching.
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LCpl Charles Moore
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CPO Mike Castro
18
17
1
What Marine gives a shit what the Army thinks?
(18)
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(1)
Sgt Joseph Baker
Sgt Joseph Baker
>1 y
Leave to a Navy Chief to cut right through it. Thanks Chief!
(3)
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Col Ray Bruneau
Col Ray Bruneau
9 mo
I think the Chief really means, "What Marine cares what an officer who is neither Marine nor infantry thinks?"
(4)
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CW4 Craig Urban
CW4 Craig Urban
3 mo
We care what you say.
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PO3 Bob McCord
PO3 Bob McCord
3 mo
Col Ray Bruneau - No I think the Chief was quite clear, and us Navy guys love the Marines. You tell em Chief
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SN Greg Wright
10
10
0
The point of the 152-pound ruck, or the giant logs the SEALs lug around in BUDs, isn't to ensure that you're prepared to carry 152 pounds or a giant log in combat. It's to test your MENTAL strength, your willpower. Do you have what it takes to gut through it. I think she missed that point.
(10)
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SSG Eddie Helmling
SSG Eddie Helmling
>1 y
in her case it (the point) was hard to see, as it was on top of her head
(2)
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SSG Michael Patton
SSG Michael Patton
>1 y
SSG Eddie Helmling - I like the double meaning there.
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MAJ Rn
MAJ (Join to see)
>1 y
I'm all in favor of weeding out any who are less than fully committed. And yet all training should be there not to just be a headFuck exercise but instead to prepare the trainee for actuall demands of combat. Years ago I did PLDC ( today Warrior Leader Course). I attended right after returning from Desert Storm. The training cadre were good guys but I lost track of how often I found myself shaking my head no ea time someone said "Of course in an actual combat situation you would be expected to do or be proficient in XYZ.." when in fact my combat experience in Kuwait showed that to not be the case. If folks downrange arent humping 150 pound weight load into Fallujah Rakka etc then it might be a better idea to focus more on what they are doing.
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Sgt Joseph Baker
Sgt Joseph Baker
>1 y
Haven't done combat Major, so I won't argue with your description of your duty experience. That being said, SN Wright is partially correct. Take the Rangers for example, I saw them spend their first afternoon doing log-rolling-drills, that being rolling around like a log in a pit filled with sand or beauty bark or something irritating like that and they have to alternate hopping over one another while doing these drills for hours. Being a Marine, knowing what it feels like to be burned to the ground physically like that, I can appreciate their torture. Do they do it to see how many soldiers can log-roll well for hours just in case they find themselves in a combat situation where rolling like a log is the only way they'll survive? No. The whole exercise is to get 20% of them to quit the very first day, and they log roll until that goal is met. Some people think, that's stupid, now their time was wasted. Many soldiers like the idea of being a Ranger, being elite, but don't have the guts and determination to stand with the Rangers. A resume won't tell you that. They don't want to waste more than those first 4 hours training the 20% of quitters that never should have come. Being a Ranger, or a SEAL, or Delta, or Marine, requires people who will not quit, ever, for any reason. It is physical, emotional, and mental. If you will quit because you got itchy, dizzy, or puked your first day, I don't want you watching my back. But, these extreme standards of physical strength and endurance ARE likewise a test to see that you can get yourself and your gear to the fight, and most importantly you can get your brother out of it. A fireman's carry is a lot quicker and more effective way to evacuate a casualty while not getting your own head shot off than trying to drag someone. You might be called on to perform such heroics while exhausted, hungry, dehydrated, discouraged, grieving, all at the same time; is that not true Major? Would you not prefer a large, very strong, very fit, very brave and determined soldier to come to your aid if you got hit? There is in my opinion a difference in being cruel for cruelty's sake and testing how much guts a person has, who needs to have to serve in combat arms, and especially to lead the same. No, most POGs like myself won't carry 100 lb pack after Basic, but there are a lot of other things they won't continue either, whereas grunts will. My hat is off to them.
(2)
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