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LTC John Griscom
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Under current law, there are three types of ROTC programs administered, each with a different element.[18]
The first are the programs at the six senior military colleges (University of North Georgia, Dahlonega, Georgia; Norwich University, Northfield, Vermont; Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas; The Citadel; Charleston, South Carolina; Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Virginia; Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, Virginia), also known as military schools. These institutions grant baccalaureate degrees (at a minimum) and organize all or some of their students into a corps of cadets under some sort of military discipline. Those participating in the cadet program must attend at least 2 years of ROTC education.
The second are programs at "civilian colleges". As defined under Army regulations, these are schools that grant baccalaureate or graduate degrees and are not operated on a military basis.
The third category is programs at military junior colleges (MJC). These are military schools that provide junior college education (typically A.S. or A.A. degree). These schools do not grant baccalaureate degrees but they meet all other requirements of military colleges (if participating in the Early Commissioning Program) and cadets are required to meet the same military standards as other schools (if enrolled in ECP), as set by Army Cadet Command. Cadets can be commissioned as second lieutenants in the Army Reserve/Army National Guard as graduating sophomores. Upon commissioning, these lieutenants are required to complete their bachelor's degree at another institution (of the lieutenant's choosing) while serving in their units. Upon receiving their bachelors, ECP lieutenants can assess active duty and go onto active duty as a first lieutenant. Only the Army currently offers an Early Commissioning Program. In time of war, MJC's have played a significant role in producing officers for the Army. During the Vietnam war, the requirement to complete one's bachelor's degree was not in effect. Therefore upon commissioning, lieutenants went straight onto active duty.
One difference between civilian colleges and the senior or junior military colleges is enrollment option in ROTC. ROTC is voluntary for students attending civilian colleges and universities. However, with few exceptions (as outlined in both Army regulations and federal law) it is required of students attending the senior and junior military colleges. Another major difference between the senior military colleges and civilian colleges is that under federal law, graduates of the SMCs are guaranteed active duty assignments if requested with the approval of the school's professor of military science.
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SGM David W. Carr  LOM, DMSM  MP SGT
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Edited >1 y ago
SFC Joe S. Davis Jr., MSM, DSL Back in 2001 as the 1114th Battalion SGM, COL Via was 3rd Sig Bde Cdr, Fort Hood and my Senior Rater.

now as a 4 star he is the highest ranking Signal officer ever
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SFC Casualty Assistance Officer
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Yep, I was in 3rd SIG from 99-01. I knew he would go far.
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LTC Stephen F.
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Thanks for letting us know SFC Joe S. Davis Jr., MSM, DSL I did not know that Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps was 100 years old.
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