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CPT Jack Durish
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Edited 9 mo ago
Too bad the American public who supported Carter's pardon of the draft dodgers, couldn't pardon those who served. They continued reviling and persecuting us for several more years. No, we didn't need their pardon. We did nothing that required pardoning. I'm simply pointing to their hypocrisy...
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SGT English/Language Arts Teacher
SGT (Join to see)
9 mo
I think Carter really thought he was helping to heal some of the wounds of the Vietnam War. However he did not see the unintended consequences of this. Some made bad choices, and seemed to get off without penalty. The vets felt disrespected for doing what was asked of them I have no Ill feelings for those who evaded the draft believing in their cause. However, they should have faced the consequences of their actions. Be like Thoreau, Gandhi, and Martin Luther King Jr. and face the consequences. Go to jail as they did, or don't come back to enjoy the fruits without the difficulty of planting. CPT Jack Durish
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CPT Jack Durish
CPT Jack Durish
9 mo
SGT (Join to see) - Our nation has benefited from those who practiced civil disobedience. They were our conscience. But, of all those persons you mentioned, it worked because they stood willing to accept the consequences of their actions. Those who wish to exercise freedom without taking responsibility for their decisions, their words, and their actions, are simply common criminals not deserving of pardon
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CW5 Jack Cardwell
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Good.. bad.... I have mixed feelings on this.
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MCPO Roger Collins
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You have to wonder how many of Carter’s family and friends died while draft dodgers ran for Canada? But then, he also let Iran attack our sovereign soil and hold our diplomats hostage for a year or so. Tells you a lot about his leadership.
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SGT (Other / Not listed)
SGT (Join to see)
9 mo
MCPO Roger Collins out of curiosity, what does it tell you about his leadership?

After the Beirut barracks bombing, I don’t recall an overwhelming, immediate military response. (The naval bombardment a few months later that killed plenty of civilians that had nothing to do with anything was pretty impressive, though).

When a Chinese pilot crashed his plane into our spy plane, forcing it to land on Hainan Island, the crew was detained and the plane exploited. I don’t recall an overwhelming, immediate military response. (The strongly worded apology letter we sent them was pretty impressive, though)

After those incidents where our sovereign territory was attacked, and our friends were detained or died, what did those responses say about the leadership of those presidents?
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MCPO Roger Collins
MCPO Roger Collins
9 mo
SGT (Join to see) I don’t respond to anonymous posts. When you man up like the rest of us and are verified, I will gladly debate you.
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SGT (Other / Not listed)
SGT (Join to see)
9 mo
MCPO Roger Collins - it’s not a debate. It’s an honest question. I’m not even disagreeing with you. However, I’m a bit more cynical than you. Both sides have some poor leadership.

That said, I’m a bit more honest and realistic about our history. Eagle Claw ended up being a sh*t show, but the Carter administration at least had the fortitude to attempt it. And it’s hard to deny that the length of the hostage crisis ended up being a political d*ck swinging contest. They were released a half hour after Reagan became President. (And not because he had a great first 30 minutes).

If a public RP profile is the standard to “man up”, I respectfully decline. An honest question from ‘anonymous’ is far more valuable than most of the nonsense that many RP folks proudly stamp their name on in various posts.
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