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SGT Writer
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My take-away was to remember to research a company's mission statement, vision, and recent events and figure out how to align your passion with those PRE-interview.

Great short read. Thanks.
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Maj John Bell
Maj John Bell
5 y
Back when I ran my Placement Company, I had to caution my Executive placement candidates. Some of them would get so well-rehearsed and well-practiced at questions that they lost the appearance of being "the real thing." They did not realize that their answers became "tortured" talking points that didn't really address the questions.
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SGT Writer
SGT (Join to see)
5 y
Maj John Bell - Similar to being asked about the history of your current unit at a promotion board. I don't have the memory to attempt to remember anything word for word. If I don't really understand it, I probably wouldn't speak much of it, especially under the spotlight. Good point, sir.
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PO3 Steven Sherrill
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COL Mikel J. Burroughs posed a question here on RP about the necessity for sending a post interview thank you note. Part of my affirmative response included that sending a thank you E-Mail to the interviewer shows that you are fully vested in the hiring process. This shows that being fully vested in the hiring process is vitally important. I keep telling my son that all the time. It is not enough to fill out the application. You have to call the company, find out as much as you can prior to the interview, follow up after the interview, and show the company that your interest in the position is genuine. Unfortunately, there is a fine line between showing a genuine interest in working for the company, and appearing desperate and clingy. As with any relationship, you don't want to appear clingy. That is a good way to turn people away.
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COL Mikel J. Burroughs
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SGT William Howell
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I have interviewed tons of people and have never asked any of those questions after the interview. I think a lot has to do with what position and type of industry they are applying for. I work in the service industry and somebody in the manufacturing side may look at something else.

Maybe "Should we interview somebody else" might come up, but only if they can't sell me . I always ask myself. Are they qualified? Are they going to fit in with the team? What can they bring to the table that we need? Do they have the ability to self start? Some of those things I get from the candidate, some I get from past employers, some I get from looking at a work history and I always look at their social media.
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